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SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR 

ONE HUNDRED NINETEENTH 

ACADEMIC YEAR 

1949-1950 



CATALOG OF COURSES 

AND 
REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 

MOBILE • SPRING HILL STATI N • A LAB AM A 



THE THOMAS BYRNE 
MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

•phinq Hitt coLieas 

• PHING HILL. ALA. 



CORPORATE TITLE 

Spring Hill College 

Spring Hill (Mobile Co.) 

Alabama 

ACCREDITED BY 

Alabama State Department of Education 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Board of Regents of the University of the State of New Yor\ 

American Medical Association 

MEMBER OF 

Association of American Colleges 

American Council of "Education 

"National Catholic Education Association 

American "Library Association 

Liberal Arts College Movement 

Educational Records Bureau 

American Association for the Advancement of Science 

Jesuit Educational Association 

Association of Alabama Colleges 



u 

r i § 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR iv 

ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 1 

Trustees and Governors 3 

Officers of Administration 4 

Officers of Instruction 5 

Committees of the Faculty 11 

Credo of Spring Hill 12 

GENERAL INFORMATION AND REGULATIONS 13 

General Information 15 

Admission Requirements and Educational Objectives 19 

The Government and the Welfare of the Students 24 

Academic Regulations 29 

Requirements for Graduation 34 

Fees and Expenses 37 

Scholarships and Student Aid 40 

Prizes and Trophies 42 

Gifts and Bequests 44 

PROGRAMS OF CURRICULA AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 45 

Programs of Curricula 47 

Departments of Instruction 59 

Biology 60 

Chemistry 62 

Classical Languages 63 

Commerce 66 

Education 70 

Engineering 72 

English 73 

History 75 

Mathematics 76 

Modern Languages 78 

M««V 81 

Philosophy 83 

Physical Education 84 

PAyxtVf 85 

Political Science 87 

Psychology 88 

Religion 88 

Sociology 89 

Speech 91 

DEGREES CONFERRED AND STUDENT REGISTER 93 

Degrees Conferred 95 

Register of Students 96 

INDEX 108 

iii 






ACADEMIC CALENDAR, 1949-1950 



Summer Session, 1949: June 13- July 22 
Regular Session, 1949-1950 



1949 

September 9-10 

September 12 

September 13 



September 

September 

September 

November 

November 

November 

November 

November 

November 

December 

December 

1950 

January 

January 



17 
23 
24 

1 

8 
11 
12 
23 
28 

8 
21 

4: 
16: 



FALL SEMESTER 

Registration and orientation for freshmen. 

Registration for upperclassmen. 

First classes of fall semester meet; fine for late registration becomes 

applicable. 
First class meetings for Saturday morning courses. 
Mass of the Holy Spirit celebrated in the College Chapel. 
Conditional examinations from the preceding semester. 
Feast of All Saints; no classes meet. 
Opening of the annual spiritual retreat for students. 
Celebration of annual Requiem Mass for deceased alumni and faculty. 
Closing of annual retreat. 

Thanksgiving recess begins after last class of the day. 
End of Thanksgiving recess; class meetings resume. 
Feast of the Immaculate Conception; no classes meet. 
Christmas recess begins after the last class of the day. 

End of Christmas recess; class meetings resume. 

Beginning of examinations for fall semester; registration for the spring 



January 



23: 



February 


11 


February 


16 


February 


20-21 


March 


19 


April 


5 


April 


12 


May 


1 


May 


22 


May 


23 



SPRING SEMESTER 

First classes of spring semester meet; fine for late registration becomes 

applicable. 
Conditional examinations from the preceding semester. 
Opening of fourth Annual Azalea Debate Tournament. 
Mardi Gras recess; no classes meet. 

Feast of St. Joseph, Patron of the College; no classes meet. 
Easter recess begins after last class of the day. 
End of Easter recess; class meetings resume. 
Senior comprehensive examinations are administered. 
Beginning of examinations for spring semester. 
Annual commencement for one hundred nineteenth academic year. 



Summer Session, 1950: June 12-July 21, 



IV 



ADMINISTRATION 

AND 

FACULTY 







TRUSTEES AND GOVERNORS 



TRUSTEES OF THE CORPORATION 

VERY REV. W. PATRICK DONNELLY, S.J., President 

REV. SIDNEY A. TONSMEIRE, S.J., Secretary 

REV. JOHN A. CRONIN, S.J., Treasurer 

REV. JOSEPH S. BOGUE, S.J. 

REV. ANDREW C. SMITH, S.J. 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

(This board, organized in 1931, is responsible for the supervision 
and administration of the endowment fund for the college.) 



VERY REV. W. PATRICK DONNELLY, S.J., Chairman ex-officio 

REV. JOSEPH M. WALSH, S.J. 

MATTHIAS M. MAHORNER, A.M., LL.B., LL.D. 

DAVID R. DUNLAP 

GORDON SMITH, Sr. 

JAMES C. VAN ANTWERP, B.S. 



Page Three 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



VERY REV. W. PATRICK DONNELLY, S.J., A.M., President 

REV. ANDREW C. SMITH, S.J., A.M., Ph. D., Dean of the College 

REV. JOSEPH C. MULHERN, S.J., A.M., Assistant Dean, Counsellor 
of Veterans, Director of Athletics 

REV. JOSEPH MICHAEL PAUL WALSH, S.J., M.A., Dean of Men 

REV. JOHN A. SWEENEY, S.J., A.B., Student Counsellor 

REV. JOHN A. CRONIN, S.J., A.M., Treasurer 

LOUIS J. BOUDOUSQUIE, M.S., Registrar 

MARIE YVONNE JAUBERT, A.B., M.A., B.L.S., Librarian 

NORBORNE R. CLARK, Jr., A.B., M.A., M.D., Attending Physician 

JOSEPH G. TYRRELL, A.B., Bursar 

WILLIAM GARDINER, A.B., Athletic Coach 

PAUL A. NAPOLITANO, B.S.C., Intramural Director 

MRS. ALBERT LEVET, R.N., Director of the Infirmary 

MRS. FLORENCE M. BARE, B.S., Dietitian 

ALVIN BUCKHAULTS, Golf Instructor 



Page Four 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



Harold Gurganus Allen, B.S.C., Instructor in Accounting. 
B.S.C., Spring Hill College, 1937. 
Instructor in Accounting, Spring Hill College, 1946. 

Arnold J. Benedetto, S.J., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1937; Ph.D., Gregorian University, 1948. 
Instructor in Classical Languages and History, St. Charles College, 1939-41; Assistant 
Professor of Philosophy, Spring Hill College, 1948. 

Samuel M. Betty, B.S.C., M.A., Assistant Professor of Economics. 
B.S.C., Spring Hill, 1939; M.A., Fordham University, 1947. 
Instructor in Economics, Spring Hill, 1946; Assistant Professor, 1948. 

James Donald Blankenship, S.J., A.B., Instructor in English. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1946. 

Instructor, Jesuit High, New Orleans, La., Summer, 1947; Assistant in English, Spring 
Hill College, 1947; Instructor, 1948. 

Joseph S. Bogue, S.J., Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1925; A.M., 1826; Ph.D., Gregorian University, Rome, 1937. 
Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1926-1928; Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 
1928-29; Professor, Spring Hill College, 1937. 

Louis J. Boudousquie, M.S., Registrar, Associate Professor of Drawing and 
Mathematics. 

B.S., Spring Hill, 1917; M.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1936. 
Instructor, McGill Institute, Mobile, 1921-1928; Registrar and Instructor, Spring Hill, 
1928; Associate Professor, 1936. 

O. L. Chason, B.S., M.D., D.P.H., Special Lecturer in Sociology. 

B.S., University of Alabama, 1923; M.D., Tulane, 1925; D.P.H., Harvard, 1934. 
City Health Officer, Mobile, 1934. 

Arthur A. Colkin, S.J., A.B., Assistant Professor of History. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1935. 

Instructor in History, Spring Hill College, 1937-1941; Assistant Professor of History, 
1946. 

Joseph A. Crane, B.S.C., Special Lecturer in Real Estate and Insurance. 
B.S.C., Spring Hill College, 1935. 

Page Five 



Daniel M. Cronin, S.J., A.M., Professor of Mathematics. 
A.B., St. Louis, 1900; A.M., 1901. 

Instructor, Spring Hill, 1901-1903; Jesuit High School New Orleans, 1903-1906; 
Associate Professor, Chairman of Mathematics, Spring Hill, 1913-1935; Secretary, Jesuit 
High School, Tampa, Fla., 1935-1938; Associate Professor, Spring Hill, 1939-1945. 
Professor, 1946. 

John A. Cronin, S.J., A.M., Professor of Economics, Chairman of the 
Department. 

B.S.C., Spring Hill, 1929; M.A., St. Louis University, 1937. 
Professor of Economics, Spring Hill, 1937-38, 1943; Chairman of the Department, 1943. 

John Vincent Deignan, S.J., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry, Chairman of 
the Department. 

A.B., National University, Dublin, 1907; A.M., Woodstock College, 1917; Ph.D., Ford- 
ham University, 1929. 
Instructor in Chemistry, Spring Hill, 1917-1922; Professor and Chairman, 1929. 

Louis J. Eisele, S.J., M.S., Assistant Professor of Physics. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1935; M.S., 1940. 

Teaching Fellow, St. Louis University, 1939-1940; Instructor in Physics and Mathe- 
matics, 1940-1941, Spring Hill College; Assistant Professor of Physics, 1946. 

Frank P. Ellis, M.S. (Bus. Ad.), Special Lecturer in Transportation. 
B.S.C., Spring Hill College, 1946; M.S., Columbia University, 1947. 
Secretary-treasurer, Merchants Transfer Co., Mobile; Special Lecturer, Spring Hill Col- 
lege, 1949. 

Joseph B. Franckhauser, S.J., A.M., Professor Emeritus of German. 
A.B., Woodstock College, 1900; A.M., 1901. 

Professor, Loyola University of the South, 1912-1913; President St. John's College, 
Shreveport, La., 1927-1930; Professor of German, Spring Hill College, 1936-1948; 
Professor Emeritus, 1948. 

William C. Gardiner, A.B., Instructor of Physical Education and Coach. 
A.B., Georgetown University, 1943. 

Athletic Instructor, Washington, D. C, Recreation Department, 1942; Athletic Instruc- 
tor, U. S. Army, 1943-1946; Athletic Instructor and Coach, Spring Hill, 1946. 

John A. Gasson. S.J., Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psychology, Chair- 
man of the Department of History and Social Science. 

A.B., Boston College, 1927; A.M., 1928; Ph.D., Gregorian University, Rome, 1931; 
S.T.L., Weston College, 1934. 

Instructor in History, Latin and Greek, Spring Hill, 1928-30; Professor of Philosophy 
and Psychology, Spring Hill, 1937. 

Charles C. Goetz, S.J., S.T.L.. Assistant Professor of Religion. 

B.S., Spring Hill College, 1938; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1947. 
Instructor in Chemistry, Spring Hill College, 1946-1947; Assistant Professor of Reli- 
gion, 1948. 

Page Six 



Kermit Hart, M.S. (Bus. Ad.), C.P.A., Special Lecturer in Accounting. 

B.S. (Bus. Ad.), University of Florida, 1927; M.S. (Bus. Ad.), University of Alabama, 
1940; C.P.A. (Alabama). 

Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1928-37; Assistant Professor, 1937-41; Associate Pro- 
fessor, 1941-46; Special Lecturer, 1946. 

John J. Holden, M. of Ed., Instructor in History. 

B.S., Ithaca College, 1933; M. of Education, Rutgers University, 1946. 
Educational Adviser, Civilian Conservation Corps, 1934-38; Instructor, Middleboro 
Public Schools, 1939-42; Ordnance Department, War Department, 1942-46; Instructor in 
History, Spring Hill, 1947. 

John A. Hutchins, S.J., A.M., Professor of French. 
A.B., Woodstock College, 1911; A.M., 1912. 

Instructor, St. Boniface College, Winnipeg, Canada, 1913-1916; Jesuit High School, 
1921-1922; Spring Hill High School, 1924-1927; Professor of French, Spring Hill 
College, 1927. 

James V. Irby, Jr., B.S., Instructor in Speech. 
B.S., Spring Hill, 1942. 

Instructor, Army Air Forces, Army Ground Forces, Army Service Forces, 1943-1946; 
Instructor, Spring Hill, 1946. 

Francis L. Janssen, S.J., M.A.. Professor of Language and Philosophy, Chair- 
man of the Department of Languages. 
M.A., Gonzaga University, 1922. 

Professor of Languages, Religion, Philosophy, Spring Hill, 1932-37, 1942-43; Assistant 
Dean, Loyola University, New Orleans, 1937-42; Principal, St. John's High, Shreveport, 
1943-46; Professor of Languages, Religion, and Philosophy, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Languages, Spring Hill, 1947. 

Everett H. Larguier, S.J., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics and Chairman 
of the Department of Mathematics and Physics. 

A.B., St. Louis University, 1934; M.S., Ibid, 1936; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1947. 
Teaching Fellow, St. Louis University, 1934-35; Professor of Mathematics and Physics, 
Spring Hill, 1937-38; Assistant, Department of Mathematics, St. Louis University, 
1938-42; Visiting Lecturer in Mathematics, Loyola University, New Orleans, Summer, 
1942; Professor of Mathematics and Chairman of the Department of Mathematics and 
Physics, Spring Hill College, 1947. 

Warren J. Martin, S.J., A.M., Special Instructor in Spanish. 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1925; A.M., 1926. 
Instructor, Jesuit High School, Tampa, 1934-1944; St. John's, Shreveport, 1944-45. 

Frederick French McCaffery, S.J., A.B., Instructor in English. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1947; Cand. M.A., Fordham University, 1949. 
Instructor in English, Spring Hill College, 1948. 

James E. Moore, A.B., LL.B., Special Lecturer in Business Law. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1939; LL.B., University of Alabama, 1948. 
Special Lecturer in Business Law, Spring Hill College, 1948. 

Page Seven 



John F. Moore, S.J., B.S., Assistant in Mathematics and Physics. 
B.S., Spring Hill College, 1946. 

Instructor, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1947-1948; Assistant, Spring Hill College, 
1948. 

John Moreau, S.J.. Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1926; A.M., 1927; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1934; Ph.D., 
Gregorian University, 1938; Mag. Agg., 1938. 
Professor of Philosophy, Spring Hill, 1938. 

Thomas F. Mulcrone, S.J., M.S., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
B.S., Spring Hill College, 1939; M.S., Catholic University, 1942. 
Instructor in Mathematics, Spring Hill College, 1940-41; 1942-43; Assistant in Mathe- 
matics, St. Louis University, 1945-46; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Spring Hill 
College, 1948. 

Joseph C. Mulhern, S.J., A.M., Professor of Education, Chairman of the 
Department. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1928; A.M., 1929. 

Instructor in English, Spring Hill, 1929-1932; Principal, Jesuit High School, New 
Orleans, 1937-42; Principal, Jesuit High School, Dallas, 1942-45; Professor of Educa- 
tion, Chairman of the Department, Spring Hill, 1945. 

John H. Mullahy, S.J., M.S., Assistant Professor of Biology* 

A.B., St. Louis University, 1937; M.S., Fordham University, 1942; S.T.L., St. Louis 
University, 1947. 

Instructor in Biology, Spring Hill, 1939-41; Assistant Professor of Biology, Spring 
Hill, 1947. 

Malcolm Patrick Mullen, S.J., A.M., S.T.L., Assistant Professor of 
Philosophy. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1928; A.M., 1929; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1936. 
Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1929-32; Jesuit High School, New Orleans, Sum- 
mers 1930-32; Associate Professor, Loyola University, New Orleans, 1937-38; Assistant 
Professor, Spring Hill College, 1939. 

Raymond Jerome Mullin. S.J., A.M., Assistant Professor of Philosophy and 
Religion. 

LL.B., Brooklyn Law School, 1910; LL.M., St. Lawrence University, 1912; A.B., 
Gonzaga University, 1929; A.M., 1930; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1935. 
Instructor in Languages, Loyola University, 1929-1930; Assistant Professor of Philosophy, 
Sociology and Religion, 1940-1946; Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion, 
Spring Hill College, 1948. 

J. Franklin Murray, S.J., A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1937; A.M., 1942; S.T.L., 1947. 
Instructor in English, Spring Hill College, 1939-1940, 1941-42; Assistant Professor, 1946. 

Joseph Otto Muscat, M.D., Associate Professor of Biology (Part time). 
M.D., St. Louis University, 1931. 



* Absent on leave. 
Page Eight 



Paul A. Napolitano, B.S.C., Intramural Director, Instructor in Physical Edu- 
cation and Assistant Athletic Coach. 
B.S.C., Spring Hill College, 1948. 

Instructor of Physical Education, Intramural Director and Assistant Coach, Spring Hill 
College, 1948. 

Robert C. Oglesby, S.J., M.S., Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. 
B.S., Spring Hill College, 1946; M.S., Fordham University, 1947. 
Instructor in Mathematics and Physics, Spring Hill, 1947. 

John J. O'Keefe, S.J., A.M., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1935; A.M., 1939. 

Instructor, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1936-1939, 1944-1946; Instructor, Spring 
Hill College, 1946. 

Mme. Rose Palmai-Tenser, Instructor in Choral Singing. 

Diploma from the Conservatory of Music at Prague, Czechoslovakia. 
Music Instructor, Private Schools in Czechoslovakia and England. 

Eugene T. Regal. A.B., A.M., Assistant Professor of Biology. 
A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1933; A.M., Ibid, 1934. 

Instructor in Biology, Marquette University, 1935-1936; Professor of Science, St. 
Francis Seminary, Milwaukee, 1936-1939; Instructor in Biology and Director of Intra- 
mural Athletics and Student Organizations, Milwaukee Public School System, 1939- 
1945; Education Director in charge of Visual Aid and Athletic Programs for Wisconsin 
Coca-Cola Co., 1945-1947; Assistant Professor of Biology, Spring Hill College, 1948. 

Andrew Cannon Smith, S.J., Ph.D., Dean, Professor of English, Chairman 
of the Department. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1923; A.M., Catholic University, 1930; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago, 1934. 

Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1923-1924; Assistant Professor of English, Loyola 
University of the South, 1931-1932; Dean and Professor of English, Spring Hill, 1934; 
Chairman of the Department, 1936. 

Thomas A. Steely, S.J., A.B., Assistant in Sociology and German. 

A.B., Spring Hill College, 1938; Graduate studies in St. Louis University School of 

Social Work. 

Assistant in Sociology and German, Spring Hill College, 1948. 

Edmund B. Sullivan, M.S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
B.S. in Chemistry, Holy Cross College, 1932; M.S. in Chemistry, 1934. 
Instructor, Spring Hill, 1936-41; Assistant Professor, 1941. 

John A. Sweeney, S.J., A.B., Assistant Professor of Religion and Sociology, 
Chairman of the Department of Religion. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1936. 
Instructor, Spring Hill, 1938-41; Assistant Professor and Student Counsellor, 1947. 

Page Nine 



Franklyn H. Sweet. M.S., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting. 
B.S., University of Alabama, 1938; M.S., 1948; C.P.A. (Alabama). 
Assistant Professor of Accounting, University of Alabama, 1946-1948; Professor of 
Accounting, Spring Hill College, 1948. 

Henry Francis Tiblier, S.J., Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy, Chairman of 
the Department. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1927; A.M., 1928; Ph.D., Gregorian University, 1942. 
Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1926-1931; Associate Professor of Philosophy, 
Loyola University of the South, 1935-1936; Associate Professor of Philosophy, Spring 
Hill College, 1937; Chairman of the Department, 1947; Professor, 1948. 

Morris Timbes, Special Lecturer in Advertising. 
Advertising executive in Mobile. 

Edwin McKeon Trigg, B.S., Instructor in Chemistry. 
B.S., Spring Hill, 1941. 

Chemist, E. I. Dupont deNemours & Co., 1941-1946; Research Assistant, University of 
Chicago, 1944, on assignment from E. I. Dupont de Nemours & Co.; Instructor, Spring 
Hill College, 1946. 

Oscar Patrick Usina, S.J., B.S., Laboratory Assistant in Physics. 
B.S., Spring Hill College, 1947. 
Laboratory Assistant, Spring Hill College, 1948. 

Joseph Michael Paul Walsh, S.J., M.A., Assistant Professor of Philosophy, 
and Dean of Men. 

B.S.C., Spring Hill College, 1932; Gonzaga University, 1938. 

Assistant Principal, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1940-1941; Assistant Professor 
of Philosophy, Spring Hill College, 1946; Dean of Men, 1948. 

Scott Youree Watson, S.J.. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1937; Ph.L., Gregorian University, 1947; Ph.D., 1948. 
Instructor, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1939-1941; Instructor, St. Charles College, 
summers 1940 and 1941; Instructor, Spring Hill College, summer 1945; Assistant 
Professor of Philosophy, Spring Hill College, 1948. 

Patrick Henry Yancey, S.J., Ph.D., Professor of Biology, Chairman of the 
Department. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1918; A.M., 1919; Ph.D. St. Louis University, 1931. 
Instructor in Biology, Spring Hill, 1919-1923; St. Louis University, 1930-1931; Professor 
of Biology, Chairman of the Department, 1931. 



Page Ten 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

(19484949) 

Admissions and Degrees: 

Mr. Boudousquie, Chairman, Frs. J. Cronin, Deignan, Mulhern and 
Murray. 

Curriculum: 

The chairmen of the various departments of instruction: Fr. Smith 
(English), Chairman, Frs. J. Cronin (Commerce), Deignan (Chemistry), 
Gasson (History and Social Sciences), Janssen (Languages), Larguier 
(Mathematics and Physics), Mulhern (Education), Sweeney (Religion), 
Tiblier (Philosophy), and Yancey (Biology). 

Faculty Ran\ and Tenure: 

Fr. Yancey, Chairman, Frs. Bogue, D. Cronin, Franckhauser, Larguier 
and Tiblier. 

Library: 

Miss Jaubert, Chairman, Frs. Gasson, Larguier and Watson and Mr. Usina. 

Student Welfare: 

Fr. Sweeney, Chairman, Frs. J. Cronin, O'Keefe, Messrs. Steeley and 
Sullivan. 

Discipline: 

Fr. Walsh, Chairman, Frs. Bogue, Goetz, Smith and Mr. Blankenship. 

Athletics: 

Fr. Mulhern, Chairman, Fr. Martin, Messrs. Gardiner, Napolitano and 
Oglesby. 

Publications: 

Fr. Goetz, Chairman, Frs. Colkin, Larguier and Yancey and Mr. Mc- 
Caffery. 

Student Grants-in-Aid: 

Fr. Smith, Chairman, Frs. J. Cronin, Deignan and Hutchins and Mr. Jno. 
Moore. 

Veterans' Affairs: 

Fr. Mulhern, Chairman, Fr. Mullin, Messrs. Allen, Boudousquie and Irby. 

Public Occasions: 

Fr. Murray, Chairman, Fr. Eisele, Messrs. Holden, McCaffery and Sweet. 

Alumni-Student Relations: 

Fr. Colkin, Chairman, Fr. J. Cronin, Messrs. Betty, Steely and Trigg. 

Page Eleven 



CREDO OF SPRING HILL 



The hope of the future is to mold the mind of youth. Foreign dictator- 
ships sought to perpetuate their shackles through "youth movements." 
American youth is exposed to these poisons which can destroy our hard- 
won liberties. 

SPRING HILL COLLEGE refuses to subscribe to the doctrine that 
"academic freedom" may be used as a pretext to teach systems which destroy 
all freedom. We proudly boast that it has always taught and always will 
teach the following creed: 

We believe in God 

We believe in the personal dignity of man 

We believe that man has certain rights which come from God 
and not from the State 

We therefore are opposed to all forms of dictatorships which 
hold that the "total man" (totalitarianism) belongs to the State 

We believe in the sanctity of the home — the basic unit of Society 

We believe in the natural right of private property, but like- 
wise that private property has its social obligations 

We believe that Labor has not only rights but obligations 

We believe that Capital has not only rights but obligations 

We are vigorously opposed to all forms of racism — persecution 
or tolerance because of race 

We believe that liberty is a sacred thing, but that law, which 
regulates liberty, is a sacred obligation 

We believe in inculcating all the essential liberties of American 
Democracy and ta\e open and fran\ issue with all brands of 
spurious "democracy!' 

We believe, briefly, in the teachings of Christ, who held that morality 
must regulate the personal, family, economic, political and international life 
of men if civilization is to endure. 

Page Twelve 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

AND 

REGULATIONS 




GENERAL INFORMATION 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 

The first Bishop of Mobile, the Right Reverend Michael Portier, 
D.D., laid the cornerstone of the first building of Spring Hill Col- 
lege on July 4, 1830. It stood on the site of the present Administra- 
tion Building and was opened for classes in November, 1831. Five 
years later, the Governor of Alabama signed the legislative bill 
which chartered the Bishop's seminary-college and gave it "full 
power to grant or confer such degree or degrees in the arts and 
sciences, or in any art or science ... as are usually granted or con- 
ferred by other seminaries of learning in the United States." This 
power was used in the following year, 1837, when four graduates 
received their degrees. Spring Hill thus takes its place among the 
three oldest colleges in the South, while of Jesuit Boarding Colleges, 
it is the oldest after Georgetown. 

As the years went on and the college enrollment rose from 
thirty to more than a hundred, the Bishop found it more and more 
difficult to provide from the limited personnel of his missionary 
clergy the necessary minimum of priest-teachers and administrators. 
The first two Presidents of Spring Hill were called away to be 
Bishops, one to Dubuque (Bishop Lor as), the other to Vincennes 
(Bishop Bazin), and the third, Father Mauvernay died after a very 
brief term of office. Reluctantly, Bishop Portier was compelled to 
transfer his college to a newly arrived French Congregation, the 
Fathers of Mercy. With little or no experience in teaching, these 
zealous missionaries found the direction of Spring Hill a thank- 
less task and gave it up after two years. A similar experiment with 
the Eudists succeeded no better, and in 1845 the College suspended 
operations, pending some new arrangement. 

In this crisis the Lyons province of the Society of Jesus was per- 
suaded to take over Spring Hill, and the new regime was in- 

Page Fifteen 



1 



augur ated with Father Francis Gautrelet, S.J., as President, in Sep- 
tember, 1847. Since that time through many vicissitudes, the Jesuit 
Fathers have directed the policies of the college and endeavored 
to make it a center of liberal culture. During the Civil War, studies 
continued without interruption, but a costly fire* in 1869 destroyed 
the main building and required the removal of students and faculty 
to St. Charles College, Grand Coteau, Louisiana. Through the 
generous aid of many friends, particularly Bishop Quinlan, "the 
second founder," a new building rose on the site of the old, and the 
new Spring Hill opened its doors. 

Until 1921 the High School and College Departments were not 
perfectly separate in organization and faculty, but after that date, 
a more clear-cut division was noticeable. Within a few years new 
buildings arose on the western side of the campus, and thither the 
college removed for classes and recreation. With the close of the 
term in 1935, the High School department was discontinued, and 
the whole plant thus given over to the needs of the college.* 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The College Campus occupies some 700 acres of the elevation 
which gives its name to this residential suburb of Mobile. The 
city and bay are both visible from the hill and easily accessible I 
either by bus line or by the famous Old Shell Road, which passes 
the college gates. The village of Spring Hill has a post office, but 
ho railroad station. The prospective student or visitor will there- 
fore come first to Mobile, a beautiful city of the Old South, now 
nationally famous for its Azalea Trail. 

Spring Hill is on the Azalea Trail, just six miles from the center 
of the city. The natural beauty of its well-chosen site, adorned with 
an almost endless variety of trees and shrubs and flowers, its lake, 
its shaded avenues, and the striking setting of its athletic fields and 
its buildings make the campus one of the most attractive in the 
United States. 

Owing to its altitude and the invigorating influence of its 
resinous pines upon the surrounding atmosphere, Spring Hill holds 



ei: 



an 



*Those interested in the full story of the first hundred years of Spring Hill should read S 
Kenny, M., S.J., The Torch on the Hill (Centenary History of Spring Hill College), j 
Spring Hill College, Spring Hill, Ala. Oil 

Page Sixteen 



one of the best records for health in the country. The air is pure 
and bracing, and even in the hottest summer months, the temper- 
ture, thanks to the nearby Gulf, is usually several degrees lower 
than in the neighboring city. The mildness of the climate all the 
year round makes it possible for outdoor sports to continue with- 
out interruption. 

The Admistration Building stands on the site of the first build- 
ing which Bishop Portier erected for his pioneer college. The pres- 
ent plant, erected partly in 1869, partly in 1909, to replace the dam- 
age caused by historic fires, is a brick structure several hundred feet 
in length and three stories high. Covered Spanish colonnades join 
it to the Dining Hall on the west, the Infirmary on the east, and 
the Chapel on the north. The building itself is occupied by the 
Faculty and the administrative offices. Class rooms are also located 
in this building. 

The Infirmary Building is the only building in present use 
which antedates the fire of 1869. On the first floor is located the 
pharmacy under the charge of a registered nurse; and the rooms 
on the second floor are equipped to take care of all ordinary cases 
of illness. 

The Refectory Building across the quadrangle from the 
Infirmary contains the dining halls for faculty and students. The 
faculty hall upstairs is brightened by the painting which Napoleon's 
uncle, Cardinal Fesch, presented to his friend Bishop Portier for 
his new college. The students' dining hall is on the lower floor. 

The College Chapel, dedicated to the Patron of the College, 
St. Joseph, was built in 1910. It is modified Gothic in style, and 
beautifully appointed within. 

Yenni Hall, erected and named in memory of Father Dominic 
Yenni, S.J., Professor of Latin and Greek at Spring Hill for over 
fifty years, and author of Yenni's Latin and Greek Grammars, is 
entirely devoted to Science. Here are installed on different floors 
the Physics, Chemistry, and Biology lecture rooms and laboratories, 
and the Seismographic Station. 

The Thomas Byrne Memorial Library, the newest building 
on the campus is the gift of Mrs. Byrne in memory of her husband 

Page Seventeen 



and son. It was completed in 1930. It has room for 150,000 volumes. 
The general reading room is large enough to accommodate 100 
students at one time. There are besides smaller rooms for research 
and conference, and one large lecture room. A special section of 
the building contains the Lavretta Library, donated by Mr. L. C. 
Lavretta, a Mobile Alumnus. 

The College Inn is a recreation center midway between the 
golf course and Mobile Hall. Recently redecorated, it contains a 
lounge, a little theatre, dance hall and fraternity meeting rooms. 

The Gymnasium is located in a building just west of the 
Dining Hall. It contains a basketball court, locker rooms, and 
showers. 

Quinlan Hall is the name given to the long corridor of rooms, 
built over the Gymnasium-Auditorium Building in 1916, and 
named in honor of Spring Hill's second founder, Bishop Quinlan. 
There are 40 living rooms in the building, each equipped with 
clothes-press and lavatory. 

Mobile Hall is the largest dormitory building. Dedicated 
November 6, 1927, it gave a new center to the college campus. 
Built on modern lines and with ample provision for the future 
growth of the college, it has space and equipment for housing over 
100 students. Temporarily some of the rooms on the first floor 
have been arranged as offices and classrooms. The living rooms 
in this building are bright and airy, and provided with every 
modern convenience. 

Cummings Hall and Kenny Hall, named respectively for a 
deceased President and Dean of the College, Father Edward 
Cummings, and for its historian and long-time Philosophy Profes- 
sor, the late Father Michael Kenny, are temporary dormitory build- 
ings erected with the help of the FWA to house Veterans. 



Page Eighteen 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND 
EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES 



The College requires for admission the satisfactory completion 
of a four year course in a secondary school approved by a recog- 
nized accrediting agency. All candidates for admission to Fresh- 
man year must present sixteen units in acceptable subjects. A unit 
represents a year's study in any subject, constituting approximately 
a quarter of a full year's work. This definition of a unit takes the 
four-year high school as a basis and assumes that the length of the 
school year is from thirty-six to forty weeks, that a period is from 
forty-five to sixty minutes in length, and that the study is pursued 
for four or five periods a week. Candidates are admitted either by 
certificate or by examination. 

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE 

Admission unconditionally by certificate is granted applicants 
from approved secondary schools provided: (1) their 16 high 
school units include 12 of strictly academic nature (i.e., English, 
Mathematics, Languages, History, Natural Science, Social Science), 
and specifically such as correlate in the opinion of the Board of 
Admission with the course which the candidates intend to pursue; 
(2) that the student's rank in his high school class be better than 
that of the lowest quartile, or alternatively, that more than half of 
his grades be better than D; and (3) that there is satisfactory 
evidence of personal character and other qualities deemed requisite 
by the College for desirable students. 

Students from countries where the English language is not the 
vernacular are required to have a sufficient mastery of the English 
language to enable them to follow class lectures without difficulty. 
No special classes in English will be provided by the college for 
these students. 

Blank forms of entrance certificates which are to be used in 
every case may be had on application to the Registrar. Certificates 

Page Nineteen 



must be made out and signed by the Principal, or other recognized 
officer of the secondary school, and sent by him directly to the 
Registrar. Such certificates upon submission become the property 
of the College, whether the applicant is accepted or not. 



ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 



Applicants, who are not entitled to admission by certificate, may 
with permission of the Board of Admissions take examinations for 
admission. These examinations are held during the first week of 
September. Applicants who are rejected for reasons of character 
or academic ranking are not eligible for these examinations. 



ADMISSION ON PROBATION 

Upon special recommendation of their Principal, graduates of 
four year non-accredited high schools will be admitted without 
examination on probation for their first semester, provided they 
fully satisfy the quantitative and qualitative entrance requirements 
enumerated above. Admission on probation, but with a limited 
schedule, may also be granted by the Board of Admissions to stu- 
dents who though otherwise acceptable are ranked in the lowest 
quartile of their high school class, provided there is additional 
evidence of seriousness of purpose and reasonable prospect of suc- 
cess in college. Students on probation are liable to dismissal for 
poor scholarship at the end of the semester unless they pass every 
subject in their limited schedule. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Students applying for admission from other institutions of col- 
legiate rank will be given advanced standing provided the courses 
taken are considered comparable to those given at Spring Hill. In 
the evaluation of previous work, no credit will be accepted for 
work done with less than a C average for the year. The transfer 
student must also present an honorable dismissal from the last in- 
stitution attended. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Mature and earnest students who either are lacking in the re- 
quired units or wish to pursue particular studies without reference 
to graduation, may be admitted by the permission of the Dean to 

Page Twenty 



such courses of their own choice as they seem qualified to take. 
The work done by these students cannot be counted later on toward 
a degree unless all entrance requirements have been satisfied. 

STATEMENT OF THE OBJECTIVES 

Ultimate Objectives 

As a Jesuit Liberal Art College, Spring Hill has the same pri- 
mary purpose as the Catholic educational system taken in its en- 
tirely. This is best expressed in the words of Pope Pius XI: "The 
proper and immediate end of Christian education is to cooperate 
with divine grace in forming the true and perfect Christian, that 
is, to form Christ Himself in those regenerated by baptism. . . . The 
true Christian, product of Christian education, is the supernatural 
man who thinks, judges and acts constantly and consistently in 
accordance with right reason, illuminated by the supernatural light 
of the example and teaching of Christ; in other words, to use the 
current term, the true and finished men of character." 

Immediate Objectives 

It is in terms of this end that the Jesuit College of Liberal Arts 
conceives its special function in contemporary American life. Obvi- 
ously, then, it will not neglect the field of religion. Instruction in 
Catholic faith and morals will always be a part of its task. But it 
is not the whole. The Jesuit college by its traditions can never be 
content with simply presenting Catholicism as a creed, a code or 
a cult. It must strive to communicate the riches of Catholicism as 
a culture, thus giving the modern man a coign of vantage whence 
to view with understanding not merely the facts in the natural 
order, but those in the supernatural order also, those facts which 
give meaning and coherence to the whole life. 

Jesuit education regards the college of liberal arts as the heart 
of its system. It is through the instrumentality of such colleges 
that Catholic leaders will be formed, men and women who have 
been trained spiritually and intellectually in the Catholic sense, who 
have intelligent and appreciative contact with Catholicism as a 
culture, who through their general education in the college of arts 
have so developed their powers of mind and heart and will that 
they can take an active part in the service of Church and society. 

Page Twenty-one 



The Jesuit college in its teaching aims at reaching the whole 
man, his intellect, his will, his emotions, his senses, his imagination, 
his aesthetic sensibilities, his memory, and his powers of expression. 
It seeks to lift up man's whole being to that broad, spiritual out- 
look on life whereby he not only understands and appreciates the 
fact that our entire social heritage is bound up with the Truth, 
Goodness and Beauty of God as seen in Revelation, Nature, Art, 
and Language, but is likewise willing and ready to become identi- 
fied with those activities, individual as well as collective, that make 
for the sanctification of the individual and the betterment of society. 

The Jesuit college strives to provide a broad foundation in gen- 
eral education, upon which advanced study in a special field may 
be built. 

Vocational Objectives 

In addition to these objectives held in common with all Jesuit 
colleges, Spring Hill aims by proper direction in the choice of elec- 
tive studies to prepare her graduates for successful work in profes- 
sional schools, in business, and in teaching. 

Specific Objectives of the Various Academic Degrees 

The objective of the Arts (A.B.) degree or curriculum is to 
give a balanced cultural education as a foundation for full living. 
This objective is to be attained through the humanistic and philos- 
ophic disciplines, supplemented by training in scientific and mathe- 
matical thinking, the entire curriculum to be integrated by 
acquaintance with the social and religious factors that have entered 
into the making of Western civilization, and that contribute to the 
solution of contemporary problems. 

The objective of the Science (B.S.) degree or curriculum is to 
give by means of the natural sciences, or social sciences, a thorough 
training in the scientific method as a basis of sound scientific think- 
ing, balanced by cultural training in language, literature and his- 
tory, and correlated as intimately as possible with scholastic philos- 
ophy. 

The objective of the Commerce (B.S.) degree or curriculum is 
to give a systematic and balanced training in the problems and 
principles of business administration with specialization in one of 

Page Twenty-two 



three fields related to the world of commerce, supplemented by 
cultural work in language, history and scholastic philosophy. 

Objectives of Pre-projessional Curricula 

The Pre-Legal Course prepares the student for admission to 
various recognized Law Schools of the United States by two or 
three years of degree work, with emphasis on the social sciences. 

The Pre-Medical Course enables the student to fulfill the en- 
trance requirements of the various Class A Medical Schools, taking 
three years of degree work with emphasis on the pre-medical 
sciences. 

The Pre-Dental Course in two years qualifies the student for 
admission to various Class A Dental Schools. The curriculum is 
much the same as that of the pre-medical course. 

The Engineering Course supplies the mathematical deficiencies 
of the beginning engineering student and gives him at least the 
first year of basic engineering, common to all engineering curricula. 
To finish his course the student must transfer after one or two 
years to a fully accredited Engineering School. 

The Nursing Course, while preparing the nursing students of 
the City Hospital and Providence Hospital of Mobile for their 
diplomas as Registered Nurses, gives them two years of accredited 
courses towards a Bachelors' degree in Nursing Education. 



Page Twenty-three 



THE GOVERNMENT AND THE WELFARE 
OF THE STUDENTS 



THE DISCIPLINE 

Spring Hill is committed to the belief that a system of educa- 
tion which discounts the formation of character is pernicious. For 
this reason opportunity is given to learn the important lesson of 
obedience to salutary laws and restraints. Everywhere necessary 
for ordered living, discipline is imperative when restless youths are 
forming a community of their own, as they do in a boarding school. 
Whatever the age of the students, and their opinion of their abilities 
to shape their own lives, the authorities of the school feel for their 
charges the responsibility of a parent. Rules are therefore made 
governing the out-of-class life of the students, particularly their 
social activities and absences from the campus. These rules and 
the sanctions for their observance are made known to the student 
from the beginning. Their enforcement, while considerate, is un- 
flinchingly firm. Campus discipline is administered through the 
office of the Dean of Men. 



DISCIPLINARY PENALTIES 

Naturally, in addition to minor breaches of college discipline, 
there occur at times serious offenses which require drastic punish- 
ment, even suspension or dismissal from college. Such are: serious 
insubordination, repeated violation of regulations, neglect of studies, 
possession or use of intoxicating liquors; habitual use of obscene or 
profane language, and in general any serious forms of immorality. 
In case of the suspension or dismissal of a student for such reason, 
the tuition fee is not refunded. 

Without committing any overt act of the kind described in the 
preceding paragraph, a student may at times by constant and ill- 
founded criticism, or an habitual attitude of opposition to the col- 

Page Twenty-four 



lege government become an undesirable member of the community. 
For such cases the college reserves the right to request any student 
to withdraw from school, with, however, an honorable dismissal, 
and the refund of such fees as may be refundable by the treasurer's 
regulations. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE OF STUDENTS 

The College is a Catholic institution intended primarily for 
Catholic students, but it does not exclude those of other religious 
beliefs who may wish to take advantage of its system of education. 
As a rule about 25 per cent of the whole student body, and about 
5 per cent of the boarding students are non-Catholics. Special 
courses in religion are provided for non-Catholics to replace the re- 
quired courses in Catholic religion. They are permitted and en- 
couraged to attend their own religious obligations on Sunday. By 
exception they are expected and required to assist as a part of the 
student body at the collegiate chapel services listed in the annual 
College Calendar. 

The Catholic students are given every opportunity to learn their 
religion in theory and in practice. A graded course in Religion is 
offered, running through four years, and all Catholics are obliged 
to register for these courses. Credits are given for the courses and 
required for graduation. 

Week-day Mass is required of all Catholic boarding students. 
Frequent, even daily, Communion is encouraged and quite gen- 
erally practiced. Special devotions are practiced towards the Sacred 
Heart on the first Friday of the month, and towards the Blessed 
Virgin Mary during the months of October and May. A wonder- 
ful occasion of grace for many is the annual three-day Retreat given 
in the first semester and obligatory on all Catholic students, 
boarders and day scholars alike. The day scholars will be charged 
a nominal fee for board and lodging during the three days of the 
exercises. 

One of the Fathers on the Faculty is appointed as counsellor 
or advisor of the students. His principal duty is to direct the spiritual 
activities of the college and the various religious societies and 
sodalities, in regard to which he exercises much the same super- 
vision as the Dean of Men exercises in his department. 



Page Twenty-five 



(vlL>(e^ 



VETERANS EDUCATION 

The College is approved for the education of Veterans under 
the GI Bill of Rights and Public Law 16. Accordingly it is the 
policy of the school to afford these men every opportunity for study 
compatible with their educational background and the scope of the 
institution. 

Full credit will be given for courses and training completed in 
military service. In this matter the college will be guided by the 
American Council on Education in its publication entitled, Guide 
to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services. 

Special guidance is provided for the veterans and special facili- 
ties are offered for their admission by examination when their high 
school course was interrupted by war service. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

As college education is accomplished not only during the hours 
of class but also in no small degree during the students' inter- 
change of ideas at other periods, the College heartily encourages 
all student organizations which help to develop in the student initia- 
tive, self-reliance and leadership in organized religious and social 
movements, qualities which are expected of college men generally. 

PRINCIPLE STUDENT GROUPS 

Student Council 

This is the co-ordinating group for all the campus organizations. Repre- 
sentation on the council is enjoyed by all the recognized clubs. The President 
of the Council is elected by the student-body and represents them in all peti- 
tions to the faculty. 

Sodality of the Immaculate Conception 

The Sodality began its work at Spring Hill in 1847 and has never ceased 
to represent the loyalty of the students to the Mother of God. Regular meet- 
ings are held, and various works of zeal and charity undertaken under the 
sponsorship of this organization. Closely connected with the Sodality are the 
Apostleship of Prayer, and the St. John Berchmans Sanctuary Society, the one 
fostering the ideal of reparation, and the other the liturgical movement. 

Alpha Sigma Nu 

This is the Jesuit Honor Fraternity open to those holding highest academic 
rank in the Senior class. 

Page Twenty-six 



Portier Debating Academy 

The purpose of this organization, named for the founder of the college, 
is to foster forensics. From its ranks the intercollegiate debating team is 
usually chosen. 

The Yenni Dramatic Society 

This society, an offshoot of the Portier in 1935, aims to develop a prac- 
tical interest in the drama. 

Beta Beta Beta 

This national fraternity in biology has a very active chapter at Spring Hill. 
Meetings are held twice a month, with guest speakers a frequent attraction. 
The Mendelian is published monthly by the group. 

International Relations Club 

The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace approved in 1940 the 
opening of this campus club at Spring Hill. The purpose of its monthly 
meetings is to enlighten student opinion on world affairs. A special library 
is maintained. 

Philomelic Academy 

This youngest organization on the Spring Hill campus is devoted to the 
study and appreciation of classical as well as modern music masters. Its meet- 
ings and auditions are open to the public. 

Publications 

In normal times the students publish, under faculty supervision, the fol- 
lowing publications: 

The SPRINGHILLIAN, the fortnightly newspaper of campus activities 
and opinions. 

The SPRING HILL QUARTERLY, a literary magazine. 

The SPRING HILL S BOOK, a Manual for Freshmen. 

Veterans Club 

This organization came into being in 1946 when the more than a hundred 
veterans of World War II studying at Spring Hill under the GI Bill of Rights 
decided to band together to promote their social and academic welfare. The 
group is independent, unaffiliated with any national organization. 



ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

In intercollegiate athletic competition, Spring Hill is a mem- 
ber of the newly-formed Gulf States Conference, composed of col- 
leges in Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, and its athletic teams 

Page Twenty-seven 



engage those of other colleges in basketball, baseball, tennis and 
golf. 

Intramural sports play an adequate part in the extra-curricular 
life of the student body at Spring Hill. Facilities for various sea- 
sonal intramural sports are available on the campus. Conducted 
on an optional basis, the teams represent various student groups in 
touch-football, basketball and softball. Off-campus intramural 
athletics include among others, a bowling league. Trophies are 
provided for the winners in the various intramural sports. 

Tennis courts, an eighteen-hole golf course and a large spring- 
fed lake are other facilities offered for student participation in 
athletic activity. 



Page Twenty-eight 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



SESSIONS 



The school year begins in the middle of September and ends 
in the beginning of June. The year is divided into two semesters 
of sessions of eighteen weeks each. The first semester ends during 
the last week of January. The second begins immediately there- 
after, without mid-year holidays. 



ATTENDANCE 

Since the purpose of college education is not only to impart 
information and develop the mental faculties, but also, if not chiefly 
to train the student in habits of punctuality and fidelity to duty, 
prompt attendance at all class meetings is constantly stressed, and 
the co-operation of parents and guardians in this important mat- 
ter is earnestly requested. The date of registration and the limits 
of the various holiday periods are clearly stated in this catalogue, 
and will be strictly adhered to. 

While it is left to the discretion of the Dean to grant excuse 
for class absence in the case of sickness or similarly grave cause, 
the responsibility for absence ordinarily rests with the student. It 
is to his interest to see that unauthorized absence from any course 
does not exceed the number of semester hour credits allowed for 
that course. The penalty for such excessive absence is that the stu- 
dent's registration in such courses will be automatically cancelled, 
and accordingly no credit given for the course. In special cases, the 
delinquent may be reinstated by the Committee on Appeals upon 
written recommendation of his Instructor. Absences immediately 
preceding and following holiday periods count double. 

Tardiness in class attendance is regarded as a partial absence. 
Three tardy marks will constitute one cut. Tardiness of more than 
fifteen minutes is considered absence. No absences from laboratory 

Page Twenty-nine 



are excused. Laboratory work missed must be made up at the 
hours assigned by the Instructor, and these extra laboratory periods 
are subject to a special fee (see Fees and Expenses). 

AMOUNT OF WORK 

The semester hour is the unit of standard for computing the 
amount of student's work. A semester hour is defined as one lec- 
ture, recitation or class exercise, one hour in length per week, for 
one semester. Two hours of laboratory work are equivalent to one 
recitation hour. Two hours of preparation on the part of the stu- 
dent is supposed for each lecture or recitation. In general one 
credit hour represents for the average student ordinarily about 
three hours of actual work each week throughout one semester, 
divided appropriately between lecture or laboratory period and 
out-of-class preparation. 

A normal student load is from sixteen to eighteen hours per 
week. No candidate for a degree will be allowed to register for 
fewer than twelve or more than nineteen. Exceptions may be made 
by the Dean for Honor Students. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Examinations in all subjects are held at the end of each semes- 
ter. Besides, there are intra-semestral tests. The semester examina- 
tion, together with the average of the months preceding, determines 
the standing of a student for the semester. If a student, on account 
of sickness or any other cause, misses a written test or examination 
in any subject, he will be required to make it up. 

A grade of D is required for passing in each subject. Condi- 
tions may be incurred by failure to satisfy the requirements of any 
course, which requirements include the recitations, tests, and other 
assigned work. Conditions due to failure in a monthly test or in a j 
semester examination, may be removed by a supplementary test or 
examination. The supplementary examinations are held, upon 
recommendation of the department concerned with the approval 
of the Dean of the college, during the first month of the succeed- 1| 
ing semester. They may be taken only on the days specified, and 
may not be deferred, except with the express consent of the Dean. 
For each subject a fee is charged, payable in advance to the Treas- 
urer of the college. Removal of conditions by examination shall 

Page Thirty 



not entitle the student to a grade higher than D. A condition due 
to failure to complete assigned work may be removed by making 
up the required work. This ordinarily entails a fine of one dollar. 

POOR SCHOLARSHIP — DISMISSAL 

Failure to pass at least three courses in any semester renders a 
student liable to dismissal for poor scholarship. Exception to this 
rule is made only for weighty reasons. 

Low grades and neglect of work within the semester render a 
student liable to probation, including exclusion from extra-curricu- 
lar activities; and failure to improve will entail reduction of sched- 
ule with a permanent record of failure in the subject cancelled. 

A test in proficiency in English will be given all Sophomores. 
Should any prove unsatisfactory, they will be required to take a 
course in remedial English. Passing this course by the beginning 
of their last semester is a condition of graduation. 

STUDENT RANKING 

Those students are ranked as Sophomores who have at least 
twenty-four credit hours and points and have completed the pre- 
scribed courses of Freshman year; Juniors, those who have fifty- 
six credits and points and have completed the prescribed courses 
of the Sophomore year; Seniors, those who have ninety-two credit 
hours and points and have completed the prescribed courses of the 
Junior year. 

REPORTS 

At least four times a year, i.e., in November, January, April and 
July detailed reports of scholarship and conduct are issued from the 
Dean's office. At other times also similar reports will be furnished 
to interested parents or guardians upon request. 

WITHDRAWAL 

Students who for any reason withdraw from college during 
the semester must give previous notice to the Registrar. Failure 
to do this within reasonable time will incur forfeiture of right 
to an honorable dismissal. 

Page Thirty-one 



TRANSCRIPT OF RECORD 



Students wishing transcript of records in order to transfer from 
this college to another, or for any other purpose, should make 
early and seasonable application for the same. No statements will 
be made out during the busy periods of examinations and regis- 
trations. The first transcript of record is furnished free. For each 
additional copy there is a charge of one dollar. 



PART-TIME COURSES 

For the convenience of teachers and others who have satisfied 
the requirements of college entrance, the College offers special 
courses in college subjects leading to the various bachelor degrees. 
Students who have not satisfied the requirements for college en- 
trance also may enroll in these courses for the cultural value and 
general information to be gained thereby, but credit will not be 
granted until the proper entrance credentials have been approved 
and filed. 

This part-time work is offered in Summer Session, in a Satur- 
day morning course, and in Special Courses for Nurses. 

Summer Session 

The Summer Session runs for six weeks for a maximum of 
eight semester hours. The bulletin of this session is published in 
April. 

The dates of the 1949 summer session are June 13th to July 22nd. 

Saturday Courses 

On Saturdays from 8:30 to 12:30 courses are given on the col- 
lege campus during a full year of thirty-four weeks. The length 
of the periods is so arranged that students may gain three semester 
hours credit in a subject by taking it through the year, or by taking 
a double period through the semester. The maximum number of 
credits is nine for the year's work. 

The Saturday Classes for 1949-50 begin on September 24th and 
close on May 27th. The tuition is $7.50 per semester hour. 

Page Thirty-two 



Nurses Courses 

For the student nurses of the Nursing Schools of City Hospital 
and Providence Hospital of Mobile, special courses are offered in 
Biology, Chemistry, Philosophy, Psychology, Religion and Soci- 
ology. By special arrangement these courses are also open to other 
Iqualified students on a part-time basis. 

The Nurses' courses begin the fourth Monday in September 
jand continue through the year till the third Saturday in May, with 
the usual holidays indicated in the College Calendar. 



Page Thirty-three 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

The conditions for the Baccalaureate degrees are the following: 

1. The satisfactory completion of the four years' course leading to the 
degree for which the student is a candidate. 

2. In order to be accepted in fulfillment of any requirement for the 
degree, all work must be completed with a grade of D or over, and the 
general average of the work be of Grade C or above, giving a quality quotient 
of 1. 

3. At the end of his Senior year the student must pass a comprehensive 
examination on the various courses offered as a major. Candidates for honors 
must also present an acceptable thesis for the approval of the Dean. 

4. The Senior year (or 24 of the last 30 credit hours) must be made 
at Spring Hill College. 

5. A graduation fee of fifteen dollars, payable in advance, and the settle- 
ment of all indebtedness to the College. 

All applicants for a degree must file their applications and 
present all their credits and the evidence of having met all require- 
ments listed above, on or before the first of April. 

QUALITY POINTS 

A candidate for a degree must gain not only the number of 
credits required, but his work must reach a certain standard of 
excellence. In addition to the 128 hours credit necessary for gradu- 
ation, each student must earn at least 128 quality points, or an 
average mark in all subjects of C or better. 

No student will be advanced to candidacy for any collegiate 
degree whose credit points do not equal his semester hours at the 
beginning of his last semester. 

Page Thirty-jour 



The following system of grading is used. Each semester hour 
of credit is valued as follows: 

A excellent, with 3 quality points per hour of credit. 

B good, with 2 quality points per hour of credit. 

C fair, with 1 quality point per hour of credit. 

D deficient, but passed without quality points. 

E not passed, but entitled to re-examination for passing grade. 

F failed without right to re-examination. 

The student should note that the grade D indicates unsatisfac- 
tory wor\. 

MAJOR AND MINOR SEQUENCE 

There must be completed a Major Sequence of at least twenty- 
four hours in some subject (or at the discretion of the professor 
concerned and with the approval of the Dean, in some closely 
related group of subjects) and a minor Sequence of at least 
eighteen hours. 

A major may be changed only by the consent of the Dean 
and the heads of the departments concerned, and such change will 
be permitted only upon the distinct understanding that all the 
courses prescribed in the major finally chosen shall be completed 
before graduation. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Honors at graduation are granted on the basis of quality points 
in their ratio to the total number of credit hours carried. Thus, 
for example, a student who consistently made A in all his sub- 
jects of a 128-hour program would have 384 quality points for a 
quality quotient of 3. The honors to be inscribed on the diplomas, 
! read at commencement, and published in the lists of graduates are 
awarded on the following scale: Maxima cum laude for a quality 
quotient of 2.9; Magna cum laude for a quality quotient of 2.7; 
Cum laude for a quality quotient of 2.5. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

To encourage the better qualified students to independent work 
and to assist them in integrating their knowledge in a particular 

Page Thirty -five 



field of concentration, a special honors program was inaugurated 
with the Junior Class of 1940. Eligible upon approval of the Dean 
are those students who have a quality quotient of 2.0 or better at 
the end of their Sophomore year. Upon registering for the honors 
program, these students will be assigned a tutor who will arrange 
for each one a special program in his chosen field, including at 
least 18 semester hours of upper division work in one department 
and 15 more in related fields. A great part of this work will be 
done by reading and conference, while class attendance for the 
honor student is at the discretion of the tutor. At the end of his 
course, the honors students must pass a special comprehensive ex- 
amination, both oral and written on his special field in its entirety. 
Upon the results will depend his graduation with first honors, with 
second honors, or merely with passing grade. 

REQUIRED SUBJECTS FOR VARIOUS DEGREES 

Prescribed for the A.B. Degree: 

Latin (16), Greek or Modern Language (6-12), English (12), Science 

(8), Mathematics (6), History (6), Religion (8), Logic (3), Metaphysics 
(6), Psychology (3), Ethics (6), History of Philosophy (2), Sociology (6), 
Public Speaking (2). 

Prescribed for the B.S. Degree (Social Sciences): 

Modern Language (6-12), English (12), Science or Mathematics (6), 
History (6), Political Science (6), Economics (6), Religion (8), Logic (3), 
Metaphysics (6), Ethics (6), Sociology (6), Public Speaking (2), Psychol- 
ogy ( 3 )- 

Prescribed for the B.S. Degree (Natural Sciences): 

Chemistry (8), Physics (8), Mathematics (6-16), English (12), Modern 
Language (6-12), History (6), Logic (3), Metaphysics (6), Ethics (6), Psy- 
chology (3), Religion (8). 

Prescribed for the B.S. Degree (Commerce): 

Mathematics (6), Business Law (6), English (12), History (6), Language 
(6-12), Public Speaking (2), Religion (8), Logic (3), Metaphysics (6), Psy- 
chology (3), Ethics (6). 



Page Thirty-six 



FEES AND EXPENSES 



BASIC FEES: 

For all students: 

tuition: 

Regular session per semester $125.00 

Summer session per credit hour 7.50 

activity fee: 

Regular session per semester 25.00 

Summer session 5.00 

For boarding students only: 

board : 

Regular session per semester 168.00 

Summer session 60.00 

ROOM AND LAUNDRY: 

Regular session per semester 75.00 

Summer session 25.00 

medical fee: 

Regular session per semester 5.00 

Summer session 5.00 

For new students only: 

Matriculation Fee 10.00 

Room Deposit (Boarding students only) 10.00 

SPECIAL FEES (payable each semester where required) : 

Science Laboratory (for each course) 7.50 

Laboratory Breakage Deposit (refundable) 5.00 

Accounting Laboratory 5.00 

Surveying 5.00 

C. P. A. Review Course 40.00 

Page Thirty-seven 



MISCELLANEOUS FEES: 

Conditional Examination (on day assigned) 2.00 

Conditional Examination (on special day) 5.00 

Special Tutoring (per hour) 3.00 

Make-up Laboratory Period (each) 2.00 

Duplicate Transcript of Credit 1.00 

Fee for Late Registration 5.00 

Golf Membership Fee (per semester) 12.00 

Graduation Fee (payable final year only) 15.00 

National Teacher Examination 4.50 

MUSIC FEES (per semester) 

Voice and instrumental lessons one hour a wee\ 45.00 

Use of piano one hour daily 5.00 

Use of organ one hour daily.. 25.00 

Activities Fee includes use of the library, entertainments and lectures 
provided by the College authorities, student publications, athletic contests, 
both intercollegiate and intra-mural and courses in physical education. 

Rooms are shared by two occupants. They are equipped with lavatory 
and toilet and are supplied with hot and cold water and all necessary heavy 
furnishings. Students supply their own toilet linen, rugs and whatever dec- 
orations are appropriate. 

Medical Fee takes care of medical attention by the Staff Physician and 
ordinary nursing in the College Infirmary not in excess of ten days. 

Matriculation Fee, as indicated above, is payable on first entrance only. 

Room Deposit, which must accompany each application for entrance is 
not applied to room rent but is retained to cover any damage beyond reason- 
able wear which may be done to the room or its furnishings while occupied 
by the students. The balance is returned to the parents when the student 
withdraws from the College. In case a student fails to occupy a room after 
reservation, the deposit will not be returned, unless notice of withdrawal is 
received one month before scheduled occupancy of room. 

REGULATIONS OF THE TREASURER 

All checks should be made payable to SPRING HILL COL- 
LEGE and addressed directly to the Treasurer's Office. Because 
of Mobile bank regulations, it is requested that Cashier's Checks 
or Exchange Checks be sent, rather than Personal Checks. A charge 
of ten cents per fifty dollars will be added to personal checks. 
Those desiring to send Postal Money Orders should have them 
drawn on the Mobile Post Office. Payments made from countries 
outside continental United States should be made payable in New 
York or New Orleans exchange. 

Page Thirty-eight 



All minor expenses, for books, stationery, etc., are on a strictly 
cash basis. Money for the personal accounts should be sent directly 
to the student, who alone will be responsible to the parents or 
guardians for an itemized statement of expenditures. This money 
may be deposited for safe keeping with the Treasurer, but in this 
case parents must state in writing a definite amount for weekly 
withdrawals by the student. No advance of money will ever be 
made at any time for any purpose whatever. In case of emergency, 
students should have money wired to them. 

If a student is withdrawn before the end of the semester, no 
deductions will be made. Should, however, a student leave on ac- 
count of prolonged illness, or be dismissed honorably, a deduction 
for board and room rental, but not for tuition and fees, will be 
made for the remainder of the semester, beginning with the first 
of the following month. The date on which notice is received by 
the Treasurer from the Registrar s Office is considered the date of 
withdrawal. 

No student may have an honorable dismissal nor will he be 
given credit for his studies or be admitted to the examination in 
January or May until all indebtedness to the College has been 
settled. 

The College will not be responsible for books, clothing, jewelry 
or any other articles possessed by the student while in school or 
left by him at his departure. 

Students' visitors who stay at the College will be charged for 
board and lodging at the rate of $2.50 per day. 

Refunds, when due, are made only to parents or guardians of 
the student, unless the College be instructed in writing by parent 
or guardian to make the refund to the student. 

PLAN OF PAYMENTS 

Although the general regulation calls for payment in two in- 
stallments, the College offers the following alternative: Payment 
may be made in monthly installments in advance. An extra charge 
of $5.00 will be added, should parents or guardians elect to pay on 
the monthly plan. This charge will be made and is payable with 
the first monthly installment. 

Special arrangements for any other alternative plan of payments 
or possible reduction in the case of brothers, must be made before 
the opening classes with the Treasurer. 

Page Thirty-nine 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT AID 



Realizing the importance of substantial aid in the encourage- 
ment of deserving students, far-seeing friends of the College have 
from time to time set aside funds for the establishment of scholar- 
ships. A perpetual scholarship is established by the gift of funds 
whose interest will yield a sum sufficient to pay tuition at least in 
part. To cover the entire yearly cost of tuition an endowment of 
$5,000 is required. An annual scholarship is provided by the yearly 
donation of $250. 

Perpetual Scholarships 

The LITTLE FLOWER SCHOLARSHIP. This scholarship is worth 
$200 annually. 

The SAINT IGNATIUS SCHOLARSHIP. 

The CHARLES P. MILLER GOLD STAR SCHOLARSHIP, founded 
by his mother in memory of this member of the class of 1938, who gave his 
life for his country in World War II. 

The McGILL SCHOLARSHIP (formerly the Spring Hill High School 
Scholarship) is awarded annually to the graduate of McGill Institute, Mobile, 
who wins the highest honors of his class. It carries remittance of tuition fees 
for the student's course. 

The CHRISTIAN BROTHERS SCHOLARSHIP is awarded under the 
same conditions as the preceding one to the honor graduate of Christian 
Brothers' College, Memphis, Tennessee. 

The JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIPS are granted to the 
honor graduate of each of the High Schools of the New Orleans Province 
of the Society of Jesus, namely, Jesuit High School of New Orleans, Jesuit 
High School of Dallas, Jesuit High School of Tampa, St. John's High School 
of Shreveport. 

Finally, a restricted number of SPRING HILL COLLEGE SCHOLAR- 
SHIPS will be granted by the college annually. Applications for these 
scholarships must be made to the Dean before August 1st. These scholarships 
are awarded on the basis of proven need and high academic standing. 

Page Forty 



Self Aid 

A certain number of student assistantships and clerical positions 
are open annually to deserving students. Students wishing to profit 
by such financial aid should apply to the Dean before May 15th. 

Conditions of Tenure 

A student receiving assistance through scholarship or college 
employment is expected to maintain a scholastic standing which in 
the judgment of the college authorities gives evidence that he is 
making the most of his abilities and opportunities. A mediocre, 
though passing, record in any semester raises for consideration the 
question of continuance of financial assistance. It is clear that the 
student receiving aid must be regular in attendance at his college 
exercises and also must maintain a record of good conduct. 



Page Forty-one 



PRIZES AND TROPHIES 



To encourage the students of Spring Hill College in the develop- 
ment of initiative, self-reliance and leadership in various phases of 
college life the following prizes and trophies are awarded in recog- 
nition of outstanding achievement. In most instances the awards 
are made annually. 

THE JOSEPH BLOCK MEMORIAL MEDAL for Music has been founded 
by the children of a former Professor of Music at the college; viz., Edward 
Block of New York; Alexander Block, Mrs. Bettie Haas, Mrs. Emma 
Eichold and Mrs. Francis B. Simon of Mobile. 
This medal was awarded to Murray Clayton. 

THE BISHOP O'SULLIVAN MEMORIAL MEDAL is awarded for ex- 
cellence in Christian Doctrine and Ecclesiastical History. 
This medal was not awarded. 

THE HUTCHISON MEDAL, founded by Miller Reese Hutchison is 
awarded to the writer of the best thesis in Philosophy. 
This medal was awarded to Louis Roberts. 

THE MERILH MEDAL for the best English essay was founded by Edmund 
H. Merilh, B.S., 1917. 

This medal was awarded to Louis Roberts. 

THE WALSH MEMORIAL MEDAL was founded in memory of William 
A. Walsh, A.B., 1908, for excellence in Oratory. 
This medal was awarded to Joseph Canty. 

THE O'CALLAGHAN MEDAL, donated by Rev. J. McDermott, in memory 
of Rev. C. T. O'Callaghan, D.D., for the best paper in Latin. 
This medal was awarded to John Ric\ert. 

THE MASTIN MEDAL, founded by the former physician of the college, 
Dr. William Mastin, is awarded for the best paper in General Chemistry. 
This medal was awarded to A. C. Grantham. 

THE STEWART MEDAL is donated annually by Dr. Dudley M. Stewart, 
B.S., 1923, for the best paper in Biology. 

This medal was awarded to Robert Claw son. 

Page Forty-two 



THE HOUSSIERE MEDAL, founded by Charles, Ernest and Jules Houssiere 
for excellence in mathematics. 

This medal was awarded to John J. McEvoy. 

THE FAULK MEDAL, donated by Ward C. Faulk for the highest honors 
of the Bachelor of Science in Commerce degree. 
This medal was awarded to James P. Morgan. 

THE LANGE MEDAL, founded by Mrs. Louis A. Lange of New Orleans, 
is awarded for excellence in Accounting. 
This medal was not awarded. 

THE ALLEN MEDAL, founded by the Most Reverend Edward P. Allen, 
former Bishop of Mobile, is awarded by the votes of the students to the 
one excelling in deportment. 

This medal was awarded to John Ric\ert. 

THE TOOLEN MEDAL, founded by the Most Reverend Thomas J. Toolen, 
D.D., Bishop of Mobile, to be awarded to the graduate with the highest 
scholastic average for his four years of work. 
This medal was awarded to Louis Roberts. 

THE MATT RICE SERVICE CUP, founded by the Omicron Sigma Fra- 
ternity in memory of Matthew P. Rice, A.B., 1919, a founder of the 
fraternity, is awarded annually to the student, who during the year has 
rendered the greatest service to the college. 
This cup was awarded to Paul Napolitano. 

THE FRESHMAN CUP, founded in 1938 at the silver jubilee reunion of 
the class of 1913 by the following members of the class: Father John J. 
Druhan, S.J., President of the College, Dr. William Barker, Lee A. 
Plauche, Frank Prohaska, and William B. Slattery, is awarded annually 
to the Freshman showing greatest promise of future leadership. 
This cup was awarded to David Littlefield. 

PRIZE OF $25 SECURITY BOND, donated by Mobile Academy of Science 
to outstanding Science Student at Spring Hill College. 
This bond was awarded to George B. Halliday. 

THE FATHER YANCEY MEDAL, donated by Russell E. Morris, Jr., B.S., 
1945, is awarded for the best piece of original undergraduate research in 
biology. 

This medal is to be awarded for the first time at the 1949 Commence- 
ment. 



Page Forty-three 



GIFTS AND BEQUESTS 



As a private institution of higher learning, SPRING HILL 
COLLEGE must look to its friends and benefactors and to all 
whose bounty is on occasion devoted to the cause of education for 
the generous contributions which will enable the College to carry 
on its work of education, to provide an increase in the aid to de- 
serving students, and to extend its contribution to the spread of 
knowledge and truth. Gifts to the College may take the form of 
funds for the establishment of scholarships or professorships, of 
additions to the material equipment or library collections, of con- 
tributions to the general endowment fund, or may be undesig- 
nated. Those desiring to make a bequest to Spring Hill in their 
wills may be helped by the following suggested form: 

LEGAL FORM FOR BEQUEST 

/ give (devise) and bequeath to Spring Hill College, an institution incor- 
porated under the laws of the State of Alabama, and located at Spring Hill, 

Mobile County, Alabama, its successors forever, the sum of 

Dollars (or otherwise describe the gift) for its general corporate purpose 
(or name a particular corporate purpose). 



Page Forty-jour 



PROGRAMS OF CURRICULA 

AND 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 




PROGRAMS OF CURRICULA 



A program of studies should be something unified and con- 
structive, not a mere miscellaneous assortment of courses of in- 
struction. In order to be constructive, the program must have 
some directing principle and some clear objective. 

Although there are students who, when they enter college, have 
not made up their minds with any degree of certainty as to the 
career that they intend to follow, this does not mean that even 
their program cannot be constructive. In any instance the direct- 
ing principle of a well-planned program of studies should not be 
chiefly vocational. A student who intends to study medicine will 
naturally see that he includes all those subjects which the medical 
schools require for admission, but in addition he should not forget 
that a good doctor must also be a good human being and that 
he needs besides his specialized medical knowledge a wide range 
of interests and cultivated tastes. The best medical schools prefer 
candidates who have not had a narrowly specialized training in 
college. Similarly, a student who is planning to go into law or 
engineering should not try to limit himself in college to subjects 
which appear to be immediately contributory to legal or engineer- 
ing studies. A student, when making his choice of program, must 
realize that presumably he has before himself a lifetime of neces- 
sary specialization, but only three or four years of freedom in which 
to study the interrelation of ideas and knowledge, to broaden his 
intellectual interests and human sympathies, to fit himself to take 
his part as an intelligent man in the social, economic, political and 
religious order that lies ahead of him. 

The ideal college education should prepare a man to live — 
physically, mentally and spiritually — up to his fullest capacity, to 
cooperate with and understand other men while still preserving 
the integrity of his own individual character, to establish for him- 
self standards of thinking and conduct which shall give direction 

Page Fort-seven 



to all his activities, to see new possibilities in existing conditions of 
life and to adapt himself to other conditions in which he may find 
himself in the future. An education so conceived is what is called a 
liberal education as opposed to an education restricted to vocational 
training. In a liberal education mathematics and the sciences, 
literature and the other arts, history, philosophy and religion are 
studied as means to liberalizing the human spirit, to freeing a man 
from the narrowing restrictions of a single environment and the 
single age in which he lives. An adequate knowledge of the past 
is our only means of acquiring the necessary experience with which 
to meet the future. Such an education as is described here can 
prepare a man adequately for the privileges and the responsibilities 
of citizenship in the world of today. 

The programs of curricula listed below are designed to assist 
the student in the achievement of the goals outlined above. 

For convenience of reference these programs of curricula are 
listed in some detail. Numbers in parentheses indicate semester 
hours of credit required in various subjects. Special attention is 
called to the following requirement, applicable in all instances 
where modern language study is part of the curriculum, either 
academic or professional: Those who take an Elementary Modern 
Language in Freshman year are obliged to continue the same 
language in Sophomore year; the degree requirement is successful 
passing of a reading test given after the Intermediate course. 



A B ACADEMIC CURRICULA 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Latin (4), Greek or Modern Language (3), English (3), Mathematics 
(3), Science (4), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Latin (4), Greek or Modern Language (3), English (3), Mathe- 
matics (3), Science (4), Religion (1). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Latin (4), Greek or Modern Language (3), English Literature (3), 
Sociology (3), Logic (3), Speech (2), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Latin (4), Greek or Modern Language (3), English Literature (3), 
Sociology (3), Metaphysics (3), Art (2), Religion (1). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Psychology (3), History (3), Religion (1), Major and Minor Elec- 
tees (9). 

Second semester: Theodicy (3), History (3), Religion (1), Major and Minor Elec- 
tives (9). 

Page Forty -eight 



SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Ethics (3), History of Philosophy (2), Religion (1), Major and Minor 
Electives (9). 

Second semester: Ethics (3), Religion (1), Major and Minor Electives (9). 



B.S. (Biology) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: General Biology or Botany (4), Chemistry (4), French or German (3), 
English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: General Biology or Zoology (4), Chemistry (4), French or German 
(3), English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (1). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), General Physics (4), Qualitative Chemistry (4), French 
j or German (3), Logic (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Biology (4), Physics (4), Quantitative Chemistry (4), French or 
German (3), Metaphysics (3), Religion (1). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), Organic Chemistry (4), Psychology (3), English (3), 
History (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Biology (4), Organic Chemistry (4), Theodicy (3), English (3), 
History (3), Religion (1). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Biology (6), Physical Chemistry (4), Ethics (3), Religion (1), Elec- 
tives (2). 

Second semester: Biology (4), History and Philosophy of Biology (2), Ethics (3), 
Religion (1), Electives (4). 



B.S. (Chemistry) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: General Inorganic Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), Mod- 
ern Language (3), Drawing (2), Religion (1). 

Second semester: General Inorganic Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), 
Modern Language (3), Drawing (2), Religion (1). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Qualitative Analysis (4), Physics (4), Modern Language (3), Logic (3), 
History (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Quantitative Analysis (4), Physics (4), Modern Language (3), Meta- 
physics (3), History (3), Religion (1). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Organic Chemistry (4), Psychology (3), English (3), Religion (1), 
Mathematics or Biology (4). 

Second semester: Organic Chemistry (4), Theodicy (3), English (3), Religion (1), 
Mathematics or Biology (4). 

Page Forty-nine 



SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Physical Chemistry (3), Quantitative Analysis (4) or Physiological 
Chemistry (3), Ethics (3), Religion (1), Electives (6). 

Second semester: Physical Chemistry (3), Quantitative Analysis (4) or Physiological 
Chemistry (3), Ethics (3), Religion (1), Electives (6). 

B.S. (Mathematics) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Mathematics (4), Chemistry (4), English (3), French or German (3), 
Religion (1). 

Second semester: Mathematics (4), Chemistry (4), English (3), French or German (3), 
Religion (1). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Calculus I (4), Mechanics and Heat (4), Physical Measurements (2), 
Logic (3), French or German (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Calculus II (4), Light, Sound and Electricity (4), Physical Measure- 
ments (2), Metaphysics (3), French or German (3), Religion (1). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Mathematics (3), Psychology (3), English (3), Religion (1), History 
(3), Minor Electives (5). 

Second semester: Mathematics (3), Theodicy (3), English (3), Religion (1), History 
(3), Minor Electives (5). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Mathematics (3), Ethics (3), Religion (1), Electives (9). 
Second semester: Mathematics (3), Ethics (3), Religion (1), Electives (9). 

B.S. (Physics) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (4), French or German (3), 
Religion (1). 

Second semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (4), French or German (3), 
Religion (1). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Mechanics and Heat (4), Physical Measurements (2), Calculus I (4), 
Logic (3), Religion (1), French or German (3). 

Second semester: Light, Sound and Electricity (4), Physical Measurements (2), Cal- 
culus II (4), Logic (3), Religion (1), French or German (3). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Physics (5), Differential Equations (3), English (3), Psychology (3), 
History (3), Religion (1)., 

Second semester: Physics (5), English (3), Theodicy (3), History (3), Religion (1), 
Elective (Mathematics suggested) (3). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Theoretical Physics I (3), Ethics (3), Religion (1), Electives (8). 
Second semester: Theoretical Physics II (3), Ethics (3), Religion (1), Electives (8). 

Page Fifty 



j B.S. (Social Science) 

j FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Modern Language (3), Science or Mathematics (3-4), English (3), 
I History (3), Sociology or Political Science (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Modern Language (3), Science or Mathematics (3-4), English (3), 
I History (3), Sociology or Political Science (3), Religion (1). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Modern Language (3), English (3), Logic (3), Economics (3), Soci- 
[ ology or Political Science (3), Public Speaking (2), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Modern Language (3), English (3), Metaphysics (3), Economics (3), 
Sociology or Political Science (3), Public Speaking (2), Religion (1). 

j JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Philosophy (3), Religion (1), Major and Minor Electives (12). 
Second semester: Philosophy (3), Religion (1), Major and Minor Electives (12). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Ethics (3), Religion (1), Major and Minor Electives (9). 
Second semester: Ethics (3), Religion (1), Major and Minor Electives (9). 

B.S. (Commerce) 

General Program for Freshman and Sophomore Years 
FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Algebra (3), Elementary Accounting (3), English Composition (3), 
Modern Language (3), History (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Trigonometry (3), Elementary Accounting (3), English Composition 
(3), Modern Language (3), History (3), Religion (1). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Intermediate Accounting (3), Economics (3), Business Law (3), Mod- 
ern Language (3), Logic (3), Religion (1), English Literature (3). 

Second semester: Intermediate Accounting (3), Economics (3), Business Law (3), 
Modern Language (3), Metaphysics (3), Religion (1), English Literature (3). 

Major in Accounting 
JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Accounting Problems (3), Cost Accounting (3), Money and Banking 
(3), Marketing (3), Psychology (3), Public Speaking (2), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Accounting Problems (3), Accounting Systems (3), Public Finance 
(3), Industrial Management (3), Theodicy (3), Report Writing (2), Religion (1). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Elementary Auditing (3), Income Tax Procedure (3), Corporation 
Finance (3), General Ethics (3), Business Administration or Economics Elective (3), Ac- 
counting Elective (2), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Advanced Auditing (3), Income Tax Procedure (3), Credit Man- 
agement (3), Special Ethics (3), Business Administration or Economics Elective (3), Ac- 
counting Elective (2), Religion (1). 



THE THOMAS BYRNE 
MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

SP*INO Mill COllCGt 
SPRING Hltt. ALA. 



Page Fifty-one 



Major in Banking and Finance 
JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Money and Banking (3), Insurance (3), Marketing (3), Business 
Cycles (3), Religion (1), Public Speaking (2). 

Second semester: Public Finance (3), Real Estate (3), Credit Management (3), Sta- 
tistics (3), Theodicy (3), Religion (1), Report Writing (2). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Bank Administration (3), Advanced Monetary Theory (3), Corpora- 
tion Finance (3), Business Administration Elective (3), General Ethics (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Bank Administration (3), Investments (3), International Trade (3), 
Business Administration Elective (3), Special Ethics (3), Religion (1). 

Major in Economics 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Psychology (3), Religion (1), Economic Analysis (3), Money and 
Banking (3), Minor Elective (3), Sociology (3), Public Speaking (2). 

Second semester: Theodicy (3), Religion (1), Economic Analysis (3), Statistics (3), 
Minor Elective (3), Sociology (3), Report Writing (2). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: General Ethics (3), Religion (1), Major Elective (3), Minor Elective 
(3), Cultural Elective (3). 

Second semester: Special Ethics (3), Religion (1), Major Elective (3), Minor Elec- 
tive (3), Cultural Elective (3) 

Major in General Business 
JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Money and Banking (3), Marketing (3), Business Administration Elec- 
tive (3), Accounting or Economics Elective (3) Psychology (3), Religion (1), Public 
Speaking (2). 

Second semester: Industrial Management (3), Credit Management (3), Business Ad- 
ministration Elective (3), Accounting or Economics Elective (3), Theodicy (3), Religion 
(1), Report Writing (2). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Corporation Finance (3), Business Cycles (3), Business Administration 
Elective (3), Business Administration Elective (3), General Ethics (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Statistics (3), Investments (3), Business Administration Elective 
(3), Business Administration Elective (3), Special Ethics (3), Religion (1). 

Major in Industrial Management 
JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Labor Problems (3), Time and Motion Study (3), Corporation Finance 
(3), Marketing (3), Psychology (3), Religion (1), Public Speaking (2). 

Second semester: Personnel Management (3), Manufacturing Industries (3), Statistics 
(3), Wholesaling (3), Theodicy (3), Religion (1), Report Writing (2). 



Page Fifty-two "2 

IWY8 8AMOMT 

lAftau jaw>* 






SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Industrial Management Problems (3), Cost Accounting (3), Money 
and Banking (3), Business Administration Elective (3), General Ethics (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Industrial Management Problems (3), Advanced Cost Accounting 
(3), Purchasing (3), Business Administration Elective (3), Special Ethics (3), Religion (1). 

Major in Merchandising 
JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Marketing (3), Money and Banking (3), Corporation Finance (3), 
Labor Problems (3), Psychology (3), Religion (1), Public Speaking (2). 

Second semester: Purchasing (3), Credit Management (3), Industrial Management (3), 
International Trade (3), Theodicy (3), Religion (1), Report Writing (2). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Retailing Problems (3), Advertising (3), Business Cycles (3), Business 
Administration Elective (3), Ethics (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Retailing Problems (3), Salesmanship (3), Wholesaling (3), Sta- 
tistics (3), Ethics (3), Religion (1). 

Composite Departmental Major for F re-legal Training 
JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: English Literature (3), Corporation Finance (3), Elective (3), Soci- 
ology (3), Psychology (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: English Literature (3), Public Finance (3), Elective (3), Sociology 
(3), Theodicy (3), Religion (1). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Labor Problems (3), Income Tax Procedure (3), Political Science (3), 
Advanced Speech (3), Ethics (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Labor Law (3), Income Tax Procedure (3), Political Science (3), 
Advanced Speech (3), Ethics (3), Religion (1). 



PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 
ENGINEERING COURSE 

While SPRING HILL COLLEGE does not have the facilities for a 
complete engineering course in any of its various branches, yet it can and 
does give basic, fundamental instruction common to all branches of engineer- 
ing. The modern undergraduate engineering program requires of the pros- 
pective engineer an ever-increasing competence in and understanding of the 
facts and principles of mathematics, physics and chemistry and those other 
natural sciences directly related to the branch of engineering which he plans 
to enter. 

The better high schools will, in general, provide suitable preparation to 
the student who takes full advantage of the opportunities which these schools 
afford. The prospective engineering candidate should bear in mind that the 

Page Fifty -three 



wider his intellectual development and the more extensive his attainments, 
the greater will be the advantages he may expect to gain from his engineer- 
ing study. 

Attention is called particularly to the necessity of thorough preparation 
in English and mathematics. It is presupposed that a candidate's training in 
English will enable him to express his ideas clearly either orally or in writing. 
In mathematics, emphasis should be on a thorough mastery of fundamental 
principles, operations and definitions rather than on covering a wide range 
of subjects. Each applicant for admission to a better grade engineering school 
is expected to have completed (on the high school level before entering upon 
his collegiate preparation) the following specific preparatory subjects: three 
years of English, three years of mathematics (preferably four), and a year 
of physics. The student whose high school training is deficient in these 
subjects should consider seriously the possibility that his vocational choice 
of engineering is ill-advised; such procedure can forestall future disappoint- 
ments. 

Training for the attainment of the objectives of engineering education 
can be begun at SPRING HILL COLLEGE and concluded after transfer to 
a fully-accredited engineering school at the end of one or two years. But 
inasmuch as transfer to and ultimate graduation from an accredited engineer- 
ing school is contingent on other than "just-passing" grades, the prospective 
engineering student is expected to demonstrate by his academic record at 
SPRING HILL a promise of ability to undertake with profit and success 
courses on a higher and a specialized level, otherwise recommendation for 
admission to an engineering school will not be given. 

While it is unquestionably true that the educational requirements and 
standards of engineering schools are constantly becoming more exacting and 
so demand greater capacities and abilities, it is also true that the opportuni- 
ties available to outstanding talent, to the resourceful engineering graduate 
of initiative and special ability, are also increasing. To assist the prospective 
engineering student in securing his fundamental education the following pro- 
gram is presented including the basic requirements in mathematics, physics 
and chemistry and also a few general engineering subjects (e.g. drawing and 
surveying). If the preliminary examination in secondary school mathematics, 
administered upon entrance, indicates deficiencies in the training of the 
prospective engineering student, he may be required to defer certain of his 
freshmen courses, since, for example, admission of any student to college 
algebra is contingent on the results of his mathematics classification test. 
This, evidently, will delay ultimate admission to engineering school and it 
is important that the student recognize this fact before electing an intro- 
ductory engineering program. 

The first two years of engineering training in all branches is nearly uni- 
form and can be substantially secured by the following program. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (4), Engineering Drawing 
(2), Religion (1), General Geology (2). 

Second semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (4), Engineering Draw- 
ing (2), Religion (1), Engineering Problems (2). 

Page Fifty -four 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Calculus I (4), English (3), Mechanics and Heat (4), Physical Meas- 
urements (2), Drawing or Descriptive Geometry (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Calculus II (4), English (3), Sound, Light and Electricity (4), 
Physical Measurements (2), Drawing or Descriptive Geometry (3), Religion (1), Survey- 
ing (3). 

PRE-LEGAL COURSE 

Most law schools admit all applicants who have successfully completed 
two years of a regular college course for a minimum of 60 credit hours. A 
few with higher standards require an A.B. degree. 

The following is a possible two-year program for future law students. 
For the student who looks forward to a possible law career in Industrial 
relations, Labor law, Tax law, Corporation law and the like, the special 
commerce department program for pre-legal training, which leads to a B.S. 
degree in commerce as a preliminary to entrance into law school, should be 
of definite interest. It is listed a few pages earlier in this bulletin. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: History (3), Political Science (3), Language (3), Science or Mathe- 
matics (4), English (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: History (3), Political Science (3), Language (3), Science or Mathe- 
matics (4), English (3), Religion (1). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: History (3), Language (3), Logic (3), Sociology (3), English (3), 
Public Speaking (2), Religion (1). 

Second semester: History (3), Language (3), Philosophy (3), Sociology (3), English 
(3), Public Speaking (2), Religion (1). 

PRE-DENTAL COURSE 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: General Biology (4), Inorganic Chemistry (4), English (3), Modern 
Language (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: General Biology (4), Inorganic Chemistry (4), English (3), Modern 
Language (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (1). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), Organic Chemistry (4), English (3), Modern Language 
(3), Physics (4), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Biology (4), Organic Chemistry (4), English (3), Modern Language 
(3), Physics (4), Religion (1). 

PRE-MEDICAL COURSE 

The minimum requirement for admission to recognized medical schools, 
in addition to the high school requirement, is ninety semester hours of col- 
legiate work extending through three years of at least thirty-two weeks each, 
in a college approved by the Council of Medical Education of the American 
Medical Association. 

Page Fifty -five 



The subjects prescribed for the minimum of three years of college work 
are as follows: 

Chemistry (12), Physics (8), Biology (8), English composition and literature (6), 
Other non-science subjects (12), French or German (8-12). 

Subjects strongly urged: 

Advanced botany or comparative anatomy (3-6), Psychology (3-6), Algebra and 
trigonometry (3-6), Additional courses in chemistry (3-6). 

Other suggested electives: 

English (additional), economics, history, sociology, political science, logic, Latin, Greek, 
drawing. 

The above represents the minimum requirements. It is to serve these 
that the Spring Hill pre-medical program, as oudined below, is designed. 
The ideal preparation for the future doctor and now required by some medi- 
cal schools is the four-year course leading to a B.S., or preferably, an A.B. 
degree. The student in this case, however, should make sure to include in 
his elective studies the courses listed above. 

PRE-MEDICAL PROGRAM 
FIRST YEAR 

First semester: General Biology or Botany (4), General Chemistry (4), French or 
German (3), English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: General Biology or Zoology (4), General Chemistry (4), French or 
German (3), English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (1). 

SECOND YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), Qualitative Chemistry (4), General Physics (4), French 
or German (3), Logic (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Biology (4), Quantitative Chemistry (4), General Physics (4), French 
or German (3), Philosophy (3), Religion (1). 

THIRD YEAR 

First semesters Biology (4), Organic Chemistry (4), Psychology (3), History (3), 
English (3), Religion (1). 

Second semester: Biology (4), Organic Chemistry (4), Theodicy (3), History (3), 
English (3), Religion (1). 

TEACHER TRAINING 

Students who wish to prepare for teaching careers in high school may 
fulfill all requirements for necessary teaching certificates while working on 
their degree programs. The requirements for such certificatoin in the State 
of Alabama are outlined below. 

CLASS B SECONDARY TEMPORARY PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE 

A Class B Secondary Temporary Professional Certificate may be issued 
to a person who presents credentials showing: 

1. That he has graduated with a bachelor's or master's degree from a 
standard institution and has met requirements as prescribed by the State 

Page Fifty-six 



Board of Education for the training of secondary teachers (Spring Hill is 
such an institution); 

2. That he has earned prescribed semester hours credits as follows: Educa- 
tion (18), including Psychology (4-8), Principles and Philosophy (2-6), Elec- 
tives in the field of Secondary Education (4-12), English (12), Social Studies 
(12), including courses, each of which has a credit value from 2 to 4 hours 
in 2 of the following fields: History, Economis, Political Science, Sociology, 
or Geography; Science (6); 

3. That he has to his credit an academic Major of (18) hours in an 
approved subject; 

4. That he has to his credit an academic minor of (12) hours in an 
approved subject. 

A Class B Second Temporary Professional Certificate is valid for a period 
of three years and is the authority of the holder to teach the subjects named 
in its face and other high school subjects as conditions may require. This 
certificate cannot be continued or reinstated. 

If the holder of this certificate expects to continue to teach after it ex- 
pires, he must meet requirements for a Class B Secondary Professional Certifi- 
cate or a Class A Secondary Professional Certificate. 

CLASS B SECONDARY PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE 

To the requirements for the Class B Secondary Temporary Professional 
Certificate the following must be added to obtain a Class B Secondary Pro- 
fessional Certificate : 

1. Education (6), including Psychology (3), Principles and Philosophy 
(2), Materials and Methods of Teaching Major or Minor Subject in High 
School (2-6), Directed Teaching of Major or Minor Subject in High School 
(2-8), Electives in the field of Secondary Education (0-10); 

2. The academic major in approved subject must be 24 semester hours; 

3. The academic minor in approved subject must be 18 semester hours; 

A Class B Secondary Professional Certificate is a conditional permanent 
certificate which is valid in periods of eight years and is the authority of 
the holder to teach the subjects named in its face and other high school 
subjects as conditions may require. 

NATIONAL TEACHER EXAMINATION 

Students enrolled in the Department of Education must take the National 
Teacher Examination sometime during their course, and make the results 
of these examinations a part of their permanent record. The National Teacher 
Examinations are administered annually at Spring Hill College. The special 
student rate given by the National Office will be charged to the student. 
This rate for the Common and Optional Examinations is $4.50. 



Page Fifty-seven 



OBSERVATION AND PRACTICE TEACHING 

In order to supplement its instruction in educational principles, aims, 
methods, curricula and procedure, and to cultivate professional skill in teach- 
ing, Spring Hill College has secured the cooperation of the Jesuit High School 
of New Orleans. Through the courtesy of its administrators and teachers, 
this school thus becomes the proving ground for the professional students of 
the Department of Education, who have free access to its classrooms for ob- 
servation of the methods practiced therein and for supervised practice teach- 
ing. Co-operating with the State Department of Education, Spring Hill Col- 
lege requires that its candidates for degrees with a major in education present 
a minimum of 4 semester hours in observation and practice teaching with a 
minimum of 40 full periods of class teaching and 15 hours of observation. 



Page Fifty-eight 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



INTRODUCTORY NOTES 

The courses of instruction listed below are numbered accord- 
ing to a unified plan. Lower division courses are numbered 1 to 
99. Within the lower division numbers, the numbers 30 to 99 gen- 
erally indicate that the course is open to sophomores. Upper divi- 
sion courses are numbered from 100 to 199. Courses given in the 
first semester are usually designated by an odd number; second 
semester courses by an even number. Double numbers, when used, 
indicate that the first semester course is prerequisite for the second 
semester course and that both must be satisfactorily completed to 
obtain credit for either course. In most departments the courses 
are grouped in decades according to sequence, content, or some 
other plan of subdivision. 



KEY SYMBOL 



The following is a list of the key letters used to indicate the 
different departments of instruction: 



Accounting Ac 

Biology Bl 

Business Administration Ba 

Chemistry Ch 

Economics ____ Ec 

Education —..Ed 

Engineering _ Eg 

English En 

French . Fr 

German Gr 

Gree\ ._ „_ G\ 

History Hs 



Latin Lt 

Mathematics Mt 

Music Mu 

Philosophy PI 

Physical Education Pe 

Physics Ph 

Political Science Po 

Psychology Ps 

Religion Rl 

Sociology So 

Spanish Sp 

Speech Ex 



Page Fifty -nine 



Of the courses listed below under the various department head- 
ings as many as may seem necessary will be given each term; the 
College, however, reserves the right to ma\e such changes or vari- 
ations as circumstances require, including restriction of the num- 
ber of students to be admitted to any course. 



BIOLOGY (Bl) 

To major in biology a student must include in his program Bl 191 and at least sixteen 
additional upper division hours in biology, as approved by the chairman of the department. 

Students who plan to major in biology should confer with the department chairman 
as soon as possible after this decision has been reached. To pursue advanced upper-division 
courses in biology it is necessary for the student to undergo successfully a qualifying ex- 
amination; this examination is administered annually and usually should be taken by the 
student during his sophomore year. The date of the examination is announced each year 
by the Department of Biology. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 
1-2. General Biology 

An elementary course consisting of a study of protoplasm and the cell, the taxonomy 
of the plant and the animal kingdoms, the morphology and physiology of plant and animal 
types, and of the principal facts of heredity and evolution. Lectures two hours per week; 
laboratory four hours per week. Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

3. Genetics 

A Survey course of the facts and theories of heredity and variation. Prerequisite: Biol- 
ogy 1 or equivalent. Lectures two hours per week. One semester. Two hours credit. 

4. Genetics Laboratory 

A practical course in methods of genetics investigation. Prerequisite: Accompanied by 
Biology 3. Two hours credit. 

5-6. Anatomy and Physiology 

A course intended primarily for nurses. It consists of lectures and demonstrations in 
gross human anatomy and physiology and of lectures and laboratory work in histology and 
embryology. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory two hours per week. Two semesters. 
Six hours credit. 

1 . General Bacteriology 

This course is designed to make the student nurse more familiar with the existence, 
characteristics and activities of micro-organisms, especially as they are related to nursing, 
with emphasis on cultural methods of studying bacteria; microscopic study of pathogenic 
bacteria and their relation to disease; history of microbiology; classification of bacteria; the 
mechanism of infection; immunity and immune substances. One semester. Three hours credit. 

8. Botany 

An elementary study of the plant kingdom. May be substituted for Biology 1. Lectures 
two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

Page Sixty 



9. Zoology 

An elementary study of the animal kingdom. May be substituted for Biology 2. Lectures 
two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

1142. Introductory Biology 

A general introduction to the science of life designed especially for those who wish 
only a cultural background in biology. The course can not be substituted for Biology 1-2 
by majors in biology or by pre-medical and pre-dental students. Lectures two hours per 
week; laboratory two hours per week. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

31. Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates 

A comparative study of type forms with special reference to analogy and homology. 
Prerequisite: Biology 1-2. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
Given every year. One semester. Four hours credit. 

32. Mammalian Anatomy 

The anatomy of the cat compared with the human. Prerequisite: Bl 31. Lectures two 
hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

121. Histology 

A study of cells, tissues and organ structure. Prerequisite: Biology 1-2, 31, 32. Lectures 
two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

122. Vertebrate Embryology 

A study of gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation and later development of 
typical vertebrate forms. Prerequisite: Biology 1-2, 31, 32. Lectures two hours per week; 
laboratory four hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

125. Special Problems in Biology 

Presentation of problems in Biology which have philosophical significance. Two lec- 
tures per week. Second semester. Two hours credit. 

150. Microscopic Technique 

A laboratory course in methods of preparing tissues for microscopic study. Prerequisite: 
Biology 1-2, 31 and 32. Time to be arranged. Two hours credit. 

161. Introduction to General Physiology 

A study of matter and energy in relation to living things; solution; diffusion and 
osmotic pressure; the physico-chemical structure of protoplasm. Prerequisites: Biology 1-2, 
31 and Chemistry 1-2, 31-32, 131-132 and Physics 1. Lectures two hours per week; labora- 
tory four hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

162. General Physiology 

The fundamental life processes of organisms from a general and comparative view- 
point. Prerequisites: Biology 161, Chemistry 141-142 and Physics 2. Lectures two hours 
per week; laboratory four hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

191. History and Philosophy of Biology 

A discussion of the historical developments and philosophical implications of biology. 
Required of all majors in biology; open to all seniors who have had a course in biology. 
Prerequisites: Biology 1-2 or equivalent and Philosophy 31, 32. Two hours per week for 
one semester. Two hours credit. 

199. Introduction to Research 

Special work for advanced students and preparation of thesis. Credits to be arranged. 

Page Sixty-one 



CHEMISTRY (Ch) 

The Department requires for a Major, besides General Chemistry 1-2 and a course in 
Qualitative Analysis, Organic Chemistry 131-132, Physical Chemistry 141 and 142, Quan- 
titative Analysis 153-154 and a more advanced course as an elective, which may be Physio- 
logical Chemistry 61-162 and 163-164, or Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 181-182, 183-184, 
or Qualitative Organic Chemistry 171 followed by Organic Preparations, 172. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. General Inorganic Chemistry 

A course dealing with the fundamental laws and theories of Chemistry together with 
the systematic study of the elements. The laboratory experiments are designed to illustrate 
the matter of the course. Obligatory for all Freshmen B.S. Lectures two hours per week; 
laboratory four hours per week. Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

3. Hospital Chemistry 

An introductory survey for nurses, including principles of general chemistry, with 
special applications to nursing practice. Laboratory in blood and urine analysis. Three hours 
credit.. 

1142. Introductory Chemistry 

A general introduction to the science of chemistry designed to give the student a back- 
ground in this science. This course cannot be substituted for Ch 1-2 to qualify for advanced 
courses in chemistry. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory two hours per week. Two 
semesters. Six hours credit. 

31. Elementary Qualitative Analysis 

This course involves the theoretical and practical study of the principles underlying 
the isolation of the metallic and acid-forming elements. Obligatory for all Pre-Medical 
students and for all those majoring in Chemistry. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory 
four hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 
131432. Organic Chemistry 

The principles of Organic Chemistry and its relation to General Chemistry are empha- 
sized. Typical organic compounds are studied. General reactions and characteristics are dis- 
cussed, and many applications to practical life are given. Obligatory for all Pre-Medical stu- 
dents and for those majoring in Chemistry. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four 
hours per week. Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

135. Special Problems in Chemistry 

Presentation of problems in chemistry which have philosophical significance. Three 
lectures per week. First semester. Three hours credit. 

141. Elementary Physical Chemistry I 

This course is intended to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles of 
chemical theory. The structure of matter, thermodynamics and electrochemistry are dis- 
cussed. Obligatory for Chemistry and Biology majors. Lectures three hours per week; 
laboratory three hours per week. Four hours credit. 

142. Elementary Physical Chemistry II 

This course includes the different methods of molecular weight determination, elec- 
trical conductance, and the determination of hydrogen-ion concentrated colorimetrically and 
electrometrically. Obligatory for Chemistry majors. Presupposes a knowledge of calculus. 
Three hours per week, one laboratory period. Four hours credit. 

Page Sixty -two 



153454. Quantitative Analysis 

A more extended discussion of the theory and practice of volumetric and gravimetric 
methods, including an introduction to electroanalysis. Lecture two hours per week; labora- 
tory six hours per week. Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

161-162. Physiological Chemistry 

An elementary course dealing with the Chemistry of the carbohydrates, fats, and pro- 
teins. The chemical basis underlying the phenomena of metabolism, enzyme absorption and 
digestion are discussed. Lecture two hours per week. Two semesters. Four hours credit. 

103-104. Physiological Chemistry Laboratory 

A laboratory course to accompany 161-162. Four hours per week. Two semesters. Four 
hours credit. 

171. Qualitative Organic Analysis 

Purification and identification of organic compounds. Special emphasis is placed upon 
the practical analysis of compounds of organic origin. Lecture one hour per week; labora- 
tory six hours. One semester. Three hours credit. 

172. Organic Preparations 

A one-semester course for seniors majoring in Chemistry. Lecture one hour; laboratory 
six hours. Three hours credit. 

181-182. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

A course for seniors majoring in Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 141 and 142. 
Three periods of lecture per week. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

183-184. Inorganic Preparations 

A course for seniors majoring in Chemistry. Two periods of laboratory per week. Two 
semesters. Four hours credit. 

199. Advanced Seminar 

For seniors majoring in Chemistry. Credit to be arranged. 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 

The Greek and Latin languages are so related as the media of a unified ancient culture 
that it seems desirable for the student who majors in classical languages to have courses in 
both. It is possible, however, for a student to major in either one separately. Arrangement 
of a joint concentration must be made with the Chairman. 

In both Greek and Latin, courses numbered lower than 10 are for students who fail 
to present at least two high school units in the language. Prerequisite for any upper division 
course are: three courses or their equivalent in high school units, and one year of lower 
division college work. 

GREEK (Gk) 

1. Elementary Gree\ 

A study of the inflection of article, nouns, adjectives, and pronouns. Conjugation of 
the berb to be, of pure nad contract verbs. Written exercises, and class criticisms. Three 
hours credit. 

2. Elementary Gree\ 

A continuation of the preceding course. A study of the principal syntactical construction 
in the case of nouns, and in the moods and tenses of verbs. Irregular and mi verbs. Readings 
from Zenophon. Three hours credit. 

Page Sixty-three 



11. Prose Composition 

Written exercises involving a review of Greek syntax, or based on assigned models. 
An attempt at rhetorical composition, as shown in selections from Saint John Chrysostom 
and Saint Basil. Three hours credit. 

12. Gree\ Historians 

Selected readings from Thucydides and Zenophon. Three hours credit. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101. Attic Orators 

The development of the Attic prose and oratory as illustrated by selections from Lysias, 
Isocrates, Demosthenes. Three hours credit. 

102. Demosthenes 

Selections from the Phillippics and Olynthiacs with attention to the essentials of Greek 
oratory; structure of speeches, idiomatic usages. Demosthenes' attitude towards his contem- 
poraries. Three hours credit. 

131. Gree\ Drama 

The reading of selected passages from Euripides' Hecuba, and Sophocles' Oedipus 
Tyrannus, together with a close examination of plot, characters, and method of Greek 
tragedy, as exemplified in the works of Euripides and Sophocles. Three hours credit. 

132. Aeschylus 

A study of selected works of the early master of Greek tragedy. Three hours credit. 

142. Homer 

Selected passages from the Iliad or the Odyssey, read in the original with a compre- 
hensive knowledge of the structure and story of the entire poem in English translation. 
Comparison with Virgil's Aeneid. Thre hours credit. 

181. History of Gree\ Literature 

A survey course, aimed at acquainting the student with Greek modes of thought and 
literary expression as the basis of culture and humanistic philosophy. The origin and de- 
velopment of the chief literary types will be traced, including epic, lyric, and dramatic 
poetry, history, oratory, and philosophy. This course is open to students majoring in any 
of the Humanities. Three hours credit. 

199. Advanced Study 

A seminar for students majoring in the Classics. Three hours credit. 



LATIN (Lt) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 
1. Elementary Latin 

A study of the fundamentals of the Latin language, including the inflection of nouns, 
adjectives and pronouns; conjugation of the regular, defective, deponent and semi-deponent 
verbs, and the periphrastic conjugations. Written exercises and class criticisms. Four hours 
credit. 

Page Sixty -four 



2. Elementary Latin 

Thorough drill in the principal syntactical construction in the case of nouns, and the 
moods and tenses of verbs. Readings of selections from four books of Caesar's Gallic War, 
supplemented by practice in simple composition. Four hours credit. 

|;5. Latin Composition 

A further study of applied syntax in the subordinate clauses, result and concessive; 
direct and indirect questions; practice in correct word order and sequence of tenses. Reading 
of Cicero's First and Third Catilinarians. Four hours credit. 

4. Latin Composition 

Completion of the study of syntactical construction, including the construction of in- 
direct discourse, of dependent clauses both in direct and indirect discourse, and conditional 
sentences. Application of the rules of prosody and verse structure, scansion of the dactyllic 
hexameter. Four hours credit. 

5. Liturgical Latin 

A course in the language of the Church's liturgy, with prose and poetry selections from 
the Bible, the Missale Romanum, the Breviarium Romanum and the devotional literature 
of the Church. Prerequisite: 2 years Latin. Three hours credit. 

11-12. Cicero 

The Letters, as shedding light not only on Cicero's character and manifold relations 
with others, but also on the troublous times in which he lived. The Essays, as applying the 
principles of popularized philosophy to subjects of deep human interest; especially his two 
charming dialogues on Old Age and Friendship. The Speeches, in particular the defense of 
Archias, as giving the student an appreciation of Cicero's views on liberal education and 
its formative influence on man. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

31. Roman Historians 

Study of the historical methods and literary style of Sallust, Tacitus and Livy. Further 
practice in writing Latin according to the historical stylists. Three hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101. Latin Lyric Poetry 

The Odes of Horace, and selected Poems of Catullus, studied as examples of the 
classical lyrics. The life of Horace and his contemporaries, his attitude to the Augustan 
| Age as reflected in his works. Roman dependence on Greek models. Horace's literary in- 
fluence. Three hours credit. 

102. Roman Satire 

A comparative study of the Latin Satirists, Horace and Juvenal, and their influence on 
modern literature. Originality of Roman Satire; tracing its growth from Lucullus through 
the Golden Age to Juvenal and Martial. Three hours credit. 

103. Roman Epic 

Principal phases of Vergil's Aeneid, with special emphasis on Hellenic tradition and 
particularly Roman aspects. Three hours credit. 

104. Roman Philosophy 

Philosophical works of Cicero, Seneca, and Lucretius studied with special attention 
given to the Roman elements in Eclecticism, Stoicism and Epicurianism. Three hours credit. 

131. Patristic Latin 

Reading from Tertullian, Cyprian, Lactantius, Minucius Felix, Jerome, Ambrose, Augus- 
tine, Boethius, Prudentius, Fortunatus, etc. Three hours credit. 

Page Sixty-jive 



173. Latin Comedy 

The origin, development and chief characteristics of the Roman stage, as exemplified 
in selected plays of Plautus and Terence. The two masters of the comic contrasted; their 
character portrayals, attitude to morality, prosody, language. Comparison with comic drama 
of Aristophanes. Three hours credit. 

181. History of Latin Literature 

A survey course aimed at acquainting the student with Roman modes of thought, and 
literatory expression as the basis of culture and humanistic philosophy. Traces the develop- 
ment of literary genres through the cycles of epic, lyric, and satiric poetry; of history, 
oratory, philosophy. Three hours credit. 



COMMERCE 

Under a program of expansion, Spring Hill College has increased its course offerings 
in various fields of commerce. This program embraces an intensive training in Accounting, 
Banking and Finance, General Business, Industrial Management, and Merchandising as 
well as a complete training in Economics for students preparing for graduate work in that 
field. Pre-law students are offered a strong business program designed to meet law school 
requirements. 

The need of a broad foundation in liberal education, as well as general survey of the 
entire business field, is not overlooked in the planned specialized courses. All commerce 
students take a prescribed program of work in the freshman and sophomore years; special- 
ization is begun in the junior year. 

As a complement to the campus instruction, the department, with the cooperation of 
Mobile business firms, conducts studies of on-the-ground business practices. These field 
trips are designed to bridge the gap between the class-room and the plant. 

The professional accounting program is planned to prepare the student for work in 
the executive and public accounting fields. It has been carefully organized to fit the re- 
quirements for practical professional work and ultimate public certification. 

The Department of Commerce maintains an active employment service for its student 
personnel. Organized confidential records are prepared for students desiring aid and are 
available for examination by prospective employers. 

ACCOUNTING (Ac) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

11-12. Elementary Principles of Accounting 

This is the basic course in accounting, stressing fundamentals, and providing practice 
in bookkeeping and accounting procedures. It is required of all commerce students. Six 
hours credit. 



31-32. Intermediate Accounting 



A study of more advanced principles of accounting theory, including the study of the 
management viewpoint of accounting. Prerequisite: Ac 11-12. Required of all commerce 
students. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES y 

101-102. Advanced Accounting Problems 

Takes up advanced phases of accounting problems, including installment sales, partner- 
ship liquidations, consolidated statements, foreign exchange and fiduciary accounting. Pre- 
requisite: Ac 31-32. Required of all accounting majors. Six hours credit. 

Page Sixty-six 



131. Cost Accounting 

This is the first course in cost accounting. It includes a study of material, labor, and 
factory burden accounting, process costs, etc. Prerequisite: Ac 31-32 and junior standing. 
Required of all accounting majors. Three hours credit. 

142. Accounting Systems-Design and Installation 

This course covers a study of the design and installation of accounting systems. A 
study of special types of accounting systems is carried out as well. Prerequisites: Ac 31-32 
and 131. Required of all accounting majors. Three hours credit. 

161-162. Income Tax Procedure 

Embraces a study of the Federal tax law. Emphasizes individual and partnership tax 
problems during the first semester and corporation, gift, estate, reorganization and payroll 
tax problems during the second semester. Prerequisites: Accounting 31-32 and junior stand- 
ing. Required of all accounting majors. Open to pre-law students as an elective. Six hours 
credit. 

171-172. Elementary and Advanced Auditing 

This course covers theory and practice of auditing. Includes practice sets and supple- 
mental readings. Prerequisites: Accounting 101-102 and 131 (may be taken concurrently). 
Required of all accounting majors. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

181. Controllers hip 

The functions, duties, and responsibilities of the chief accounting officer in a public 
or private business enterprise are studied. Problems of office organization and management 
are treated as well as integration of staff activities. Takes up the work of the internal 
auditors and the study of internal accounting procedures and control. Prerequisites: Ac 101- 
102, 131, and 142. Elective for accounting majors. Two hours credit. 

182. Advanced Cost Accounting 

Takes up more advanced topics of cost accounting and treats standard costs compre- 
hensively. Prerequisites: Ac 31-32 and 1 31. Elective for accounting majors. Two hours credit. 

183. Budgetary Accounting 

The course stresses the preparation of a complete budget for managerial control for 
an industrial concern. Consideration will be given to the budget problems of other types 
of concerns. Elective for accounting majors. Two hours credit. 

184. Governmental Accounting 

In this course the student studies the special features of accounting for municipalities 
and other governmental units as well as institutional accounting. Prerequisites: Accounting 
101-102. Elective for accounting majors. Two hours credit. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (Ba) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 
31-32. Business Law 

A general course covering contracts; agency; corporation; negotiable instruments; sales; 
bailments and carriers; unfair competition. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 
115. Corporation Finance 

A study of the problems of financial management of a business. Some of the topics 
considered are: promotion; stocks, bonds, notes, accounts; sources of fixed capital; distri- 
bution of earnings; expansion; reorganization. Three hours credit. 

Page Sixty-seven 



117. Introduction to Industrial Management 

A survey course in management principles and methods. The student is given a com- 
prehensive view of modern practices of planning, organizing, and controlling various 
functional activities in business. Three hours credit. 

124. Investments 

A study of the nature and principles of Investment with their application to the types 
of securities and an analysis of the channels of distribution. Three hours credit. 

127. Taxation 

This course is directed to a practical knowledge of the principles and methods of gov- 
ernmental fiscal operations and policies. Three hours credit. 

132 Marketing 

A presentation of the fundamental principles and methods of marketing functions with 
an analysis of consumer buying habits and motives. Three hours credit. 

133434 Retailing Problems 

A course including the intensive study of retail store management and operations. 
Buying operations, stock control and merchandise planning are also included. Open to 
merchandising seniors, others with permission of the instructor. Six hours credit. 

136. Purchasing 

The study of the principles of purchasing and types of actual problems confronting 
a purchasing agent in the performance of his duties. Three hours credit. 

138. Credit Management 

This course includes the study of the work of the credit manager in the various types 
of marketing agencies, and credit from the mercantile credit manager's viewpoint. Three 
hours credit. 

142. Wholesaling 

A study is made of the functions of the wholesaler, relations between manufacturers 
and retailers, price policies, quantity discounts, etc. Three hours credit. 

143. Advertising 

A study of the practices and policies of advertising in the main type of advertising 
media. Three hours credit. 

144. Salesmanship 

The underlying economic and psychological laws which govern selling. Three hours 
credit. 

147-148. Ban\ Administration 

This course deals with managerial problems of banks. Problems including organiza- 
tion, capital structure, earning power, supervision and regulation, examinations, call reports, 
and other regulatory matters are taken up. Open to Banking and Finance seniors, others 
with permission of the instructor. Six hours credit. 

152. Insurance 

The principles and practices underlying the more important types of insurance as fac- 
tors in private and business life. Three hours credit. 

155. Advanced Monetary Theory 

This is an introductory study of the inter-relations of money, credit and prices. Three 
hours credit. 

Page Sixty -eight 



174. Real Estate 

A course embracing a study of the economici, legal, and administrative principles of 
real property. Three hours credit. 

181. Time and Motion Study 

A course in the fundamentals of operation analysis, motion economy, time study, job 
standards and industrial efficiency. Three hours credit. 

182. Manufacturing Industries 

A survey course in the technical factors and processes, peculiar business problems and 
economic characteristics of the leading manufacturing industries of the United States. Three 
hours credit. 

183-184. Industrial Management Problems 

This course includes a study of problems involving planning, layout, operation, ad- 
ministration, wage incentive plans, industrial safety in the manufacturing plant; also in- 
cluded is a study of economic factors of production and the structure of industrial organiza- 
tion. Open to industrial management majors, others with permission of instructor. Six 
hours credit. 

186. Personnel Problems 

An analysis of the principles of selection, training, care, and administriation of per- 
sonnel, considered in the light of current attempts to solve employer-employee differences. 
Three hours credit. 



ECONOMICS (Ec) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 
31. Introduction to Economics 

A brief analysis of economic principles designed for non-economic majors. Three hours 
credit. 

35-36. Principles of Economics 

This course is intended to give a thorough explanation of the laws and principles under- 
lying the economic system. It embraces a detailed analysis of production, distribution, ex- 
change and consumption. A prerequisite for all upper division courses in economics. Six 
hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 
106. Money and Banking 

Designed to give the students a firm grasp of the economic principles and theories 
underlying money, and the functions and operation of investment, commercial, and central 
banking. Three hours credit. 

112. Land Economics 

A survey of the principles of land utilization and the major problems arising there- 
from. Three hours credit. 

122. Labor Economics 

Reviews social, economic, historical, and political factors significant to orientation in 
industrial relations; analysis of main phases of industrial conflict with proposed solutions. 
Three hours credit. 

Page Sixty -nine 



123. Labor Law 

Study of modern labor legislation which so deeply and so continuously affects the 
problems of industrial relations. Three hours credit. 

126. Economic History of the United States 

The economy of colonial America; commerce, agriculture and finance after 1789; the 
industrial revolution; the westward movement; development of banking, transportation and 
labor; rise of the corporation; growth of foreign trade; the United States as a world eco- 
nomic power. Three hours credit. 

128. Statistics 

An introductory consideration of statistical theory; collection, presentation, analysis and 
interpretation of data; frequency distribution; time series; measures of central tendency and 
dispersion; index numbers; correlation; forecasting. Three hours credit. 

134. International Trade 

This course is designated to give the student a foundation in the theories and opera- 
tion of international commercial policy and practice, foreign investment and foreign ex- 
change. Three hours credit. 

138439. Economic Analysis 

A two semester course in intermediate economics embracing studies in demand and 
supply, marginal analysis. Six hours credit. 

145. Business Cycles 

Economiic organization in its relation to the business fluctuations; indexes of business 
conditions; timing duration and amplitudes of cycles; international aspects; the problems of 
forecasting and control. Three hours credit. 

153. History of Economic Thought 

An historical analysis of the development of Economic Theory. A study of the chief 
contributions of the Physiocrats, Adam Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, Say, Mill, Cairnes, Carey, 
Bastiat, Marks, Bohm-Bawerk, J. B. Clark, Marshall, and Veblen. Three hours credit. 

155. Contemporary Economic Problems 

The economic principles involved in the existing maladjustments will be considered 
in the light of current attempts to secure a solution. Three hours credit. 

156. Contemporary Economic Thought 

A survey of contemporary economic literature considering present school of economic 
thought, their points of difference and theoretical tendencies. Three hours credit. 



EDUCATION (Ed) 

For information concerning Teacher Training the student is referred to the section of 
this Bulletin on Programs of Curricula. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 
21. Introduction to Education 

An orientation course which surveys the field of education and of teacher training. Its 
objective is to provide the prospective teacher with an understanding of the personal and 
professional qualifications, relationships and responsibilities of the teacher. Three hours credit. 

Page Seventy 



31. History of Education 

A survey of educational theory, institutions and practice during ancient and modern 
times with special emphasis on the European systems which influenced the more recent 
educational movements in Europe and America. Three hours credit. 

32. History of Education in the U. S. 

This course begins with a study of the origin and development of the various school 
systems, denominational and public, in the United States, section by section. It then takes 
up the advancement made in elementary, secondary and higher education. The treatment 
of such topics as professional education, technical and agricultural education, the prepara- 
tion of teachers, art and manual education, commercial education, educational associations, 
is included in the course. Three hours credit. 

81. Philosophy of Education 

A study of the philosophical principles underlying the different systems of education 
with a special emphasis on the Jesuit system. Three hours credit. 

82. Educational Psychology 

This course considers the nature, function and measurement of the original tendencies 
of the individual, and the modification of them which the school endeavors to bring about. 
That this purpose may be better effected, the student is directed in the study of the laws 
of learning, the learning curve, the efficiency and permanence of learning, transfer of 
training, the result of exercise, the measurement of achievement, the use of tests, the new 
type examinations. Three hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

111. Principles of High School Teaching 

This course studies the individual at the stage of his secondary education, his native 
and acquired tendencies to action, and deduces principles by which the teacher may be 
guided in his attempts to direct the interest and secure the attention of the pupil. Among 
the topics considered are: the aims in instruction, the class exercise; the essentials of good 
questioning; the modes of instruction; the importance of study; the prelection or assign- 
ment; the repetition or recitation; standards and measurements; the individual and social 
elements in secondary instruction. Three hours credit. 

112. Statistical Methods in Education 

The purpose of the course is to acquaint teachers and prospective teachers with those 
statistical techniques which are most important from the viewpoint of education; to afford 
an opportunity for a degree of mastery over the tools of research and supervision which 
the modern teacher needs for successful interpretation and use of standards and informal 
test results; and to help in meeting the prerequisites for courses in educational measure- 
ments. Three hours credit. 

135. Extra-Curricular Activities 

The purpose of this course is to instruct the students of education in the importance 
of student participation in school activities outside the classroom. Considerable time is de- 
voted to the theory and practice of the teaching of athletic sports, football, baseball basket- 
ball, track sports and boxing. The fundamental principles of various football systems, rules, 
training, special plays, are among the topics dealt with. There is explicit insistence upon 
the transfer of training in punctuality and promptitude in the execution of plays and other 
desirable qualities from the field of play to the regular work of the school and of after 
life. Daily lecture and daily two-hour period of field work. Three hours credit. 

150. Co-operative Study of Secondary Schools 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the work accomplished by the Com- 
mittee set up for the Co-operative Study of Secondary School Standards. Through the study 

Page Seventy-one 



of the manual for Evaluating a Secondary School, The Evaluative Criteria and Educational 
Temperatures, the student lays the ground work for an appreciation and critical evaluation 
of the standards that should govern secondary schools. Three hours credit. 

161. Materials and Methods of Teaching English 

The organization of a balanced curriculum in English. Integration of High School 
English with college requirements. Three hours credit. 

166. Materials and Methods of Teaching History 

The object of this course is to give the student an intimate knowledge of the aim, 
methods, and contents of the history course in the high school. Three hours credit. 

171. Materials and Methods of Teaching Science 

The course purports to evaluate the place of the natural sciences in the high school 
curriculum and study in survey the materials that make up the science courses along with 
the methods best suited to achieve the aims of the science courses. Three hours credit. 

176. Materials and Methods of Teaching Language 

A study of the contents and modern methods of presentation of the various modern 
languages as well as the classical languages. Special emphasis is laid on the more recent 
methods of teaching Spanish and French. Three hours credit. 

181. Materials and Methods of Teaching Mathematics 

Current trends and problems in the teaching of mathematics in secondary schools, 
methods of selecting and organizing teaching materials, effective teaching procedures, 
diagnostic and remedial techniques. Three hours credit. 

183. Materials and Methods of Teaching Commercial Subjects 

A study and evaluation of the contents of various Commercial Courses as found in 
different school systems; a survey of the more advanced methods in the presentation of 
commercial subjects; the place of the commercial subjects in the modern high school. Three 
hours credit. 

195-196. Observation and Practice Teaching 

One and one-half or two semester hours each session. Schedule to be arranged by 
each student individually with the head of the department of education. In order to sup- 
plement its instruction in educational principles, aims, methods, curricula and procedure, 
and to cultivate professional skill in teaching, Spring Hill College has secured the co- 
operation of the Jesuit High School of New Orleans. Through the courtesy of its admin- 
istrators and teachers, this school thus becomes the proving ground for the professional 
students of the Department of Education, who have free access to its classrooms for ob- 
servation of the methods practiced therein and for supervised practice teaching. Co-operating 
with the State Department of Education, Spring Hill College requires that its candidates 
for degrees with a major in education present a minimum of 4 semester hours in observa- 
tion and practice teaching with a minimum of 40 full periods of class teaching and 15 
hours of observation. Four hours credit. 



ENGINEERING (Eg) 

The following courses, administered by the Department of Mathematics and Physics, 
are offered primarily for students who wish to initiate their engineering training at Spring 
Hill; admission to the class is restricted. 

1. Introductory Geology 

A lecture course in the general phenomena of dynamic and structural geology, illus- 
trating the external and internal geological agencies and processes with the resulting land 
forms. Two classes per week for one semester. Two hours credit. 

Page Seventy-two 



2. Surveying 

Theory, use and adjustment of instruments; methods of computation; some practical 
field work and topographic map-making. One class and four hours of field work per week 
for one semester. Three hours credit. 

3-4. Engineering Drawing 

Lettering, geometrical construction, orthographic projection, dimensioning. Four hours 
instruction and practice per week for two semesters. Four hours credit. 

5. Descriptive Geometry 

A critical study of the science of drawing; the location of points, lines and planes; 
single-curved surfaces; surfaces of revolution; tangent lines and planes; intersection of sur- 
faces; shades and shadows; perspective. Prerequisite: Eg 3 and 4 and some \nowledge of 
solid geometry. Four hours instruction and practice per week for one semester. Three hours 
credit..... 

6. Intermediate Engineering Drawing 

Isometric and oblique drawing, intersections and development of surfaces, tracing. 
Prerequisite: Eg 3 and 4. Four hours instruction and practice per week for one semester. 
Two hours credit. 

7. Introductory Engineering Problems 

A course designed to determine the student's abilities, desires, and shortcomings in 
work of an engineering nature; to aid the student in getting a better grasp of essential ele- 
mentary mathematics; and to prepare the student for handling better a certain portion of his 
first term of physics. Lectures two hours per week for one semester. Two hours credit. 



ENGLISH (En) 

The student desiring to major in English must include in his program of studies 
En 161 or 162 or 182 and at least 15 semester hours in other upper division courses, as 
approved by the department chairman. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

FG. Fundamental Grammar and Usage 

A course in the essentials of grammar and correct usage. Required of Freshmen and 
others who may be deficient in the theory or practice of correct English. A no-credit course 
but satisfactory work on the part of those taking it is prerequisite to any other English credit. 

1-2. Freshman Composition 

An intensive study of the various forms of compositions, with frequent practice in 
writing, and the reading and analysis of models. Required of all Freshmen, unless excused 
by special permission. Six hours credit. 

31. Types of Prose 

A literary study of the chief types of prose writing, narrative and expository with 
modern examples preferred. A substitute for Freshman Composition in the case of superior 
entering students. Three hours credit. 

32. Poetry 

A course in the nature and elements of poetry, principles of versification. Reading, 
analysis and appreciation of selected poetry. Practice in verse writing. Three hours credit. 

Page Seventy-three 



33. Report Writing 

A study of the fundamentals of planning and writing special reports, particularly for 
business purposes; analysis of actual specimens for content, style and manner of presenta- 
tion. Two lectures per week. Two hours credit. 

41. The Short Story 

The rise and development of this literary form. Extensive reading of great examples 
from world literature, with particular attention to the American short story. Analysis as 
well as composition required. Three hours credit. 

45. The Drama 

The theory of the drama will be studied and illustrated through historical examples, 
chiefly from English playwrights. Developments in play production will be studied as 
well as composition. Three hours credit. 

61-62. Survey of English Literature 

A study of the historical background of the chief masterpieces of English literature 
from Beowulf to Thomas Hardy. Readings in the principal authors, and critical papers at 
weekly intervals. Required of all A.B. Sophomores. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 
132433. Shakespeare 

Shakespeare's life, influence; source of his drama; an acquaintance by reading and 
assignments with the Shakespearean literature of criticism; reading, analysis, and close study 
of six to twelve plays. Three to six hours credit. 

146. The Novel 

The principal purpose of this course is to study the technique of the novel, and the 
various schools of fiction. Reading of six selected novels, with special attention to literary 
and ethical merit. Three hours credit. 

150. Aesthetics and Literary Criticism 

The philosophical basis of aesthetics, the elements of taste; theories of criticism; a sur- 
vey of critical standards; a study of the schools of criticism, and of the work of the chief 
literary critics. Three hours credit. 

161. Newman 

A study of three of the English Cardinal's great works; The Idea of a University, 
The Present Position of Catholics in England, and Apologia pro Vita Sua; detailed analysis 
of thought, and examination of literary merits. Three hours credit. 

162. Catholic Literary Revival 

A study of the chief figures in the modern literary resurgence stemming from New- 
man, and his movement. Special emphasis on Hopkins and Chesterton. Three hours credit. 

181. Milton 

A survey course of the life and work of Milton, with special emphasis on the longer 
poems. Three hours credit. 

182. Chaucer 

A specialized study of the poet and of his works, with particular attention to the 
Canterbury Tales. Three hours credit. 

185. Romantic Poets 

A specialized study of the five great Romantic Poets; Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, 
Keats, and Shelly. Philosophy and literary theory of the period. Three hours credit. 

Page Seventy-four 



\188. Victorian Poets 

The most important movements and figures in poetry during the Victorian period, 
with detailed study of Browning and Tennyson. Three hours credit. 

191. American Literature 

A rapid survey of the chief American poets and prose writers of the Nineteenth Cen- 
tury. Three hours credit. 

195. Modern Literature 

A careful examination of the best writers in English and America who have risen to 
prominence since World War I. Three hours credit. 

199. Special Study for Advanced Students 

Two hours credit. 



HISTORY (Hs) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Early Medieval History 

Significance of the Roman Empire; conflict with Christianity; triumph of Christianity, 
Migration of Nations. The Franks, the Lombards, and the Holy See. The Byzantine Em- 
pire. The Carolingians, Church and State. Feudalism. Monasticism. Germany and the Holy 
Roman Empire. Lay-Investiture. Three hours credit. 

2. Late Medieval History 

Islam; the Crusades. The Hoenstaufens. Invasion of the Mongola. Saint Louis. Social 
and economic features of the Middle Ages. Medieval education and culture; Scholasticism. 
Development of political and constitutional institutions. The Avignon Captivity; Western 
Schism. The Hundred Years' War. The Wars of the Roses. Eastern Europe. Consolidation 
of European monarchies. Three hours credit. 

31. Renaissance and Revolution 

The Revival of Learning of Art, and Politics. Social Conditions. The Protestant Revo- 
lution in Germany, England and Scotland. Catholic Revival. The Hugenot Wars in France. 
The Revolt of the Netherlands. The Thirty Years' War. The Puritan Revolution. The Age 
of Louis XIV. The War of the Spanish Succession. The Church and the State. The making 
of Russia. The Rise of Prussia. The Downfall of Poland. The French Revolution. Napoleon 
Bonaparte. Three hours credit. 

32. Europe Since 1814 

The Industrial Revolution. England and France in the Nineteenth Century- The Uni- 
fication of Germany. The Unification of Italy. The Social, Political and Religious Conditions 
in Europe. The Eastern Question. The Partition of Africa. The World War of 1914. Re- 
construction after World War. Three hours credit. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

111. American History to the Reconstruction Period 

This course, with the following, aims to bring into relief the outstanding influences 
that have shaped the history of the United States from the Colonial Period to our own. 
Stressing this purpose topics of import for the social, economic and political development 
of the nation. Three hours credit. 

Page Seventy-five 



112. American History Since the Reconstruction Period 

A course similar to the preceding, stressing in its latest phases the conditions and cir- 
cumstances that led to America's participation in the Great Wars, with the resulting stimulus 
to a clearer national consciousness of the values and significance of American citizenship. 
Three hours credit. 

133. English History to the Tudors 

A survey of English history from 55 B. C. to 1485. The Celts; Roman Britain; the 
Anglo-Saxon invasions. Christianity and Monasticism. Pre-Conquest England. The Norman 
conquest. Medieval institutions; Feudalism; Magna Charta; evolution of Parliament. Church 
and State. The Hundred Year's War and the Black Death; social and economici aspects; 
religious movements; intellectual progress. The Lancastrian experiment. Wars of the Roses. 
Three hours credit. 

134. English History Since the Tudors 

A survey of English history from 1845 to the present. Tudor absolutism. The Protes- 
tant Revolt. Erastianism and the Church of England. The Stuarts; the Puritan Revolution; 
the Restoration; the Revolution of 1688-1689 and settlement under William and Mary. 
Hanoverian England. Agrarian and industrial revolutions. Imperialism. Victoria England. 
British Commonwealth of Nations. Recent events of constitutional, social, economic and. 
political importance. Three hours credit. 

141. History of Latin America 

European Background. Early discoveries and settlements in the islands and on the 
mainland of North, Central and South America. Civilization of the Natives. Spanish and 
Portuguese Colonial Systems. Contribution of the Jesuit and Franciscan Missionaries to 
Culture and Civilization. Abuses of the Spanish Government. The Struggles for Inde- 
pendence. History of Independent Mexico and Cenral American Countries after 1821. 
Economic, social and political life. Three hours credit. 

142. History of Latin America (Continued) 

History of the Independent Countries of South America. Economic, Social and Politi- 
cal Life. The Monroe Doctrine. Significance and influence. Relation of the Latin Ameri- 
can Countries with one another, the United States and the World. Pan-Americanism. Latin 
America and the World War. Present situation and outlook. Three hours credit. 

151-152. History of the Church 

First semester: From the beginning to the Renaissance. Second semester: From the 
Renaissance to the present day. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 



MATHEMATICS (Mt) 

To prospective majors in mathematics the department suggests the desirability of a 
college course in physics and of work in French or German sufficient to permit the read- 
ing of mathematical works in those languages. 

A minimum of eighteen hours of upper division courses is required for a major in 
mathematics. However, regardless of courses taken and grades earned in them, a student 
desiring to graduate with a major in mathematics must successfully undergo a compre- 
hensive examination covering the subject matter noted in the departmental syllabus, which 
is obtainable upon request. Students interested primarily in mathematical physics may elect 
a combined program in mathematics and physics and undergo a comprehensive examination 
based on a special syllabus. 

One course beyond calculus satisfies the minimum requirement for a minor in mathe- 
matics, subject, of course, to approval by the student's major department. 

Responsibility for the election of a program of courses in conformity with the pre- 
ceding regulations rests ultimately upon the individual student. 

Page Seventy-six 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Intermediate Algebra 

A course in algebra to establish the pre-requisites of college algebra; review of ele- 
mentary operations, factoring, fractions, linear equations, exponents, radicals, quadratic 
quations. This course is to be elected by students whose previous training is deficient and 
it will also satisfy the minimum requirements in algebra for introductory college science 
courses. Three classes per week for one semester. Three hours credit. 

2. Trigonometry 

Definition and fundamental relations between trigonometric functions, solutions of 
triangles, applications, trigonometric identities and trigonometric equations. Three classes 
per week for one semester. Three hours credit. 

The preceding courses satisfy the absolute minimum graduation requirements in mathe- 
matics, except for prospective majors in chemistry, mathematics and physics. They may not, 
however, be applied toward satisfying the requirements for a major or minor in mathematics. 

Unrestricted admission to the following courses, Mt 3 and Mt 4, is not permitted to 
freshmen; registration is contingent on the results of a qualifying examination administered 
to entering students. Successful completion of these courses, or their equivalent, is pre- 
requisite to further work in mathematics. In this connection the student is reminded 
that registration for Ph 51, Mechanics and Heat, presupposes at least simultaneous registra- 
tion in Mt 101, Calculus 1. 

3. College Algebra 

A study of the number systems of elementary mathematics, polynomials and allied 
functions, algebraic identities, equations and systems of equations. Four classes per week 
for one semester. Four hours credit. 

4. Plane Analytic Geometry 

Introduction to vectors, determinants and matrices applied to the straight line, circle, 
conies and their properties; a study of the general equation of the second degree in two 
variables. Four classes per week for one semester. Four hours credit. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

The following upper division courses are designed to prepare the student for the com- 
prehensive examination in mathematics. Registration in courses beyond calculus (Mt 101- 
102) is restricted and is contingent on the results of a qualifying examination to be ad- 
ministered usually at the end of the semester in which the student completes Calculus II. 
It is the student's responsibility to register his intention to present himself for this exami- 
nation; the registration will be announced each semester and is made with the department 
chairman. 

100. Special Problems in Mathematics 

Presentation of problems in mathematics which have philosophical significance. Two 
lectures per week. Two hours credit. 

101. Calculus I 

Numbers, variables and functions; differentiable functions; the derivative; the differen- 
tial; the calculation of derivatives; maxima and minima; the theorem of the mean; inverse 
functions; the concept of arc length; the trigonometric functions; physical applications of 
the derivative; curve tracing. Four classes per week for one semester. Four hours credit. 

102. Calculus II 

Integration; the logarithmic and exponential functions; anti-differentiation; applications 
of the definite integral; special plane curves; introduction to infinite series and integrals. 
Four classes per week for one semester. Four hours credit. 

Page Seventy-seven 



131. Solid Analytic Geometry 

Points and vectors in space; matrices and determinants; study of the sphere and second- 
degree surfaces; the general equation of the second degree in three variables. Three classes 
per week for one semester. Three hours credit. 

151. Differential Equations 

Treatment of ordinary differential equations including principal types of first and 
second order equations, simultaneous equations, and linear equations with constant co- 
efficients, applications, special methods for solutions. Introduction to partial differential 
equations. Three classes per week for one semester. Three hours credit. 

152. Infinite Series and Definite Integrals 

The real number system, limits; the derivative and integrals of functions of one vari- 
able; series and uniform convergence; discussion of special functions. Three classes per 
week for one semester. Three hours credit. 

153. Introduction to Algebraic Theories 

Polynomials, rectangular matrices and elementary transformations, equivalence of 
matrices and of forms, linear spaces, polynomials with matric coefficients, fundamentals 
algebraic structures. Three classes per week for one semester. Three hours credit. 

154. Projective Geometry 

Elementary projective geometry treated both algebraically and synthetically with rela- 
tions to the theory of groups and of linear transformations indicated. Three classes per 
week for one semester. Three hours credit. 

155. Introduction to Partial Differential Equations 

Partial differentiation and space geometry; origins of partial differential equations; 
linear and non-linear equations of the first order; Fourier series; linear equations of higher 
order. Three classes per week for one semester. Three hours credit. 

199. Mathematics Seminar 

Study of special problems determined by interest and previous training of senior stu- 
dents. Two hours credit. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



The courses of the Department are in the French, German, and Spanish languages. 
The nature of the courses and their content are such as to secure the following sequence 
of objectives; a) A reading knowledge sufficient to fulfill the lower division objective in 
the field of modern language; b) A mastery of grammar and syntax, and an acquaintance 
with the elements of style as an immediate preparation for the study of literature. This 
objective will also include an ability to converse with correct pronunciation and natural 
inflexion; c) A knowledge and appreciation of the literature of the language; d) An ac- 
quaintance with the history and culture of the people from which the language comes. 

Because a reading knowledge of at least one modern language is a prescribed ob- 
jective of the lower division, a reading test will be given freshmen students, who enter 
with two or more high school units in modern language, to determine whether or not 
their previous preparation will satisfy the requirement. Freshman students will be re- 
quired to take two semesters of reading courses. 

Two years of lower division work or the equivalent will be required as a prerequisite 
to upper division courses. Majors and other students who take upper division courses in 
the Department of Modern Languages will be advised in the selection of courses by the 
Chairman. 

Page Seventy-eight 



FRENCH (Fr) 

■LOWER DIVISION COURSES 
[17. Elementary French 

The Article, the Noun, the Adjective, the Numerals, Pronouns, Conjugation of regular 
'.verbs and of the more common irregular verbs. Frequent themes. First semester. Three 
mhours credit. 



2. Elementary French 

Irregular verbs. Use of Moods and Tenses. Government of Verbs. Order of words in 
the sentence. Frequent themes. Second semester. Three hours credit. 

31-32. Intermediate French 

Review of Syntax. Prose Composition. Reading of graduated texts: Daudet, de Mau- 
passant, Coppec, Bourget. Six hours credit. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

777. Survey of French Literature I 

An anthology study of chief literary masterpieces in chronological order, up to and 
including the seventeenth century. Three hours credit. 

112. Survey of French Literature II 

A continuation of the preceding course, bringing the story down through the nine- 
teenth century. Three hours credit. 

131-132. The French Novel 

A detailed study of different types of the French novel; Classical, Romantic, Realistic 
and Contemporary, with reference to theme, characters, treatment, and style. Three to six 
hours credit. 

141. The French Drama 

A study of the technique of the French drama. Special stress will be laid on the clas- 
sical tragedy, Racine and Corneille. Three hours credit. 

142. The French Comedy 

A reading course with special attention to the works of Moliere. Three hours credit. 

153. Lyric Poets of the Nineteenth Century 

A specialized study of the romantic movement as illustrated in the poetry of Hugo, 
Musset, Vigny and Lamartine. Three hours credit. 

181. The Catholic Renaissance 

Study of the growing influence of Catholic religious thought in the prose and poetry 
of modern France, up to and including Claudel and Maritain. Three hours credit. 

199. Seminar for Advanced Students 

Special readings for advanced training. Three hours credit. 

Page Seventy-nine 



GERMAN (Gr) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Reading Course 

A systematically progressive course designed to give the student facility in reading 
simple German. Elements in phonetic and grammar. Three hours credit. 

2. Reading Course 

A continuation of Gr 1. Three hours credit. 

31. Intermediate Reading Course 

This study is based on comprehensive readings of modern prose with special emphasis 
on vocabulary building, idioms, and grammar review. Three hours credit. 

32. Intermediate Reading Course 

A continuation of Gr 31. Three hours credit. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

111. Advanced German 

Advanced composition. Survey of the history of German literature. Three hours credit. 

112. Advanced German 

Continuation of Gr 111. Three hours credit. 

124. Scientific German 

Course designed to give facility in reading science periodicals in German. Three hours 
credit. 

131-132. German Drama 

Technique of the drama in German, with special study of Goethe and Schiller. Two 
semesters. Six hours credit. 

141442. The German Novel 

A reading course in the modern novel. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 



SPANISH (Sp) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Elementary Spanish 

Phonetics; pronunciation, accentuation, punctuation, capitalization. Rules governing 
nouns, adjectives and pronouns. Regular Verbs, Auxiliary Verbs: ser, estar, haber. Reading 
and drill in easy conversation. Three hours credit. 

2. Elementary Spanish 

A continuation of the preceding course. Study of irregular verbs, reflexive verbs, ortho- 
graphic changing verbs. The subjunctive in independent and subordinate clauses. Reading 
and translation of easy stories. Three hours credit. 

Page Eighty 



31. Intermediate Spanish 

An introduction to Spanish Prose, Reading, with a review of basic rules of grammar. 
Vocabulary building, Spanish word order, idiomatic expressions, reading aids, key words. 
Prerequisite: Sp 1 and 2, or equivalent in high school courses, proved by entrance exami- 
nation. Three hours credit. 

32. Intermediate Spanish 

A continuation of the preceding course. Three hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

111. Spanish History 

The fascinating story of a country that has colonized half of the Western World, and 
at one time or another has held dominion over more than half of the present territory of 
the United States. An introduction to Spanish literature and civilization. Three hours credit. 

112. Don Quijote 

The life and works of Cervantes, with special stress on Don Quijote, the supreme 
masterpiece of Spanish literature. A study of the content of the story, character portrayal, 
humor, style. Three hours credit. 

131. The Golden Age 

The period of literature covering the last part of the Fifteenth Century, and extend- 
ing to the end of the Seventeenth Century, the period in which Spanish culure attains its 
highest development. Three hours credit. 

132. Advanced Composition 

Study of Spanish models with a view to composition in imitation. Reading magazines 
and newspapers. Three hours credit. 



MUSIC (Mu) 

Courses in music are administered by the Department of English. 

The objectives of the music program are (a) to provide the instruction necessary for 
understanding and appreciating music as a fine art; (b) to present music as a means of 
broadening and enriching cultural life; (c) to stimulate interest in the sacred music of the 
Catholic Church and to disseminate fuller knowledge and appreciation of it; (d) to provide 
opportunities for participation in various musical organizations. 

The College offers no major in music nor the extensive training necessary for full 
professional musicianship. However, courses are offered in theoretical and applied music, 
both instrumental and vocal, as electives towards an academic degree. Students may select 
music as a minor with the approval of the Dean. For a minor eighteen hours are required, 
at least eight of which must be in Theory. In Applied Music a minimum of six hours credit 
must be gained from courses taught by private lessons in instrument or voice. A maximum 
of four hours credit will be given for satisfactory ensemble work in Applied Music, pro- 
vided the student is registered at the same time in a course in Theory. Approval by the 
instructor is required for admission into any course in music. Choir members must be 
registered in the course in Liturgical Music to gain credit for their ensemble work. Private 
lessons are taught either for one hour or two half hour periods a week. Beginners may 
take private lessons, but not for credit. Instruments other than piano and organ must be 
furnished by the student. 

I THEORY 

1. Elementary Harmony 

An integrated study of the harmonic basis of music. Emphasis on analytical harmony 
from perspective of hearing and understanding rather than of composing. Two hours credit. 

Page Eighty-one 



3-4. Appreciation of Music 

A study of the elements necessary for intellectual enjoyment and appreciation of music. 
Principles of melody, rhythm, harmony, and tone color. Study of structure and forms. 
Symphonies, operas, and concertos analyzed and explained. Recordings played in the Music 
room two hours a week. One hour of lecture. Four hours credit. 

5. History of Music 

A survey of the development of music from ancient to modern times with special 
emphasis on the classical and romantic schools. Two hours credit. 

6. Gregorian Chant 

The theory of Gregorian Chant or Plainsong. Neums, modes, chironomy. Syllabic and 
melismatic chants. Psalmody. Recordings studied. Practical vocal study of important chants. 
Two hours credit. 

151-152. Liturgical Music 

The traditions and ideals of the sacred music of the Catholic Church. The aesthetics 
of sacred music as presented in the Motu Proprio of Piux X and in other ecclesiastical legis- 
lation. Evaluation of Gregorian, polyphonic, and modern music. Study of the recording by 
the Solesmes monks and the Sistine choir. Required of all choral students to gain credit 
in choir section of ensemble music. Four hours credit. 



II APPLIED MUSIC 
A. Private Lessons 

77-72. Intermediate Piano 

Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 

111-112. Advanced Piano 

Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 

15-16. Voice 

Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 

115-116. Advanced Vocal Studies 

Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 

21-22. Organ Studies 

Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 



25-26. String or Wind Instrument 

Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 



B. Ensemble 

17-18. Glee Club 

Group work. One hour credit. 

19-20. Choir 

Group work Two hours credit. 

27-28. Band 

Group work. One hour credit. 

29-30. Orchestra 

Group work. One hour credit. 

Page Eighty-two 



PHILOSOPHY (PI) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

I. Introduction to Scholasticism 

The sources of the Scholastic system. Relation of philosophy to science and to faith. 
Principal tenets of scholasticism. First semester. Two hours credit. 

II. Dialectics 

The laws of thought; idea and the term; judgment and the proposition; reasoning 
and the syllogism. Fallacies. Methodology. Three hours credit. 

30. Epistcmology 

A specialized study of the truth of thought, skepticism, methodic doubt; the criteria 
of certitude, and the problem of error. Four hours credit. 

31. Logic and Critics 

A rapid survey of dialectics, with exercises in reasoning, followed by a study of the 
truth of thought, the sources of cognition, and the criteria of certitude. Three hours credit. 

32. General Metaphysics 

A rapid survey of the chief theses in Ontology and Cosmology, particularly as they 
affect the philosophy of science. Three hours credit. 

33-34. Cosmology 

A specialized study of the properties of bodies: extension, inertia, activity; the laws 
of nature, possibility of miracles; the ultimate constitution of bodies. Metaphysical nature 
and properties of quality, motion, time and space. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

35-36. Ontology 

A specialized study of being, its primary determinations and transcendental attributes; 
the various concepts of substance and accident. Individuality and personality; relaxation and 
cause. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100. Sense Psychology 

A study of sense perception, imagination, memory; the sensuous appetite, movement, 
and feeling. Four hours credit. 

101. Rational Psychology 

The study of phenomena of rational life, intellectual concepts, rational appetency, free 
will, and determination. Origin, nature and destiny of the human soul. Four hours credit. 

131. Psychology 

The human intellect and its proper object; its spirituality proved by its acts; origin 
of ideas; innate ideas. Empiricism and Ontologism rejected. The human will and its for- 
mal object; its freedom, its control of the other faculties. Nature of the human soul; a 
substantial principle, simple, spiritual, immortal, its union with the body; its origin. The 
unity and antiquity of the human race. Four lectures per week. Three hours credit. 

142. Special Metaphysics (Theodicy) 

The existence of God; metaphysical, physical and moral proofs. The nature and attri- 
butes of God; His self -existence, infinity, unity, immutability, eternity and immensity. Divine 
Providence. Three hours credit. 

Page Eighty-three 



161. History of Ancient Philosophy 

Oriental Philosophy; the Greeks; Socrates, Plato, Aristotle. The Gnostics and Nco- 
platonists. The early Fathers of the Church. Medieval Philosophy. The rival schools and 
tendencies among the Scholastics. The Thomistic synthesis. Two hours credit. 

162. History of Modern Philosophy 

Descartes and his followers; Malabranche, Locke, Hume, Voltaire and the Encyclo- 
paedists, Leibnitz Sensists and the Scottish School. The Transcendentalists: Kant, Fichte, 
Schelling and their school of thought. The Neo-Kantians. Neo-Scholasticism and the present 
outlook. Two hours credit. 

180. Ethics for Nurses 

General principles of ethics; duties to self and to fellow man; family obligations; pro- 
fessional obligations; obligations to civil authority; religion and morality; points in the 
history of medical ethics. Lectures three hours per week for one semester. Three hours credit. 

181. General Ethics 

The ultimate end of man. The existence of objective morality. Constituents of the 
moral order. Eternal and natural law. Nature of obligation. Three hours credit. 

182. Special Ethics 

Particular rights and duties. Duty of natural religion; of self-preservation; of veracity. 
The right of self-defense; of property. The social relations of man. Conjugal society. Civil 
society. State and Education. International law. Three hours credit. 

199. Seminar for Advanced Students 

Two or jour hours credit. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Pe) 



Ample opportunity is offered the student for physical exercise in many forms of com- 
petitive sport. Intramural leagues are organized in football, basketball, and baseball. Boxing 
matches are staged. Swimming in the college lake, golf on the college course, and tennis 
on the Mobile Hall courts are all the year sports. 

To stimulate students not naturally prone to systematic exercise, and to create in them 
a useful interest in some form of recreational activity, all Freshmen and Sophomores are 
required to register in one or other of the courses here listed. The courses listed below 
are administered through the Department of Education. 

1-2. Freshman Physical Education 

Freshmen must choose one of the following sections: Section A: Major Sports. Com- 
petition for the Freshman team in current sport. Section B: Minor Sports. Two hours per 
week of Tennis, Golf, Indoor Baseball, Swimming. Section C: Remedial Exercise. Light 
activities for those unable to follow more violent sports. One hour credit. 

3. Theory and Practice of Physical Education 

This course includes athletic coaching in intramural and inter-scholastic athletics. Two 
hours credit. 

4. Health and Safety Education 

A course dealing with the teaching of health and safety; it includes the teaching of 
fundamental techniques. Three hours credit. 

Page Eighty-four 



5. First Aid 

A course in the teaching of safety and techniques useful in emergency situations. One 
hour credit. 

11. Principles, Organization and Administration of Physical 
Education 

This course includes discussion of objectives and basic principals of physical education, 
and also deals with direction of intramural activities. Two hours credit. 

31-32. Sophomore Physical Education 

Sophomores must choose one of the following sections: Section A: Major Sports, Com- 
petition for the Varsity Team in current sport; Section B: Swimming (three hours per 
week); Section C: Indoor Baseball or Tennis (two hours per week.) One hour credit. 

42. Theory and Practice of Physical Education 

This course includes direction of activities other than athletics, such as games of low 
organization, stunts, elementary school activities, etc. Two hours credit. 



PHYSICS (Ph) 

The department believes that every student planning to take courses in physics on an 
upper division level should have an adequate elementary knowledge of the fundamental 
aspects of classical physics. The lower division courses 51-54 are designed to aid the student 
in acquiring this basic knowledge, but the student should be aware that no course can 
supply for deficiency in application. 

The primary educational function of upper division courses in physics is to aid the 
better student in increasing his basic knowledge of physics by providing opportunities for 
advancing study in theoretical and experimental physics. Therefore, in order to secure this 
end more effectively, unrestricted registration in upper division courses is not permitted, 
and admission to these courses is contingent on the results of a qualifying examination on 
the fundamental aspects of classical physics and on introductory mathematics through cal- 
culus; this examination will usually be administered at the end of the semester in which 
the student completes his lower division work in physics. Responsibility for seeing that this 
examination is ta\en rests directly on the individual student. 

It is desirable that students doing their upper division work in physics should have 
studied general chemistry, although this is not absolutely essential. Further all students who 
consider the possibility of more advanced work in physics are strongly advised to work 
toward acquiring, at their earliest possible opportunity, a facility in reading German, which 
is indispensable in many fields of science. A reading knowledge of French is also desirable, 
but can be secured more readily when needed. 

To satisfy the minimum requirement for a major in physics the student must elect a 
program of at least eighteen hours of upper division physics. However, regardless of courses 
taken and grades earned in them, a student desiring to graduate with a major in physics 
must successfully undergo a comprehensive examination covering the subject matter noted 
in the departmental syllabus, which is obtainable upon request. While the department will 
make every effort to assist the student, ultimate responsibility for the election of a program 
giving adequate preparation for passing the comprehensive examination rests directly on the 
individual student. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 
1-2. General Physics 

An introduction to the essential features of the classical concepts in mechanics, heat, 
sound, light, electricity and magnetism. Prerequisite: Mt 1 and Mt 2 (concurrent registra- 
tion not permitted). Three periods for lecture, demonstration and recitation and one lab- 
oratory period per week for two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

Page Eighty-five 



51. Mechanics and Heat 

The topics of Ph 1 will be treated in a more advanced and thorough manner; this 
course is for students preparing for a science major and for engineering students. Free use 
will be made of elementary calculus. Prerequisite: Mt 1, 2, 3, 4 or their equivalent and 
concurrent registration in Mt 101. Four periods for lecture and recitation per week for one 
semester. Four hours credit. 

52. Electricity, Light and Sound 

The topics of Ph 2 will be treated in a more advanced and thorough manner; this 
course is for students preparing for a science major and for engineering students. Free use 
of calculus will be made where desirable. Prerequisite: Ph 51 and concurrent registration 
in Mt 102. Four periods for lecture and recitation per week for one semester. Four hours 
credit. 

53-54. Physical Measurements 

Selected experiments to accompany the lectures of Ph 51 and 52. Two laboratory 
periods per week for two semesters. Credit for this course will be granted only when 
tahen parallel with or following successful completion of Ph 51 and 52. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

A general prerequisite for all upper division courses in addition to the qualifying ex- 
amination noted above will be a course in differential equations (concurrent registration 
will be permitted) . 

100. Special Problems in Physics 

Presentation of problems in physics which have philosophical significance. Three lec- 
tures per week. Three hours credit. 

101. Intermediate Heat 

This course deals on an intermediate level with topics such as thermal expansion, 
specific heats, change of state and van der Waal's equation, elementary kinetic theory and 
introductory thermodynamics. Two lectures per week for one semester. Two hours credit. 

102. Intermediate Light 

The following topics are treated on an intermediate level: theory of interference, dif- 
fraction, polarization principles of optics and elementary wave theory. Two lectures per 
week for one semester. Two hours credit. 

103404. Intermediate Electricity LII 

Introduction to the fundamental laws concerning the electric and magnetic properties 
of matter, electrostatics, discussion of electromagnetic waves, steady and alternating currents, 
thermoelectric and related effects. Two lectures per week for two semesters. Four hours 
credit. 

105406. Experimental Physics LI I 

An advanced student laboratory giving an introduction to experimental research tech- 
nique; assigned laboratory exercises including setting up and carrying through experiments 
concerned with fundamental principles of the lecture courses it accompanies. Hours to be 
arranged. Credits to be arranged. 

107. Intermediate Sound 

An introductory treatment, on an intermediate level, of some of the following topics: 
dynamics of vibrating bodies; transmission of sound; acoustical phenomena; supersonics. 
Two lectures per week for one semester. Two hours credit. 

Page Eighty-six 



108409. Introduction to Modern Physics I-II 

An introduction to the fundamental theories of modern physics: electrical oscillations 
and electromagnetic waves; electromagnetic and X-ray spectra; atomic and nuclear struc- 
ture. Two lectures per week for two semesters. Four hours credit. 

111-112. Theoretical Physics I-II 

The linear motion of a particle, the linear oscillator, motion in two and three dimen- 
sions, Lagrange's and Hamilton's equations, the motion of rigid bodies, the vibrating strong, 
the vibrating membrance, stresses, strains and vibrations of an elastic solid. Three lectures 
per week for two semesters. Open only to seniors and required of physics majors. Six 
hours credit. 

115. Experimental Physics 111 

An advanced student laboratory for senior students majoring in physics; opportunity 
offered for independent work in experimental physics. Credit to he arranged. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE (Po) 

The courses listed below are administered through the Department of History and 
Social Sciences. 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. American Government 

American National Government. The historical background of the Federal Constitution 
and of political issues in the United States, and the organization and functions of the 
National Government. The President, The Cabinet, The Senate, The House of Representa- 
tives, The Supreme Court and the Subordinate Federal Courts. Local and State Govern- 
ment in the United States. The State Legislature. The State Courts. Organization and 
functions of administration in counties and cities. Three hours credit. 

2. Comparative Government 

A comparative study of the governmental organizations and administrations of the 
principal European nations. Three hours credit. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 
121. Party Politics 

The development of political parties in the United States. Importance of the extra- 
constitutional element in American Government. Party platforms. Presidential campaigns 
and elections. The nominating machinery; the Presidential primary and the nominating 
convention. Party patronage. The spoils system and civil service reform. State parties and 
practical politics in local government. Three hours credit. 

132. Constitutional Law 

Fundamental principles of the United States Constitution viewed in the light of their 
history, development and application. The making of the Constitution. The Constitution 
regarded as a grant of power. Federal powers and State powers. The principle of checks 
and balances. The doctrine of Judicial Supremacy. Constitutional Limitations on Legisla- 
tive Power, Limits of the Police Power of the States. Guarantees of the Fourteenth Amend- 
ment and the Negro problem. State Constitutions. Three hours credit. 

Page Eighty-seven 



PSYCHOLOGY (Ps) 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 
131. General Psychology 

The normal functioning of the mind. Proper object of the intellect. Origin of ideas. 
Nature and relationship of the various faculties of the soul. Three hours credit. 

134. Experimental Psychology 

The methods and typical results in the experimental psychology of sensation, percep- 
tion, emotion, memory, imagination, habit, thought, volition, the relation of conscious- 
ness to its object. Four hours credit. 

142. Abnormal Psychology 

Relaxation of the abnormal to normal in psychology. Present-day conception of mental 
disorders. The chief types. Remote causes; inherited emotional instability, environment. 
Proximate or precipitating causes. Detailed study of examples of major classifications. Treat- 
ment. Three hours credit. 



RELIGION (Rl) 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 
1-2. Christian Apologetics 

Revelation and the Church of Christ. The study of Christianity as a revealed religion. 
Divine institution of the Church. Marks of the Church. Its end and constitution. Required 
of all Catholic Freshmen. Two semesters. Two hours credit. 

31. Moral Guidance 

The Catholic Theory of Morality. The Fundamental obligations of the Christian. De- 
tailed study of the first three commandments with application to practical cases. One 
semester. Required of all Catholic Sophomores. One hour credit. 

32. The Commandments 

A detailed study of the last seven commandments and the precepts of the Church. A 
special consideration of the duties and obligations peculiar to the various professions. One 
semester. Required of Catholic Sophomores. One hour credit. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 
131-132. Catholic Dogma 

The nature of God; Creation and elevation of Man; Original sin; the Incarnation; the 
Redemption. Special emphasis is given to the Scriptural texts that illustrate these truths. 
Two semesters. Required of all Catholic Juniors. Two hours credit. 

141. The Sacraments 

An advanced study of the meaning and value of the Catholic Sacramental System. A 
detailed study of the first six Sacraments and their place in the Catholic laymen's spiritual 
life. One semester. Required of all Catholic Seniors. One hour credit. 

Page Eighty-eight 



142. Christian Marriage 

Catholic doctrine on the morality of sex. The Sacrament of Matrimony. Premarital 
chastity. Prenuptial requirements. Rights, duties and graces of married couples. One semester. 
Required of all Catholic Seniors. One hour credit. 

150. Christian Life and Worship 

An advanced study of the Catholic liturgy. The Grace-life at work in true Christian 
worship. One semester. One credit hour. 



Special Courses For Non-Catholics 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 
13-14. Comparative Religion 

Definition and division of religions. A general history of the world's great religions 
with stress on the common factors and characteristic differences. Required of non-Catholic 
Freshmen and Sophomores. Given odd years. Two hours credit. 

33-34. Biblical Criticism 

The notion of inspiration. Application to the Books of the New Testament. Method 
and spirit of higher criticism. Historical value of the New Testament. Difficulties answered. 
Required of non-Catholic Freshmen and Sophomores. Given even years. Two hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 
137-138. Analysis of Faith 

Faith, its nature and form. The act of faith. Relations of reason and revelation. Faith 
and Science. Required of non-Catholic Juniors and Seniors. Given odd years. Two hours 
credit. 

143-144. Christian Morals 

The obligation of morality. Bases in reason and aids from faith. Practical applications. 
Required of non-Catholic Juniors and Seniors. Given even years. Two hours credit. 



SOCIOLOGY (So) 

The courses listed below are administered through the Department of History and 
Social Sciences. 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 
1. Introductory Sociology 

Nature, scope and value of sociology; postulates of sociology; human society and the 
machinery of social adjustment; human heredity and environment in their bearing on 
social problems; the family, aims and functions; data and conclusions of modern ethnology 
on primitive and marital relationships; ethnological discoveries and religious origins; the 
state, origin, aims, functions and authority; Socialism, revolutionary and evolutionary. Three 
hours credit. 

Page Eighty-nine 



2. Social Problems and Agencies 

A study of some of the more important social problems; working conditions and wages, 
labor organizations, unemployment, dependency and relief, the physically and mentally 
handicapped, marriage and race problems, and the problems of rural society. The student 
is introduced to some of the existing agencies for the amelioration of these problems, and 
suggestions for their more adequate solution, in conformity with sound sociological prin- 
ciples, are discussed. Three hours credit. 

21. Introduction to Public Health 

A survey course on the development of the science of public health, including the 
principles of sanitation and communicable disease control, public health organization and 
administration; the relation of personal hygiene to public health. Primarily a course for 
nurses. Three hours credit. 

31-32. Economic Relations 

Private ownership: rights and duties. False theories of property right. Present distribu- 
tion and control of wealth. Distributive ownership of the means of production. Government 
ownership. Co-operatives; consumers; producers; credit. Government supervision of industry, 
commerce and finance in the interests of the common good. Capitalism as a vicious system; 
irresponsible ownership, free competition, economic domination, economic nationalism and 
imperialism, financial internationalism. The problems of wages; the individual and family 
living wage, minimum wage laws. Modification of the wage system: labor participation in 
management, profit-sharing and labor stockholding. Strikes, industrial arbitration. Labor 
Unions of different kinds. International labor legislation (Alternative to this course: Eco- 
nomics 35-36). Six hours credit. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 
115. Culture History 

A study of the beginning and development of culture, especially among extant primi- 
tive people. Two hours credit. 

121. Social Case Wor\ 

The philosophy, methods and processes of social case work; observation and under- 
standing of family and individual needs; agencies created to meet them. The ethical aspects 
of case work. Three hours credit. 

131. Social History: Social Origins 

Early groupings among primitive people. Domestic society. Position of woman and 
the child. Sibs and the tribal relationships. Notion of Property. Slavery. Primitive morality 
and religion. Three hours credit. 

132. Social History: History of Social Work, 

Historical antecedents of present-day social work. Greek and Roman practice; Hebrew 
social legislation; Christian concept of charity. Medieval charities under ecclesiastical, com- 
munal, or guild direction. The post-Reformation poor-laws. Rise of professional social work. 
Social work of religious orders. Three hours credit. 

141. Socialism and Revolutionary Communism 

Historical and literary antecedents of Karl Marx's Das Kapital. Nature and tenets of 
Marxian Socialism; critique of the same. Historical sketch of Bolshevism. Soviet govern- 
mental system: internal policy. Communist international propaganda and activities. Defen- 
sive measures. Three hours credit. 

142. Social Ethics 

Identical with Pi 182, Special Ethics. Three hours credit. 
Page Ninety 



143. Christian Social Order 

A study of the ideal social order as delineated in the Papal Encyclicals, Rerum Novarum 
md Quadragesimo Anno. Rejection of the opposite extremes of Communism and Capitalism. 
Dne semester. Three hours credit. 

151. The Family 

Conjugal society, natural; monogamy, polygamy, polyandry. Matriarchal and patri- 
archal families. The evolutionist theory of marriage. Divorce: prevalance, causes, conse- 
quences, remedies. Birth-control and feticide. Social and economic emancipation of woman. 
The Eugenic Movement. Family disintegration; forces hostile to the family. Economic 
security; family living wage and allowances; mother's pensions. Rights and duties of parents 
n education; sex-education and training to chastity. Parent-teacher cooperation. Industrial- 
ism and the home; woman in industry. Equal rights amendment; Child Labor Amendment. 
The State and Marriage. Three hours credit. 

152. The State and International Relations 

Origin of civil society and authority. Theories of Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau; the early 
American theory of the State. The protective and promotive functions of the State. Relation 
of the State to the individual and the family. The Liberal, Socialist and Fascist State; the 
Corporative State. State assistance and compulsory social insurance. Necessity of social legis- 
lation and of government regulation of economic activity. Representative government and 
political parties. Plural vote and proportional representation. Principles of just taxation; 
inheritance taxes, income taxes, corporation taxes. The State and morals. The natural society 
of nations; international law, Patriotism, Nationalism, Internationalism. Pacifism, true and 
false. Causes of war; conditions of a just war. Measures to insure peace. Three hours credit. 



SPEECH (Ex) 

The courses in speech are administered by the Department of English. No speech 
course, however, will be accepted in the Department of English as a substitute for any 
English course. A minor in speech is permitted. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 
7-2. Basic Principles of Speech 

A study of the basic principles of speech; platform manner; voice control; qualities 
of a good speech; factors of attention; ends of speech; wording the speech; delivery. Four 
hours credit. 

3. Types of Speech 

The speech to entertain; to inform; to impress; to convince; to stimulate; to persuade; 
to actuate. Three hours credit. 

4. Occasional Address 

After-dinner speaking; speeches of courtesy; speeches of acceptance; delivery of reports; 
presenting ideas. Three hours credit. 

5. Classroom Speech 

This course is intended for those training to become teachers. A study of the teacher's 
speech problem; the vocal mechanism; a study of language; speech pathology; the art of 
speaking. Three hours credit. 

Page Ninety-one 



6. Business Speech 

A course planned for students in the department of commerce, with emphasis on the 
short business report. Three hours credit. J 

10. Parliamentary Law 

Study and application of "Robert's Rules of Order." Two hours credit. 

31. Debating and Argumentation 

The principles of debating; propositions; briefing; logical reasoning; fallacies; refutation. 
Two hours credit. 

32. Principles of Discussion 

Principles of group discussion; panels; forums; formal and informal discussion. Three 
hours credit. 

33. Extemporaneous Speaking 

The art of extemporaneous speaking; essentials of speaking without preparation. Three 
hours credit. 

34. Radio Speaking 

The occasional radio address; emphasis on the difference between speaking before a 
visible audience and a mike. Three hours credit. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101. Advanced Debating and Discussion 

Emphasis on actual debating and discussion. Study of the world's great debates and 
discussions. Three hours credit. 

103. Advanced Radio Speaking 

Newscasts; spot-commercials; live-talent shows; transcribed and recorded programs; 
special events. Three hours credit. 

105. Dramatic Readings 

Oral interpretation of the printed word; short plays; readings. Three hours credit. 



Page Ninety-two 



DEGREES CONFERRED 

VND 

JTUDENT REGISTER 







DEGREES CONFERRED 



May 25, 1948 

Bachelor of Arts 

Ifames Pascal Balthrop Robert B. Rimes, S.J. 

| Thomas Hanley Clancy, S.J. Louis Clarence Roberts 
George Frederic Cooley, S.J. cum laude 

iRobert Edward Nilon, S.J. Antonio Enrique Villaverde, S.J. 

ifohn Thomas Rickert William Henry Walsh, S.J. 
cum laude 

Bachelor of Science 

[Thomas Adams James Louis Jumonville 

jjDempsey Thaddeus Amacker Henry Joseph LeBlanc, Jr. 

iWilliam Edward Barker, III Robert Eugene Littlefield 

[Jack Bugna Frank J. MacEntee, SJ. 

iMichael Lory Campbell, III Thomas Eaton McCown 

Frederick Joseph Dillemuth, S.J. James Aloysius McKeough, S.J. 

riCarlton Ansell Foster Lubin Elie Mire 

JlStephen A. Garber, S.J. George M. Murray 

[George Barry Halliday Robert Lawrence Spooner 

[Eugene J. Hebert, S.J. Francis Quigley Vogtner 

iifohn Michael Hussey William Fenwick Wathen 

Bachelor of Science in Commerce 

i[ohn Robert Abell Raymond Robert Murphy 

IjCharles Henry Bellmann Paul Arthur Napolitano 

John Norman Firth John Oliver Vetter 

Frank A. Forrest Marion Francis Wilkins 
James Phillip Morgan 

July 23, 1948 

Bachelor of Arts 
Brother Malachy Holmes, S.C. Arthur Clifton Worsham 

Bachelor of Science 

John Joseph Canty James D. Martin 

cum laude Gutsavo Joseph Moreno, III 

lArthur C. Drago Frederick J. Ruiz 

Brother Leo Godin, S.C. Jeremiah M. Sullivan 

Bachelor of Science in Commerce 
j Edmund Raymond Cimino Oscar F. Johansen 

Roy Erskine Holland 



Page Ninety-five 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



Regular Session (1948-1949) 

(Explanation of Code: A — arts course; S — science course; C — commerce course; 1 — fresh- 
man; 2 — sophomore; 3 — junior; 4 — senior; 5 — postgraduate; a code symbol compounded 
from preceding appears in parentheses after the student's name in the following list.) 



ABBENE, C. A., (SI) 

Pine Bluff, Ark. 
Abbott, C. M., (S3) 
Robertsdale, Ala. 
Allen, A. R., (Si) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Allen, W. O., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Amorosi, J. T., (C2) 

Jersey City, N. J. 
Amsden, G. A., (S3) 

Bristol, Conn. 
Anderson, J. W., (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Andrews, J. M., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Artim, Michael, (S2) 

Beaver Meadows, Penn. 
Ashley, R. L., (SI) 

Shreveport, La. 
Avellino, Marshall, (S2) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Averett, T. R., Jr., (53) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Azar, D. A., (S3) 

Dothan, Ala. 
BAGGETT, J. L., (S3) 

Birmingham, Ala. 
Baisden, R. L., (SI) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Baker, W. C, (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bankhead, J. C, (C3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Barganier, Willie, (S2) 

Andalusia, Ala. 
Barker, Br. Lee, (A3) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Barrett, G. E., (SI) 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Page Ninety-six 



FULL TIME STUDENTS 

Barrineau, Thomas, (S4) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Barter, C. J., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bauler, R. J., (S2) 

Wheaton, 111. 
Beary, Br. Dean (A3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Becker, J. H., (CI) 

Dallas, Texas 
Beining, P. R., S.J., (S5) 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Bendillo, Br. Victor, (A3) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Benitez, Ray, (SI) 

New Orleans, La. 
Benito, J. R., (SI) 

Guayama, Puerto Rico 
Bennefield, J. I., (S2) 

Phcnix City, Ala. 
Benson, D. R., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Berdon, J. K., (S2) 

Natchez, Miss. 
Berger, N. J., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Berrier, L. W., Jr., (S4) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Berte, John, S.J., (A3) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Bcrtke, T. J., (CI) 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
Betbeze, S. J., Jr., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bethany, M. L., (C3) 

Toulminville, Ala. 
Bibb, J. T., (S2) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Billeaud, Allen, (S2) 

Lafayette, La. 



Bingham, J. U., S.J., (A3) 

Long Island, N. Y. . 
Bishop, J. G., (S3) 

Fairhope, Ala. 
Bishop, P. T., (S2) 

Elizabeth, N. J. 
Blackman, J. A., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bonham, P. D., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bonin, M. J., (S2) 

Kaplan, La. 
Boone, J. M., (S3) 

Jackson, Miss. 
Booth, M. O., (C4) 

Clearwater, Fla. 
Bosarge, J. K., (SI) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Bosarge, W. V., (CI) 

Bayou la Batre, Ala. 
Boudreaux, Albert, (A4) 

Opelousas, La. 
Boudreaux, C.P., S.J., (AS 

New Orleans, La. 
Boudreaux, P. H., (C3) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Bower, W. T., (C2) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Bowers, Br. Miguel (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bowles, J. F., (S4) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Boyle, C. J., (S3) 

Burlington, N. J. 
Bradley, F. W., (Al) 

Hickman Mills, Mo. 
Bradley, W. J., Ill, (S2) 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Brady, D. F., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 



I Brady, Br. Jordan, (A3) 

Daphne, Ala. 
■ Brasell, L. R., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Braud, L. P., (SI) 

Thibodaux, La. 
Brisolara, Br. Ashton, (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Brock, S. W., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Brou, Br. Glenn, (A3) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Browne, F., Jr., (S3) 

Asheville, N. C. 
Browning, J. P., (S2) 

Fort Smith, Ark. 
Bryant, B. F., Jr., (A2) 

Bay Minette, Ala. 
Buchanan, J. J., (S2) 

Pontiac, Mich. 
Buckley, R. C, (C2) 

Dallas, Texas 
Bufkin, J. C, (S2) 

Lucedale, Miss. 
Buitrago, H. G., (S3) 

Guayama, P. R. 
Bunkley, F. K., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Burke, J. R., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Burt, Jean A., (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Busbee, J. E., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Butler, Charles, Jr., (C4) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Byrd, J. C., (CI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Byrne, W. J., (CI) 

Natchez, Miss. 
CALAMETTI, J. JR., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Caldwell, F. A., (SI) 

Canton, Mass. 
Caley, J, R., (S3) 

River Forest, 111. 
Callahan, B. J., (SI) 

Whisder, Ala. 
Campbell, Br. A., (A3) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Cannamela, R. A., (S3) 

Middletown, Conn. 
Caranna, A. J., (SI) 

Gulfport, Miss. 
Carlin, J. H., (S3) 

Medford, Mass. 
Carpenter, W. B., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Carrazza, J. A., Jr., (SI) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Caruso, C. J., (SI) 

Greenville, Miss. 



Carwie, J. (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cassidy, L. D., Jr., (S2) 

Clayton, Mo. 
Cassidy, T. E., (A4) 

Jennings, La. 
Catuara, J. J., (SI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Cefalu, R. S., Jr., (CI) 

Helena, Ark. 
Chambers, S. A., (S2) 

Nashville, Tenn. 
Chamblin, A. S., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Chamblin, S. A., Jr., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Champagne, Br. N. (A3) 

Daphne, Ala. 
« Chapman, T. H., (S3) 

Beaumont, Texas 
Chavez, J. O., S.J., (A3) 

Albuquerque, N. M. 
Chinery, Br. Faber, (A3) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Clancy, Thomas, S.J., (S5) 

Helena, Ark. 
Clark, B. E., (A2) 

Louisville, Ky. 
Clarke, W. A., (S2) 

Bowling Green, Ky. 
Clawson, R. C, (S2) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Clement, J. F., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Clerkin, R. R., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Cliett, F. G., Jr., (A4) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Cloonan, Br. Stephen (Al) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Coakley, J. A., (C2) 

East Orange, N. J. 
Cochran, R. W., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Coleman, F. J., (C3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Coleman, Jack, (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Collier, H. J., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Collins, H. J., Jr., (SI) 

Dallas, Texas 
Colson, H. J., (SI) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Conley, J. F., (SI) 

Oak Park, 111. 
Conmay, F. E., Jr., (S3) 

Toledo, Ohio 
Conmay, T. P., (S3) 

Toledo, Ohio 
Conway, P. F., (CI) 

Detroit, Mich. 



Coogan, F., (C3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Cooley, G. F., S.J., (AS) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cooney, W. J., (S2) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Cordell, M. J., (Al) 

Phenix City, Ala. 
Corey, H., Jr., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cotten, T. A., (S2) 

Fairhope, Ala. 
Council, J. M., (SI) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Courchesne, J. N., (SI) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Cousins, E. H., S.J., (A3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Cox, J. E., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Crabtree, J. T., S.J., (A3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cramer, G. E., (C4) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Cratin, P. D., (S2) 

Sherrill, Ark. 
Crouch, J. A., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cuervo, J. B., (SI) 

New York, N. Y. 
Cummins, J. F., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Curran, M. J., (A2) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Curry, R. K., (S2) 

Blue Mtn. Lake, N. Y. 
Curtin, G. F., S.J., (A3) 

Knoxville, Tenn. 
Cush, C. J., (SI) 

Shreveport, La. 
DACOVICH, G. J., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Daly, J., (SI) 

Lafayette, Ala. 
Daly, T. F., (Al) 

Pelham, N. Y. 
Daly, W., (S3) 

Lafayette, La. 
Daugherty, H. G., (CI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Davis, C. H„ (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Davis, F. R., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Davis, J. A., (A3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Davis, J. A., (C3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Davis, J. L., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Debrow, C. L., (SI) 

New Orleans, La. 



Page Ninety-seven 



Degnan, J. E„ (57) 

Maiden, Mass. 
Deimel, J. A., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
DeLaParte, E. P., (S4) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Demeranville, S. J., (57) 

Mobile, Ala. 
DeMouy, M., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
DeRussy, E., S.J., (S3) 

New Orleans, La. 
DeSelle, L. H., (SI) 

Alexandria, La. 
Diamond, J. R., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
DiBona, N., (S2) 

Quincy, Mass. 
Dick, H. G., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Dickson, W. P., (C2) 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Diez, C, Jr., (SI) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Dimitry, J. R., (SI) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Donaghey, Br. Borgia (Al) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Donahue, J. F., (C2) 

Plainville, Conn. 
Doolan, J. }., Jr., (S4) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Doolan, W. S., (C2) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Dorn, E. G., (C2) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Dorsch, W. J., (A3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Downey, W. J., (C2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Doyle, W. J., (A2) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Duff, D. F., (SI) 

Little Rock, Ark. 
Duffy, E. F., (A3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Dugas, Br. Juan, (A3) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Dughi, C. H., (SI) 

Tampa, Fla. 
DuMont, S. P., Jr., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Duncan, J. N., (C3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Dunne, D. J., (C2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Durick, W. D., (A3) 

Bessemer, Ala. 
Dykes, H. W. H., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
EATON, G. R., (S2) 

Richmond, Va. 



Edgar, G. W., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Edwards, J. D., (A3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Edwards, R. W., (SI) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Egan, R., (CI) 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Elcan, P. D., (S2) 

Memphis, Tenn. 
Elosua, B. F., (SI) 

Monterrey, Mexico 
Enright, C, (A2) 

Miami, Beach, Fla. 
Enright, R., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Erhardt, R., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Escalante, C. C, (S3) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Escalante, W. C, (SI) 

Tampa, Fla. 
FAGET, BR. BOSCO, (Al) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Fagot, H. J., S.J., (A3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Farmer, C. J., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Fearn, J. A., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Fedor, R. E., (SI) 

Deerfield Beach, Fla. 
Fedor, R. L., (52) 

Deerfield Beach, Fla. 
Feil, P. J., (C2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Felis, J. D., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Fell, A. E., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ferlita, E. C, (A2) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Fey, B. J., (SI) 

Alexandria, La. 
Ficarrotta, F., (52) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Ficarrotta, J. S., (CI) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Finch, W. L., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Florez, A., (C2) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Flynn, J. M., (CI) 

Rochester, N. Y. 
Fogarty, J. J., Jr., (S2) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Fogelsanger, W. J., S.J., (S3) 

Hamburg, N. Y. 
Folsom, G. H., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Foreman, E. H., (A2) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Foster, C. H., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Freeman, W. E., S.J., (A4\ 

New Orleans, La. 
French, B. W., Jr., (57) 

Mobile, Ala. 
French, H. B., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Friedman, L. J., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Fuchs, E. M., (S3) 

Woodhaven, N. Y. 
Fumo, J. A., (CI) 

Chicago, 111. 
GABELLY, BR. T., (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Galloway, C. E., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Garbin, F. G., (S2) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Garcia, A. J., (S3) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Garcia, A. J., (S4) 

Guayama, Puerto Rico 
Garcia, A. R., (SI) 

Guayama, Puerto Rico 
Garraway, E. H., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Garraway, J. A., (SI) 

Irvington, Ala. 
Garriga, A., (C2) 

San Juan, Puerto Rico 
Gaul, R. J., (S4) 

Pittsfield, Mass. 
Geoghegan, M. H., (A2) 

Bardstown, Ky. 
Gideon, R. P., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Gier, R. E., (CI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Gilbert, E., Jr., (C2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Gilly, N., (S4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Gioscia, V. J., (SI) 

Rosedale, N. Y. 
Girod, M. K., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Glass, W. A., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Glover, J. H., (C2) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Gnann, G. B., (57) 

Deerfield, Fla. 
Godard, W. J., (57) 

Fairhope, Ala. 
Godwin, A. W., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Goldsby, J. W., Ill, (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Grantham, A. C, Jr., (54 

Mobile, Ala. 



Page Ninety-eight 



Gray, F., (S3) 

Miami, Fla. 
Greco, A. L., Jr., (C3) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Grider, J. F., (C2) 

Springfield, Ky. 
Grinstead, J. E., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Grumbly, G. P., (SI) 

Lake Worth, Fla. 
Guercio, T. J., (CI) 

Natchez, Miss. 
Guillory, V. R., (A2) 

Eunice, La. 
Guillot, M. A., Jr., (Si) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Guthans, R. A., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
HACKMEYER, J. F., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Halker, G. E., (52) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hall, J. Emmett, (S2) 

Staten Island, N. Y. 
Hall, W. M., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Halpin, G. A., (C2) 

East St. Louis, 111. 
Halsema, A. L., Jr. (S2) 

Miami, Fla. 
Hamel, E. G., Jr., (S2) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Hamrah, L. M., (S4) 

El Paso, Texas 
Hanchey, J. W., Ill, (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Harbin, T. F., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hardy, D. E., (CI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Harrison, L. J., (C4) 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Hartwell, G. E., Jr., (A2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hartzes, E. T„ (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Harwood, J. C., (A4) 

Alexandria, La. 
Harwood, R. R., (Al) 

Alexandria, La. 
Haskins, J. A., (C3) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Havens, G. P., (S4) 

Washington, D. C. 
Hawie, W. F., Jr., (C2) 

Fairhope, Ala. 
Hawkins, J. B., (S2) 

Richmond, Va. 
Hayes, W. H., Jr., (C2) 

Yazoo City, Miss. 
Hazen, R. C., (SI) 

San Diego, Calif. 



Hebert, R. J., (S3) 

Jennings, La. 
Heffernan, B. L., (C4) 

Sheffield, Ala. 
Heffernan, M. F., Jr., (CI) 

Memphis, Tenn. 
Hemker, T. A., (SI) 

Sandusky, Ohio 
Henley, W. B., (S2) 

Andalusia, Ala. 
Henry, J. P., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Herbert, H. W., (SI) 

Pelham, N. Y. 
Herold, V. R., (CI) 

Paterson, N. J. 
Herring, E., (S3) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Herron, W., Jr., (SI) 

Sparta, Tenn. 
Hickey, J. L., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Hickey, T. J., Jr., (Si) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hietter, J. G., (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hill, W. J., (A3) 

Dallas, Texas 
Hinckel, G. M., (S2) 

Croton-on-Hudson, N. Y. 
Hinton, J. L., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hogg, G. A., (CI) 

Richmond Hgts., Mo. 
Holcomb, B. T., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Holland, P. B., (CI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Hollingsworth, J. S., (S2) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Hollis, W. W., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Holloway, A. J., S.J., (A4) 

Shreveport, La. 
Holly, J. D., (C3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Honovich, J., Jr., (S3) 

Shreveport, La. 
Horstmann, R. B., S.J., (55) 

New Orleans, La. 
Houssiere, R. E., (A4) 

Jennings, La. 
Hudson, J. B., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hulcher, R. C, (S2) 

Portsmouth, Va. 
Hunley, Br. Denis (SI) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Hurley, D. J., (C2) 

Portsmouth, Va. 
IRBY, E. S., (C2) 

Prichard, Ala. 



JACKMOND, J. H., (SI) 

Longview, Wash . 
Jackson, Br. Alberic (A3) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Jackson, R. E., Jr., (CI) 

Somerville, N. J. 
Jacque, A. G., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Jarreau, N. J., S.J., (A4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Jenniskens, T., S.J., (A4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Jessie, R. M., (C2) 

Faust, N. Y. 
Johnley, J. F., Ill, (S4) 

Portsmouth, Ohio 
Johnson, C. M., Jr., (C2) 

Charleston, S. C. 
Johnson, H. E., (A4) 

Worcester, Mass. 
Johnson, P. D., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Johnston, E. R., (52) 

Tiffin, Ohio 
Jones, J. R., (C2) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Jones, W. E., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Joseph, J., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Joseph, W. F., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
KAGER, J. A., (C2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Kahler, H. V., (C2) 

Quincy, Mass. 
Kaufman, S. R., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Kearley, D. A. (A2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Kearley, J. H., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Kearley, M. G., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Kearns, J. C, (SI) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Keene, F. H., (C2) 

Bardstown, Ky. 
Kehoe, A. G., S.J., (S4) 

New York, N. Y. 
Keith, C, (S2) 

Easley, S. C. 
Kelly, J. F., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Kelly, J. J., (C2) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Kelly, T„ S.J., (A3) 

Boston, Mass. 
Kennedy, J. A., (C4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Kennedy, J. F., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Page Ninety-nine 



Kennedy, W. D., (SI) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Kettler, E. W., Jr., (SI) 

Helena, Ark. 
Kidwell, W. C, S.J., (S4) 

Montgomery, Ala. 
Kilborn, B. H., (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
King, J. A., (A2) 

Monticello, N. Y. 
Kirkland, R., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Kirsch, E. M., (SI) 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Klein, R. F„ (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Klein, W. M., (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Koch, Martin, (S3) 

Central Romana, D. R. 
Koch, P. H., S.J., (A3) 

Dallas, Texas 
Koch, T. J., (SI) 

Dallas, Texas 
Kresse, J. I., (S4) 

N. Little Rock, Ark. 
Kroner, F. M., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
LaCOLLA, E. M., (SI) 

Jamaica, N. Y. 
Lacy, J. I., Jr., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ladas, E. H., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
LaMar, D. R., (A2) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Lampley, W. P., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Landry, J. A., (C4) 

Port Arthur, Texas 
Langan, J. N., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Langan, M. J., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lannan, L., (A3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Larkin, J. V., (C2) 

Dallas, Texas 
LaSalle, A., (S2) 

New Iberia, La. 
Latalladi, J. J. (SI) 

Patillas, Puerto Rico 
Latham, E. C, (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Latham, R. (S3) 

Trenton, N. J. 
Lauten, R. C, Jr., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lauve, L. O., (SI) 

Alexandria, La. 
Larroque, Br. Lucian, (Al) 

Daphne, Ala. 



Layden, A. J., (C2) 

Forney, Texas 
Leavitt, J. M., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
LeBlanc, D., (C2) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
LeBlanc, C. J., Jr., (S2) 

Raceland, La. 
LeBlanc, L. P., Jr., (SI) 

Golden Meadow, La. 
LeBlanc, Br. Rene, (A3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Leech, W. H., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lee, G. S., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lee, R. E., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lee, T. P., (Al) 

Miami, Fla. 
Lee, W. H., Jr., (S3) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lemoine, D. J., (S3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Lenz, W. D., (S3) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Lemmon, Br. Noel, (A3) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Leon, F. E., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Leurck, E. D., (SI) 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Lewis, G., Jr., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Libby, R. G., (SI) 

York, Ala. 
Lilly, R. F., (C2) 

Pittsburg, Pa. 
Lindsey, W. H., (S3) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Little, E. E., Jr. (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Littlefield, D. J., (A2) 

Faust, N. Y. 
Lloyd, W. J., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Logan, W. E., Jr., (A2) 

Pass Christian, Miss. 
Logue, F., (S2) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Lomba, R. A., (S2) 

Santurce, Puerto Rico 
Lopez, E., (S2) 

Guayama, Puerto Rico 
Lorio, L. A., S.J., (S4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Lowry, J. E., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ludvigsen, D. R., (C4) 

Flomaton, Ala. 
Lund, R. E., (C4) 

Simi, Calif. 



Lynch, T. J., (S3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Lynch, W. R., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lyons, H. A., (Al) 

Tupper Lake, N. Y. 
McBREARTY, W., (52) 

Detroit, Mich. 
McBride, W. H., S.J., (S4) 

New York, N. Y. 
McCabe, J. P., (C3) 

Roslindale, Mass. 
McCafferty, R. E., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McCaffrey, R. A., (53) 

Birmingham, Ala. 
McCarthy, P. J., S.J., (S4) 

Rochester, N. Y. 
McCauley, W. C, S.J., (A4) 

Toledo, Ohio 
McClusky, R., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McConville, E. G., (SI) 

Cleveland, Ihio 
McCormick, H. T., (S2) 

Newark, N. J. 
McCourt, C. L., (CI) 

Pine Bluff, Ark. 
McDermott, J. P., Jr. (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McDonald, H. P., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McDonnell, J. E., (S2) 

Memphis, Tenn. 
McEvoy, E. T., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McFadden, S. F., Jr., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McGeagh, R. A., (S2) 

Detroit, Mich. 
McGinn, Larry C, (C2) 

Montgomery, Ala. 
McGranahan, J. M., (CI) 

Shreveport, La. 
McHardy, L., (S2) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Mclnerney, W. J., (52) 

Lowell, Mass. 
McKenzie, J. T., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McKeough, T. A., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
McKinney, J. N., (S2) 

Lucedale, Miss. 
McLendon, R. M., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McManus, W., (C3) 

New York, N. Y. 
McMillan, A. P., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McMillan, J. M., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Page One Hundred 



McMillan, R. A., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McMillan, S. M., (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McNay, J. S., (S2) 

Belleville, 111. 
McNiece, G. E., (S2) 

Houston, Texas 
McPhillips, J. D., (C4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
McQuillen, C. J., Jr., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McQuillen, W. J., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Mack, J. L., (52) 

Mobile, Ala. 
MacMahon, W. O., (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Madden, T. J., S.J., (A3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Magee, N. F., (S3) 

Lancaster, Pa. 
Maginnis, J. S., (C4) 

Louisville, Ky. 
Maisel, H. M., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Malloy, W. J., Jr., (A2) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Maloney, F. J. (SI) 

Wawatosa, Wis. 
Maloof, J. M., (CI) 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Mantell, P. G., Jr., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Markham, J. E., Jr., (C2) 

Rutland, Vt. 
Mark waiter, J. A., (C3) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Marrero, M. A., (S2) 

Arroyo, Puerto Rico 
Marroquin, C. A., (SI) 

Guatemala, C. A. 
Marston, J. C., (S3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Martin, J. P., (S3) 

Welsh, La. 
Martin, L. J., (SI) 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Martin, R. A., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Martinez, M. E., (S3) 

Guayama, Puerto Rico 
Martinez, R. D., (CI) 

Dallas, Texas 
Mason, A. A., (Al) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mason, M. M., (A2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Mason, W. E„ (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Mazzia, F. J., Jr., (S3) 

Hot Springs, Ark. 



Mercier, A. L., (SI) 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 
Merrifield, Br. D. (A3) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Mese, J. D., (S3) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Michel, M. M. ? (SI) 

Jackson, Miss. 
Michels, J. G., (Al) 

New York, N. Y. 
Michie, R. H„ (SI) 

Labadieville, La. 
Miklic, J., (A2) 

Demopolis, Ala. 
Miller, C. A., (C2) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Minto, J. G., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Moan, F. X., S.J., (A3) 

Baltimore, Md. 
Mobley, J. W., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Monica, L. T., (S3) 

Garyville, La. 
Monica, L. R., (SI) 

Garyville, La. 
Moore, L. J., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Moorehead, T. J., (CI) 

Wilmette, 111. 
Moran, W., S.J., (A5) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Morgan, J. J., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Morgan, J. F., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Morgan, W. E., (SI) 

Shreveport, La. 
Morris, W. F., Jr., (S3) 

North Bergen, N. J. 
Moss, W. T., (C4) 

Miami, Fla. 
Mugnier, J. R., Jr., (SI) 

New Orleans, La. 
Mullan, R. F., S.J., (A3) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mullins, W. I., (S4) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Murphy, J. G„ (SI) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
NAMAN, L. J., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Nashert, W. W., (S2) 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Nee, W. J., S.J., (S4) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Nelson, V. A., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Nester, W. A., Jr., (S2) 

East St. Louis, 111. 
Neuhoff, L., Ill, (CI) 

Ronoake, Va. 



Neville, J. W., (S2) 

East St. Louis, 111. 
Nobert, D. A., (C3) 

Memphis, Tenn. 
Noell, C. P., Jr., (S2) 

Clayton, Mo. 
Nobles, N. E., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Nolan, D. B., (Al) 

New York, N. Y. 
Nolan, S. T., (S2) 

Bayou la Batre, Ala. 
Nolan, W. W., (S3) 

Queens Village, N. Y. 
North, G. P., Jr., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Nusz, J. L., (S2) 

Bowling Green, Ky. 
OATES, W. M., (A2) 

Shreveport, La. 
Oberkirch, C. F., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
O'Brien, C. L., (S3) 

Newburyport, Mass. 
O'Brien, D., (A2) 

Albany, N. Y. 
O'Brien, J. A., (C4) 

Chicago, 111. 
O'Connor, D. L„ (C2) 

Houston, Texas 
O'Connor, F. C, S.J., (S3) 

New York, N. Y. 
O'Connor, N. K., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
O'Connor, W. J., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
O'Driscoll, V. B., Jr., (SI) 

Charleston, S. C. 
O'Keefe, J. B., (SI) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Olivier, J. L., (A2) 

Arnaudville, La. 
Olivier, J. F., (Al) 

Arnaudville, La. 
Ollinger, W. H., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Olney, R. B., (S2) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
O'Malley, T., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
O'Neill, C, S.J., (A3) 

New Orleans, La. 
O'Neil, J. M., (C3) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
0'Shaughnessey,S. J,* Jr. (SI) 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
O'Shea, Br. Kevin, (Al) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Outlaw, A. R., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Owens, R., S.J., (A3) 

Folly Beach, S. C. 



Page One Hundred One 



PADGETT, C. L., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Page, T. E., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Parham, J. A., (52) 

Semmes, Ala. 
Parker, J. C, (57) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Patrick, L. A., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Paulson, O. L., (57) 

Yazoo City, Miss. 
Peresich, E., (C3) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Petit, J. E., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Petit, P. P., (57) 

Lorman, Miss. 
Phillips, E. E., (S2) 

Dallas, Texas 
Phillips, J. W., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Phillips, W. M., (SI) 

Dallas, Texas 
Picard, A. A., Jr., (CI) 

Worcester, Mass. 
Pichard, G., (55) 

Tallahassee, Fla. 
Pierce, A. E., (S3) 

Savannah, Ga^ 
Pitman, J. A., (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Piatt, C. A., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Pocase, V. J., Jr., (51) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Porcella, Br. Edwin, (A3) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Porrata-Doria, O., (C3) 

Guayama, Puerto Rico 
Powers, J., (S4) 

Charleston, S. C. 
Price, C. O., Jr., (C2) 

Nashville, Tenn. 
Prokop, L. S., (S4) 

Shelton, Conn. 
Prud'homme, J. T., (S2) 

Pineland, Texas 
RABBY, J. W., (A3) 

Coden, Ala. 
Raben, L. W., Jr., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ragley, B., (SI) 

Dallas, Texas 
Ramsey, L. B., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ratcliff, J. N., (SI) 

Miami, Fla. 
Rayfield, Claude R., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Rebstock, Darwin J., (CI) 

Golden Meadows, La. 



Redden, J. J., (52) 

Chicago, 111. 
Rederscheid, D. J., (CI) 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Rhem, J. E., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Reidy, E. J., (57) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Reimer, H. E., Jr., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Reines, J., (SI) 

Guayama, Puerto Rico 
Reynolds, A. E., Jr., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ribelin, C. A., (CI) 

Dallas, Texas 
Richard, Br. Louis J., (Al) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Rieman, R. W., (S3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Riise, P. L., (55) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Rimes, R., S.J., (AS) 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Ring, P, F., Jr., (S2) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Roberts, R. T., (55) 

Wichita, Kans. 
Robichaux, A., Jr., (C3) 

Thibodaux, La. 
Robichaux, R. T. G., (A2) 

Thibodaux, La. 
Robinson, T. F., (S3) 

Semmes, Ala. 
Rodriguez, H. R., (SI) 

Santurce, Puerto Rico 
Roell, F. E., (C3) 

Jackson, Miss. 
Roell, P. A., (SI) 

Jackson, Miss. 
Rogers, T. F., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Rogers, T. R„ (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Rogge, N. J., S.J., (A4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Rojas, A. N., (A2) 

Merida, Yucatan, Mex. 
Rotner, M., (S3) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Rowley, J. E., (A3) 

Colebrook, Conn. 
Roy, H. F., (S3) 

Lafayette, La. 
Ruscitto, F., (S3) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Rush, M. W., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Russell, W. J., Jr., (C2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Ryan, G. W., Ill, (CI) 

Jamaica, N. Y. 



SALMON, M. J., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Salter, O. C, (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sapp, J. E., (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sarullo, S. A., (SI) 

Greenville, Miss. 
Saunders, J. T., Jr., (52) 

Quincy, Mass. 
Savoie, F. H., (SI) 

Belle Rose, La. 
Schafer, J., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Schambeau, T. A., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Schatzle, J., (S3) 

Cold Springs, N. Y. 
Schiro, N. T., S. J., (A3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Schmitt, W. J., S.J., (55) 

New York, N. Y. 
Schneider, R. M., (S3) 

Fairhope, Ala. 
Schnell, G. R., (A3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Schrader, A. H., (CI) 

San Antonio, Fla. 
Schutzman, R. S., (C2) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Schwartzel, F. B., (S3) 

Louisville, Ky. 
Schweers, J. N., Jr., (55) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Schwing, G. E., (C4) 

New Iberia, La. 
Schwing, P., (S2) 

New Iberia, La. 
Schwing, P., (A2) 

New Iberia, La. 
Scotto, A. P., (S2) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Sekul, A. A., (S2) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Sellers, J. W., (A4) 

Headland, Ala. 
Sellers, L. K., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sells, R. H., Jr., (57) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Serda, P. C, (57) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Shackelford, T. B., (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Shannon, H. I., Jr., (57) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Shannon, S. A., Jr., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Shea, W. C, (A3) 

Chelmsford, Mass. 
Sheffield, E. J., (Al) 

Savannah, Ga. 



Page One Hundred Two 



Sheffield, H. S., (S4) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Shine, T. F., (CI) 

Dallas, Texas 
Shinnick, C. E., (57) 

Evanston, 111. 
Shropshire, A. T., Jr., (52) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Simms, J. B., (S3) 

Springfield, Ky. 
Simpson, J. C, (S2) 

Pass Christian, Miss. 
Singler, J. L., (52) 

Sandusky, Ohio 
Skidmore, J. R., (A2) 

La Grange, 111. 
Skivo, A. M., (C2) 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Slaton, H. C., Jr., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Smith, J. F., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Smith, R. L., (C2) 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Smith, R. E., (57) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Snelling, J. A., (C4) 

Spartanburg, S. C. 
Soto, P. J., Jr., (57) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Spanyer, R. M., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Spears, E. N., (52) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Spence, L. D., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Spitalier, G. A., (CI) 

Mexico City, Mexico 
Stahl, G. J., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Stallone, M. J., (CI) 

Natchez, Miss. 
Stanley, J. F., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Stavrakos, H. J., (52) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Steinbach, T. L., (57) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Steiner, J. R., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Stephens, R. J., (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Stiegler, H., S.J., (A3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Stodder, D., (A4) 

Chicago, 111. 
Stodder, J. H., (A2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Stouter, V. P., S.J., (A4) 

Jersey City, N. J. 
Strickland, D. O., (57) 

Pensacola, Fla. 



Stringfellow, G. V., (57) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Striplin, L. D., (57) 

Selma, Ala. 
Stubbers, J. C, (C2) 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Suarez, J. W., (S3) 

New York, N. Y. 
Suhrer, S. W., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sullivan, E. M., (57) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Sullivan, J. J., (S2) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Sullivan, J. F., (S3) 

Hyde Park, Mass. 
Swan, J. L., (57) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Swedenburg, C. J., (A3) 

Akron, Ohio 
Sweeney, J. F., S.J., (A3) 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
TAIT, J. E., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Talbert, T. S., Jr., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Talbott, C, (S3) 

Louisville, Ky. 
Tanner, A. D., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Tanner, J. C, (S2) 

Mobile^ Ala. 
Taquino, T. P., (S2) 

New Orleans, La. 
Taylor, H., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Taylor, R. L., (57) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Terrell, C. P., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Tew, A. S., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Tew, J. T., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Thomas, J. C, (C3) 

Aiken, S. C. 
Thompson, D. S., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Thompson, F. H., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Thompson, M. E., Jr., (57) 

Aberdeen, Miss. 
Thompson, P. R., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Tiblier, E. J., S.J., (55) 

New Orleans, La. 
Toner, Br. Cyril, (A2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Tonne, R. A., (S3) 

Lombard, 111. 
Toomey, P. H., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Towner, D. A., (C4) 

Chicago, 111. 
Tremmel, R. M., (C3) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Tuero, M., Jr., (C2) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Turk, T. W., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Turner, L. M., Jr., (57) 

Dallas, Texas 
Twomey, J. J., Jr., (C2) 

Tampa, Fla. 
URRUELA, R. E., (A4) 

Miami, Fla. 
VALDES, R. L., JR., (CI) 

Monterrey, Mexico 
Valdes, V., (A3) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Velasquez, M. E., (CI) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Vessels, J. L., S.J., (A3) 

McAllen, Texas 
Victor, J., (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Villaverde, A. E., S.J., (A5) 

El Paso, Texas 
Vollmer, R. W., Jr., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
WAGNER, D. B., (57) 

Louisville, Ky. 
Wakely, T. J., (57) 

San Antonio, Texas 
Walle, J. G., S.J., (AS) 

New Orleans, La. 
Walsh, F. B., (57) 

Fitchburg, Mass. 
Walsh, J. G., (52) 

Newark, N. J. 
Walsh, W. H., S.J., (A5) 

New Orleans, La. 
Ward, W. A., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Warren, G. E., (CI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Watson, F. G., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Webb, J. A., (57) 

Helena, Ark. 
Weber, E., (S2) 

Belle Harbor, N. Y. 
Weber, W. J., S.J., (S5) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Wells, J. E., Jr., (C2) 

Laurel, Miss. 
Welsh, J. B., S.J., (A4) 

Shreveport, La. 
Wessely, E. E., (C2) 

Gadsden, Ala. 
White, C. F., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
White, W. H., (57) 

Quincy, Mass. 



Page One Hundred Three 



Whitehead, L. E., (S4) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Whitten, R. S., Jr., (S4) 

Shreveport, La. 
Whittington, L. E., Jr., (C2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Williams, D. B., (C2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Williams, J. E., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Williams, R. E., Ill, (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Willis, C. H., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Wilson, D. M., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Wilson, H. E., (SI) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Wilson, J. H., Jr., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Wilson, J. P., (S3) 

Pascagola, Miss. 
Wood, D. H., (A2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
YELVERTON, C. L., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Yerger, R. M., (S2) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Yon, K. S., Jr., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
ZAMBRANO, F., (CI) 

Monterrey, Mexico 
Ziegler, W. J., (SI) 

Sea Cliff, N. Y. 
Zietz, R. J., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Zimlich, L. E., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 



PART TIME STUDENTS 



Aldecoa, Rosemary 
Allen, Helen Kowaleski 
Atkinson, Rachel 
Await, Margaret Lorane 
Bickenheuser, Martha Lou 
Bishop, Doris 
Bosarge, Garnet M. 
Boutwell, Doris 
Bourg, Patricia Marion 
Brittain, Jane H. 
Bryant, Mary Evelyn 
Cannon, Jo Del 
Caylor, Dorothy Christine 
Christopher, Lila Jean 
Clark, Mary Lou 
Clay, Vergie E. 
Clower, Harriett Fay 
Connick, Mary Genevieve 
Cooley, Myrtis 
David, Edna 
Delmas, Lois Rosina 
Denk, Anna Dell 
Driver, Edna 
Duffy, Delia Josephine 
Dunn, Katherine 
Easley, Sara Lou 
Edhegard, Margaret P. 
England, Evelyn Frederic 
Fabre, Joyce Margaret 
Farmer, Libbie 
Felis, Dorothy 
Ferrouillat, Marjorie 
Foxhall, Louise Mary 
Frederick, Rosemerle 
Fuzzell, Mary F. 
Galbraith, Mrs. Sybil 
Garner, Annie Ruth 
Gates, Bobbie Winifred 
Giles, Doris Ruth 
Glenos, Nina 



Goetz, Rev. Charles, S.J. 
Gunn, Nell 

Gunthorpe, Constance C. 
Harbison, Theoline 
Hardin, Annie Louise 
Hasken, Juanita 
Hasting, Doris Eva 
Hay, Lois 

Heath, Beverly Jean 
Henderson, Maureen Helen 
Hendrix, Nola Mae 
Heubach, Shirley M. 
Hobbs, Lucille 
Hoi den, John 
Hurley, Ann Mary 
Hyland, Jessie Lorena 
Johnson, Anna Louise 
Johnson, Helen 
Johnson, Mary Eleanor 
Johnston, Mildred Louise 
Jones, Betty J. 
Kelleher, Betty 
Kelley, Esther Mae 
Kern, Juanita E. 
Lindsey, Juanita June 
Loftin, Betty Lou 
McCutcheon, Dorothy L. 
McNamara, Patricia 
McRoy, Cecile E. 
Marbury, Jessie L. 
Miller, Doris 
Minahan, Faye 
Mixon, Devida Donis 
Moncrief, Ann 
Moore, Edna 
Morris, Ella D. 
Napolitano, Paul A. 
Neeley, Sr. Mary Ann 
Nespor, Edna Louise 
Nix, Hazel Elinan 



Norris, Jeanette 
Orso, Cecilia 
Patterson, Carolyn 
Peavy, Nadine 
Phillips, Sr. Stanislaus 
Pierce, Shirley , 
Reynolds, Regina , 
Rochleau, Patricia Lucille 
Roh, Geraldine 
Samuelson, Mona Jane 
Scarbrough, Helen 
Schreiner, Elizabeth I. 
Schwelm, Charlotte L. 
Schumer, Sister Alberta 
Sindik, Gloria 
Snypes, Doris Virginia 
Sprinkle, Wilhelmina 
Summers, Betty Ruth 
Sutherland, Elwanda 
Tanner, Shirley Ann 
Taylor, Myrtle Isabelle 
Taylor, Vermelle F. 
Taylor, Willie Gray 
Thomas, Sr. Vincent 
Trigg, E. M. 
True, Sarah Margaret 
Turner, Ida Mae 
Walley, Margaret 
Weaver, Lily Brunette 
Webb, Jimmie Ruth 
White, Patricia 
White, Patty Jo 
Williams, Evelyn Lassiter 
Williams, Kay E. 
Willis, Elsie Lee 
Winberg, Barbara 
Winters, Nell Frances 
Wright, Betty Jean 
Wright, Marjorie 



Page One Hundred Four 



Summer Session (1948) 



j Adams, Thomas 

Allen, William O. 

Alworth, Raymond B. 
[Armbrecht, Lucile 
iBarrineau, Thomas L. 
iBeary, Bro. Dean 

Beining, Paul R., S.J. 
|Berrier, Lawrence W., Jr. 

Berte, John, S.J. 

Beuttenmuller, Paul, S.J. 

Bibb, John 

Billeaud, Allen 

Bingham, John, S.J. 

Bishop, J. G., Jr. 

Bluhm, Bro. Harold 

Boazman, Mrs. Myrtle H. 

Boggan, Sr. M. Ursula 
I Boooth, Milton Oliver 

Boudreaux, Albert John 

Boudreaux, Claude P., S.J. 

Boudreaux, Paul Howard 

Bower, Walter T. 

Bowers, Bro. Miguel 

Bowles, John F. 

Brady, Sr. M. Matthew 

Britton, Warner A. 

Brooks, E. Carroll 

Brown, Mrs. Margaret G. 

Bryant, B. F., Jr. 

Bryant, George 

Bunkley, Frank K., Jr. 

Busbee, John Edward 

Byrd, Jack 

Calametti, John A., Jr. 

Cancienne, Patrick 

Cannamela, Romolo A. 

Canty, John Joseph 

Carpenter, William B., Jr. 

Carubba, Bro. Martial 

Cassidy, Sr. M. Philippa 

Cazenavette, Jean J., S.J. 

Champagne, W. L., S.J. 

Chamblin, Stuart, A., Jr. 

Chavers, Mrs. Opal G. 

Chunn, Van D., Jr. 

Cimino, Edmund R. 

Ciraolo, Bro. Sebastian 

Clancy, T. H., S.J. 

Clawson, Robert 

Cliett, F. G., Jr. 

Coco, Francis J., S.J. 

Colao, Sr. M. Francesca 
] Coleman, Franklin J. 
j Coleman, Jack T. 

Colin, Bro. Stanley 

Coojey, George F., S.J. 
1 Costello, George Wm. 



Courchesne, John N. 
Cox, James E. 
Cramer, George E. 
Cronin, T. J., S.J. 
Cummins, John Fordney 
Donahue, F. X., S.J. 
Donnelly, Joseph T., S.J. 
Davis, Charles Hollis 
Davis, John A. 
Davis, Joseph Lee, Jr. 
Davis, Wallace J. 
Delaney, Sr. Maura 
de la Parte, Edward 
DeMouy, Martin 
Devitt, Bro. Gwyn 
Donivan, Sr. M. Aloysia 
Donivan, Sr. M. Matilda 
Doolan, John J. 
Doyle, Bro. Walter 
Drago, Arthur C. 
Driscoll, Mrs. Bertie S. 
Duncan, James N. 
Dykes, Hiram W. H. 
Edgar, George 
Edwards, John D. 
Ellis, Mary Louise 
Fagot, H. J., S.J. 
Farrelly, Bro. Elbert 
Fearn, Joseph Allen 
Felis, Dorothy Claire 
Felis, John D. 
Ferlita, Ernest Charles 
Ficarrotta, Frank R. 
Flock, Mary Margaret 
Floyd, Harold L. 
Fogelsanger, Walter J., S.J. 
Ford, Mrs. Cecil B. 
Freeman, Warren E., S.J. 
Galloway, Clyde E. 
Galligan, Sr. Eleanor 
Gaul, Richard J. 
Gay, Edward J. 
Geil, Arthur E. 
Geoghegan, Malcolm 
Gibbons, Bro. Terence 
Gideon, Richard P., Jr. 
Gilbert,Edward A., Jr. 
Gillin, Thomas M., S.J. 
Gilly, Sidney J., S.J. 
Godard, William Joseph 
Godin, Bro. Leo 
Gray, Frank E., Jr. 
Green, Kate E. 
GremUlion, Kenneth E. 
Guarino, Bro. Alexander 
Guillot, M. A., Jr. 
Guthans, Robert A. 



Hackmeyer, Joseph F. 
Halpin, Sr. M. Ambrose 
Hanchey, John Wesley, III 
Hanko, Bro. Samuel 
Harbin, Thomas F. 
Harrison, Lawrence J. 
Hartzes, Evans Tito 
Harwood, John C. 
Hatrel, T. J.,S.J. 
Havens, George P. 
Hawie, W. F., Jr. 
Hebert, Richard J. 
Heffernan, Bernard L. 
Hein, John L., S.J. 
Henley, Walter B. 
Herring, Ernest A. 
Hilbert, Duval J., S.J. 
Hill, John Jep 
Hinton, John Lawrence 
Holden, Vera DeBiggs 
Holland, Roy E. 
Holloway, Alvin J., S.J. 
Holmes, Bro. Malachy 
Honovich, Joe, Jr. 
Horstmann, R. B., S.J. 
Houssiere, Robert E. 
Hudson, Abbie A. 
Hulcher, Ralph C. 
Hurley, Daniel J. 
Jarreau, Joseph N., S.J. 
Jenniskens, Thomas, S.J. 
Johansen, Oscar F. 
Johnson, Claude M., Jr. 
Johnson, Paul Douglas 
Johnston, Annal Louise 
Jung, Bro. Arthur 
Kearley, James Herman 
Kearley, Marion G. 
Kearney, Sr. M. Immaculata 
Kehoe, Arthur G., S.J. 
Kelly, John F. 
Kennedy, James A. 
Kennedy, John F. 
Kenny, Bro. Damian 
Kidwell, William C, S.J. 
Kness, Anton M., S.J. 
Koch, Martin R. 
Kresse, Joseph 
Kroner, Frederick M., Jr. 
Laffan, Sr. Mary Antonio 
Laffan, Sr. M. Catherine 
Lambert Myrl H. 
Lamfers, William P. 
Landry, John Anthony 
Langan Marshall J., Jr. 
Lange, Sr. M. Leo 
Larkin, John V. 



Page One Hundred Five 



Latham, Robert W. 
Lauten, Roy C, Jr. 
LeBlanc, Daniel Wallace 
LeBlanc, Bro. Rene 
Lee, George S. 
Leininger, Charles A., S.J. 
Lilley, A. Edward 
Lindsey, Wm. W., Jr. 
Little, Earl E., Jr. 
Lorio, Bro. Farrel 
Lorio, Lloyd A., S.J. 
Lovett, Sr. Mary Alice 
Ludvigsen, Donald R. 
Lund, Robert 
Lynan, William R. 
Lyon, William M. 
McBride, William H., S.J. 
McCaffrey, Raymond A., Jr. 
McCarthy, Paul J., S.J. 
McCauley, Walter C, S.J. 
McDermott, John, Jr. 
McGeogh, R. A. 
McGhee, Sr. Dolores 
McGowin, Joseph F. 
McHardy, Louis W. 
McKenzie John T., Jr. 
McKinney, John N. 
McLinskey, Bro. Mel 
McPhillips, James D. 
McNamara, Patricia 
McQuillen, William J. 
Macgowan, Evander, S.J. 
MacMahon, William O., Ill 
Maginnis, James Stafford 
Marrero, Manuel Antonio 
Martin, James Dawson 
Martin, Robert Akers 
Mason, Milton M. 
Mason, Walter E. 
Mazzia, Ferd J., Jr. 
Mese, J. D. 

Mendelson, Bro. Sherwin 
Messonnier, Bro. Rian 
Miklic, John A. 
Moan, Francis, S.J. 
Mobley, John W. 
Moccia, Bro. Regis 
Moore, John, S.J. 
Morell, Victor Manuel 
Moreno, Gus 
Morgan, James T. 
Morris, Ella D. 
Mosley, A. J. 
Mullan, Robert, S.J. 
Mullen, Bro. Dermot 
Myers, Alice Ruth 
Nee, W. J., S.J. 
Nelson, George D., Jr. 
Nelson, Olive 
Noell Charles P. 



Nolan, William W. 
North, G. P., Jr., S/Sgt. 
Oates, Walter McMain 
Oberkirch, Charles F. 
O'Connor, Francis C, S.J. 
O'Connor, Norman K. 
Olivier, John L. 
O'Neil, Bro. Clifford 
O'Neill, John M., Jr. 
Outlaw, Arthur Robert 
Owens, Robert, S.J. 
Padgett, Charles L. 
Palmer, Mary Alice 
Parham, John A. 
Peabody, Bro. Evan 
Peresich, Edward R. 
Perkins, Albert H. 
Phillips, Sidney C, Jr. 
Pierce, Arthur E., Jr. 
Pitman, John 

Porrata-Doria, Orlando, Jr. 
Powers, Joseph M. 
Przytulski, Bro. Sigmund 
Puckett, A. S., Jr. 
Quina, Sr. Mary Alcuin 
Ramsey, Lucius B. 
Rehm, John E. 
Reimer, Henry 
Reinecke, Bro. Roy 
Repp, Mrs. Florence C. 
Reynolds, Bro. Neil 
Riggins, Mrs. Daisy A. 
Rimes, Robert B., S.J. 
Ringloff, Bro. Joseph 
Rippa, Leonard I. 
Ritchie, Joseph T. 
Roberts, Robert T. 
Robertson, Kathleen K. 
Robinson, Sr. M. Brendan 
Rogge, Norman J., S.J. 
Rollins, Elwood Lindsay 
Ross, Nancy 
Roussell, Bro. James 
Rowell, Neal P. 
Roy, Harmon F. 
Ruiz, Fred 

St. Louis, Joseph A., Jr. 
San Marco, Salvator J., S.J. 
Sanders, William Gillis 
Savoie, Donald J. 
Schaffer, William J., Jr. 
Schmitt, William J., S.J. 
Schneider, Robert 
Schumer, Sr. Alberta 
Schutzman, Robert S. 
Schwartzel, Frank B. 
Schweers, Joseph Noel, Jr. 
Schwing, George Edward 
Sekul, Anthony A. 
Shaw, Raymond J., Jr. 



Shaughnessy, Edgar, S.J. 
Sheffield, Henry S. 
Shirvell, Bro. Raymond 
Skidmore, James R. 
Smith, Gordon, III 
Smith, Kenneth 
Stahl, Doris 
Stahl, Gustav John 
Stano, Sr. M. Nathanael 
Staub, E. J., S.J. 
Stiegler, Hilliard, S.J. 
Steiner, James R. 
Stodder, Joseph 
Stouter, Vincent P., S.J. 
Suarez, James M. 
Suhrer, Samuel W. 
Sullivan, Jeremiah M. 
Sweeney, Joseph, S.J. 
Tanner, Alton D. 
Taylor, Harvell 
Taylor, Mrs. Marie H. 
Tew, Arthur S. 
Tew, John T. 
Thompson, Francis Hays 
Tiblier, Edgar J., S.J. 
Tibor, Sally Ann 
Toomey, Paul H. 
Tosta, J. Vincente 
Tremmel, Robert M. 
Tunstall, Ursula Ina 
Turk, Theo. W. 
Turnage, Conine A. 
Urruela, Rudolph E. 
Villaverde, Antonio E., S. 
Vollmer, Richard 
Vosburg, Velma Jones 
Walle, Julius G., S.J. 
Walsh, William H., S.J. 
Watson, Francis G. 
Weber, Edward 
Weber, William J., S.J. 
Welsh, John, S.J. 
Wenzel, Bro. Cyran 
White, Charles Fox 
White, Edward P. 
White, Oscar L. 
Whitehead, Leslie E. 
Williams, David Byron 
Williams, F. Seaman 
Willis, Claude H., Jr. 
Wilson, Joseph H, Jr. 
Wilson, J. P. 
Wintzell, Francis 
Wohlbruck, Bro. Kostka 
Wood, Gloria 
Woodham, Herbert C. 
Worsham, Arthur C. 
Wright, Mrs. Sara B. 
Zibilich, Bro. Foster 
Zimlich, Leon E. 



Page One Hundred Six 



Summary of Enrollment 

Number of Students 

Regular Session — Full Time 730 

Regular Session — Part Time 121 

Summer Session, 1948 347 

Total Gross Enrollment 1198 

ess Duplication 195 

Total Net Enrollment 1003 



Summary of Full Time Enrollment 



By Classes: 

Freshmen 234 

Sophomores 220 

Juniors 181 

Seniors 83 

Postgraduates 12 

By Place of Residence: 

Alabama 308 

Arkansas 10 

California 2 

Connecticut 5 

District of Columbia 1 

Florida 52 

Georgia 24 

Illinois 39 

Kansas — 1 

Kentucky 1 1 

Louisiana 71 

Maryland 1 

Massachusetts 17 

Michigan 8 

Mississippi _— 30 

Missouri 1 1 

New Jersey 11 

New Mexico 1 



By Divisions: 

Arts _.„ 1 2 

Sciences 4 1 8 

Commerce - 192 



New York 39 

North Carolina 1 

Ohio 9 

Oklahoma „. 2 

Pennsylvania 6 

South Carolina 7 

Tennessee 10 

Texas 24 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

Wisconsin 

Central America 

Dominican Republic 

Greece 

Mexico 5 

Puerto Rico _. 13 



Page One Hundred Seven 



INDEX 



Absences, 29 
Academic calendar, iv 
Academic regulations, 29 
Accounting, courses in, 66 
Administration, officers of, 4 
Admission, 19 
Advanced standing, 20 
Amount of work, 30 
Athletics, 27 
Attendance, 27 
Awards, 42 

Banking and finance, 
curriculum in, 52 

Bequests, 44 

Biology, courses in, 60 

Business administration, 
courses in, 67 

Business, curriculum in 
general, 52 

Calendar, academic, iv 
Chemistry, courses in, 62 
Classics, courses in, 63 
Commerce, courses in, 66 
Committees of faculty, 11 
Costs, 37 

Courses of instruction, 59 
Credo of Spring Hill, 12 
Curricula, programs of, 47 
Cuts, 29 

Debating, 27 

Deficiency examinations, 30 

Degrees conferred, 22, 95 

Degrees, reqirements for, 36 

Discipline, 24 

Dismissal, 24, 31 

Economics, courses in, 69 
Education, courses in, 70 
Educational objectives, 21 
Employment, 41 
Engineering, courses 

in, 53, 72 
English, courses in, 73 
Examinations, 30 



Faculty, 5 

Fees, 37 

French, courses in, 79 

German, courses in, 80 
Gifts and bequests, 44 
Governors, board of, 3 
Grading, 35 

Graduation requirements, 34 
Greek, courses in, 61 
Grounds and buildings, 16 

History, courses in, 75 
History of the college, 15 
Honors at graduation, 35 

Industrial management, 
curriculum in, 51 

Language proficiency 

tests, 31, 47 
Latin, courses in, 64 
Law, courses preparatory 

to, 53, 55 
Library, 17 
Living accommodations, 18 

Mathematics, courses in, 76 
Medical services, 38 
Merchandising, curriculum 

in, 53 
Music, courses in, 81 

National teacher 

examination, 57 
Nurses, courses for, 33 

Objectives, educational, 21 
Officers of administration, 4 
Organizations, student, 26 

Part-time courses, 32 
Philosophy, courses in, 83 
Physical education, courses 

in, 84 
Physics, courses in, 85 
Plans of study, 47 
Political science, courses 

in, 87 



Practice teaching, 58 
Pre-dental course, 55 
Pre-medical course, 55 
Prescribed studies, 36 
Prizes and awards, 42 
Probation, 20, 31 
Programs of curricula, 47 
Psychology, courses in, 88 

Quality points, 34 

Rebates, 39 

Register of students, 96 
Registration, iv 
Religion, courses in, 88 
Religious counsellor, 25 
Religious life, 25 
Reports of scholarship, 31 
Requirements for the 

degrees, 36 
Residence halls, 18 

Saturday courses, 32 
Scholarships, 40 
Servicemen, provision for, 26 
Social science, curriculum 

in, 51 
Sociology, courses in, 89 
Spanish, courses in, 80 
Special students, 20 
Speech, courses in, 91 
Student assistance, 41 
Student government, 26 
Student organizations, 26 
Students, classification of, 31 
Summer session, 32 

Teaching certificate, 56 
Teaching, course prepara- 
tory to, 56 
Transcript, 32 
Treasurer's regulations, 38 
Trustees, 3 

Veterans' education, 26 
Vocational objectives, 22 

Withdrawal, 31 



Page One Hundred Eight 



M.ttUUSV 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 



# * • # # 






• f 



.« • * # # 



--K 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR ONE HUNDRED TWENTIETH 
ACADEMIC YEAR 

1950-1951 



PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 

MOBILE • SPRING HILL STATION . ALABAMA 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Academic Calendar v 

Administration and Faculty 1 

Trustees and Governors 3 

Administration 4 

Officers of Instruction 5 

Committees of the Faculty 10 

General Information and Regulations 1 1 

General Information 13 

Admission Requirements and Educational Objectives 16 

The Government and the Welfare of the Students 22 

Academic Regulations 25 

Programs of Curricula 29 

Fees and Expenses 39 

Scholarships and Student Aid 42 

Requirements for Graduation 43 

Prizes and Trophies 45 

Gifts and Bequests 47 

Credo of Spring Hill 48 

Courses of Instruction and Register of Students 49 

Departments of Instruction 51 

Biology 51 

Chemistry 53 

Classical Languages 55 

Commerce 57 

Education 61 

Engineering 62 

English 63 

History 64 

Mathematics 65 

Modern Languages 66 

Music 68 

Philosophy 70 

Physical Education 71 

Physics 72 

Political Science 72 

Psychology 73 

Religion 73 

Sociology 74 

S/wr/z 75 

Degrees Conferred 77 

Register of Students 79 



. 



CORPORATE TITLE 

Spring Hill College 

Spring Hill (Mobile Co.) 

Alabama 

ACCREDITED BY 

Alabama State Department of Education 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Board of Regents of the University of the State of New Yorl(ji 

American Medical Association 

MEMBER OF 

Association of American Colleges 

American Council of Education 

National Catholic Education Association 

American Library Association 

National Council of Independent Schools 

Educational Records Bureau 

American Association for the Advancement of Science 

Jesuit Educational Association 

Association of Alabama Colleges 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR, 19504951 



Summer Session, 1950: June 12- July 21. 
Regular Session, 1 950-1 951. 



1950 



September 


12-15 


September 


15 


September 


18 


September 


28 


September 


30 


November 


1 


November 


7-10 


November 


11 


November 


22 


November 


27 


December 


8 


December 


20 


1951 




January 


3 


January 


22 



January 


29 


January 


30 


February 


5-6 


February 


10 


March 


22-28 


March 


29 


April 


18 


May 


3 


May 


24 


May 


29 


May 


31 



FALL SEMESTER 



Registration and Orientation for Freshmen. 

Registration for upperclassmen. 

Classes begin; fine for late registration. 

Mass of the Holy Spirit celebrated in College Chapel. 

Condition examinations from the preceding semester. 

Feast of All Saints. Holiday. 

Annual Spiritual retreat. 

Celebration of annual requiem Mass for deceased alumni and faculty. 

Thanksgiving recess begins at noon. 

Classes resume on regular schedule. 

Feast of the Immaculate Conception; no classes meet. 

Christmas recess begins at noon. 

Classes resume on regular schedule. 

Beginning of examinations for the semester; registration for the spring 
semester. 

SPRING SEMESTER 

Registration of new students for spring semester. 

First classes of spring semester; fine for late registration. 

Mardi Gras Holiday. 

Conditional examinations from preceding semester. 

Easter holidays. 

Classes resume. 

Solemnity of St. Joseph, Patron of the College. Holiday. 

Ascension Thursday. Comprehensive Examinations for Seniors. 

No classes. 
Final examinations begin. 
Annual commencement exercises. 
Last examinations and end of the semester. 



Summer Session, 1951: June 11-July 21. 



ADMINISTRATION 

AND 

FACULTY 




##^' 



TRUSTEES AND GOVERNORS 



TRUSTEES OF THE CORPORATION 

Very Reverend W. Patrick Donnelly, s.j. 

Reverend Sidney A. Tonsmeire, s.j. 

Reverend John A. Cronin, s.j. 

Reverend John A. Gasson, s.j. 

Reverend Andrew C. Smith, s.j. 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

(This board, organized in 1931, is responsible for the supervision 
and administration of the endowment fund for the college.) 



Very Reverend W. Patrick Donnelly, s.j., Chairman ex-officio 

Reverend Joseph M. Walsh, s.j. 

Matthias M. Mahorner, a.m., ll.b., ll.d. 

David R. Dunlap 

Gordon Smith, sr. 

James C. van Antwerp, b.s. 



Bulletin of Information Page Three 



ADMINISTRATION 



OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE 

Very Reverend W. Patrick Donnelly, s.j., a.m., President 

Reverend Andrew C. Smith, s.j., ph.d., Dean of the College 

Reverend John A. Cronin, s.j., a.m., Treasurer 

Reverend Joseph Michael Paul Walsh, s.j., m.a., Dean of Men 

Louis J. Boudousquie, m.s., Registrar 



OFFICIALS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Mrs. Florence M. Bare, b.s., Dietician 

Alvin Buckhaults, Golf Instructor 

Joanne Chandler, b.s. (lib. sci.), Assistant Librarian 

Norborne R. Clark, jr., a.b., m.a., m.d., Attending Physician 

Reverend Arthur Colkin, s.j., a.b., Director of Intramural Athletics 

William Gardiner, a.b., Athletic Coach 

Marie Yvonne Jaubert, a.b., m.a., b.l.s., Librarian 

Jean Keller, Assistant to the Registrar 

Mrs. Albert Levet, r.n., Director of the Infirmary 

Paul A. Napolitano, b.s.c, Assistant Athletic Coach 

Reverend John A. Sweeney, s.j., a.b., Student Counsellor 

Joseph G. Tyrrell, a.b., Bursar 
Reverend John T. Walsh, s.j., a.m., Director of Athletics 



Page Four Spring Hill College 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



Harold Gurganus Allen, b.s.c, Instructor in Accounting. 
B.S.C., Spring Hill College, 1937. 
Instructor in Accounting, Spring Hill College, 1946-. 

Arnold J. Benedetto, s.j., ph.d., Assistant Professor of Philosophy and 
Chairman of the Department. 

A.B., St. Louis University, 1937; Ph.D., Gregorian University, 1948. 
Instructor in Classical Languages and History, St. Charles College, 1939-41; Assistant 
Professor of Philosophy, Spring Hill College, 1948-; Chairman, 1950-. 

Samuel M. Betty, m.a., Assistant Professor of Economics. 
B.S.C, Spring Hill, 1939; M.A., Fordham University, 1947. 
Instructor in Economics, Spring Hill, 1946-48; Assistant Professor, 1948-. 

James Donald Blankenship, a.b., Instructor in English* 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1946. 

Instructor, Jesuit High, New Orleans, La., Summer, 1947; Assistant in English, Spring 
Hill College, 1947; Instructor, 1948-50. 

Joseph S. Bogue, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Gongaza University, 1925; A.M., 1926; Ph.D., Gregorian University, Rome, 1937. 
Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1926-28; Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1928-29; 
Professor, Spring Hill College, 1937-. 

Louis J. Boudousquie, m.s., Registrar, Associate Professor of Drawing and 
Mathematics. 

B.S., Spring Hill., 1917; M.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1936. 
Instructor, McGill Institute, Mobile, 1921-28; Registrar, Spring Hill, 1928-; Instructor 
1928-36; Associate Professor, 1936-. 

Theodore E. Brandon, m.a., Assistant Professor of Spanish. 
A.B., University of Alabama, 1938; M.A., 1939. 

Instructor in Romance Languages, University of Alabama, 1938-39; Instructor, Valley 
Vocational High School, 1939-40; Assistant Professor Clemson College, 1940-44; In- 
structor in Chemistry, University of Alabama Center, Mobile, Alabama, 1946-47; As- 
sistant Professor, Spring Hill College, 1949-. 

Francis X. Carberry, m.b.a., Associate Professor of Business Administration. 
B.S., Canisius College, 1925; M.B.A., Harvard University, 1928. 

Instructor, Buffalo Collegiate Center, 1933-36; Assistant Professor, Alabama Polytechnic 
Institute, 1936-42; National War Labor Board, 1943-45; Associate Professor, Georgia 
Institute of Technology, 1946-49; Associate Professor, Spring Hill College, 1940-. 

O. L. Chason, b.s., m.d., d.p.h., Special Lecturer in Sociology. 

B.S., University of Alabama, 1923; M.D., Tulane, 1925; D.P.H., Harvard, 1934. City 
Health Officer, Mobile, 1934. 

Arthur A. Colkin, s.j., a.b., Assistant Professor of History. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1935. 
Instructor in History, Spring Hill College, 1937-41; Assistant Professor of History 1946-. 

* Resigned, January 3, 1950. 

Bulletin of Information Page Five 



Daniel M. Cronin, s.j., a.m., Professor of Mathematics. 
A.B., St. Louis, 1900; A.M., 1901. 

Instructor, Spring Hill, 1901-03; Jesuit High School, New Orleans, La., 1903-06; Asso- 
ciate Professor, Chairman of Department of Mathematics, Spring Hill, 1913-35; Spring 
Hill, 1939-45. Professor, 1946-. 

John A. Cronin, s.j., m.a., Professor of Economics, Chairman of the De- 
partment. 

B.S.C., Spring Hill, 1929; M.A., St. Louis University, 1937. 
Professor of Economics, Spring Hill, 1937-38, 1943-. Chairman of the Department, 1943-. 

John Vincent Deignan, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Chemistry, Chairman of the 
Department. 

A.B., A.B., National University, Dublin, 1907; A.M., Woodstock College, 1917; Ph.D., 
Fordham University, 1929. 
Instructor in Chemistry, Spring Hill, 1917-22; Professor and Chairman, 1929-. 

Louis J. Eisele, s.j., m.s., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

A.B., St. Louis University, 1935; M.S., 1940. 

Teaching Fellow, St. Louis University, 1939-40; Instructor in Physics and Mathematics, 

Spring Hill College, 1940-41; Assistant Professor of Physics, 1946-. 

Joseph B. Franckhauser, s.j., a.m., Professor Emeritus of German. 

A.B., Woodstock College, 1900; A.M., 1901. 

Professor, Loyola University of the South, 1912-13; President, St. John's College, Shreve- 
port, La., 1927-30; Professor of German, Spring Hill College, 1936-48; Professor 
Emeritus, 1948. 

William C. Gardiner, a.b., Instructor of Physical Education and Coach. 
A.B., Georgetown University, 1943. 

Athletic Instructor, Washington, D. C, Recreation Department, 1942; Athletic In- 
structor, U. S. Army, 1943-46; Athletic Instructor and Coach, Spring Hill, 1946-. 

John A. Gasson, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 

A.B., Boston College, 1927; A.M., 1928; Ph.D., Gregorian University, Rome, 1931; 
S.T.L., Weston College, 1934. 

Instructor in History, Latin and Greek, Spring Hill, 1928-30; Professor of Philosophy 
and Psychology, Spring Hill, 1937-. 

Charles C. Goetz, s.j., s.t.l., Assistant Professor of Religion. 
B.S., Spring Hill College, 1938; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1947. 
Instructor in Chemistry, Spring Hill College, 1946-47; Assistant Professor of Religion, 
1948-. 

Kermit Hart, m.s., (bus. ad.) c.p.a., Special Lecturer in Accounting. 

B.S. (Bus. Ad.), University of Florida, 1927; M.S. (Bus. Ad.), University of Alabama, 
1940; C.P.A. (Alabama). 

Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1928-37; Assistant Professor, 1937-41; Associate Pro- 
fessor, 1941-46; Special Lecturer, 1946-. 

John J. Holden, m.ed., Instructor in History. 

B.S., Ithaca College, 1933; M.Ed., Rutgers University, 1946. 

Educational Adviser, Civilian Conservation Corps, 1934-38; Instructor, Middleboro Pub- 
lic Schools, 1939-42; Ordinance Department, War Department, 1942-46; Instructor in 
History, Spring Hill, 1947-. 

John A. Hutchins, s.j., a.m., Professor of French. 

A.B., Woodstock College, 1911; A.M., 1912. 

Instructor, St. Boniface College, Winnipeg, Canada, 1913-16; Jesuit High School, 
1921-22; Spring Hill High School, 1924-27; Professor of French, Spring Hill Col- 
lege, 1927-. 

Page Six Spring Hill College 



James V. Irby, b.s., Instructor in Speech. 
B.S., Spring Hill, 1942. 

Instructor, Army Air Forces, Army Ground Forces, Army Service Forces, 1943-46; In- 
structor, Spring Hill, 1946-. 

Francis L. Janssen, s.j., m.a., Professor of Language and Philosophy, Chair- 
man of the Department of Languages. 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1921; M.A., 1922. 

Professor of Languages, Religion, Philosophy, Spring Hill, 1932-37, 1942-43; Assistant 
Dean, Loyola University, New Orleans, 1937-42; Principal, St. John's High, Shreve- 
port, 1943-46; Professor of Languages, Religion, and Philosophy, Chairman of the De- 
partment of Languages, Spring Hill, 1947-. 

Joseph N. Langan, Special Lecturer in Political Science. 

Member, Alabama State Bar, 1936-; State Representative (Alabama), 1939-43; Grad- 
uate, Command and General Staff College, U.S.A., 1943; Alabama State Senator, 1947-; 
Mobile County Commissioner, 1949-50; Member, Alabama State Board of Education, 
1949-; Special lecturer in Political Science, Spring Hill College, 1949-. 

Everett H. Larguier, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Mathematics and Chairman 
of the Department of Mathematics and Physics. 

A.B., St. Louis University, 1934; M.S., 1936; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1947. 
Teaching Fellow, St. Louis University, 1934-35; Professor of Mathematics and Physics, 
Spring Hill, 1937-38; Assistant, Department of Mathematics, St. Louis University, 
1939-42; Visiting Lecturer in Mathematics, Loyola University, New Orleans, Summer, 
1942; Professor of Mathematics and Chairman of the Department of Mathematics and 
Physics, Spring Hill College, 1947-. 

Warren J. Martin, s.j., a.m., Special Instructor in Spanish. 
A.B. Gonzaga University, 1925; A.M., 1926. 

Instructor, Jesuit High School, Tampa, 1934-44; St. John's, Shreveport, 1944-45; Special 
Instructor, Spring Hill, 1945-. 

Frederick French McCaffrey, s.j., m.a., Instructor in English. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1947; M.A., Fordham University, 1950. 
Instructor in English, Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

James E. Moore, a.b., ll.b., Special Lecturer in Business Law. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1939; LL.B., University of Alabama, 1948. 
Special Lecturer in Business Law, Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

John F. Moore, s.j., b.s., Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. 

B.S., Spring Hill College, 1946. 

Instructor, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1947-48; Assistant, Spring Hill College, 

1948-49; Instructor, 1949. 

John Moreau, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Philosophy. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1926; A.M., 1927; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1934; 
Ph.D., Gregorian University, 1938; Mag. Agg., 1938. 
Professor of Philosophy, Spring Hill, 1938-. 

Thomas F. Mulcrone, s.j., m.s., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
B.S., Spring Hill College, 1939; M.S., Catholic University, 1942. 

Instructor in Mathematics, Spring Hill College, 1940-41; 1942-43; Assistant in Mathe- 
matics, St. Louis University, 1944-46; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Spring Hill 
College, 1948-. 

John H. Mullahy, s.j., m.s., Assistant Professor of Biology.* 

A.B., St. Louis University, 1937; M.S., Fordham University, 1942; S.T.L., St, Louis 

University, 1947. 

Instructor in Biology, Spring Hill, 1939-41; Assistant Professor of Biology, Spring 

Hill, 1947 -. 
* Absent on leave. 

Bulletin of Information Page Seven 



Malcolm Patrick Mullen, s.j., ph.d., Associate Professor of Philosophy. 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1928; A.M., 1929; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1936; Ph.D., 
Gregorian University, 1932. 

Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1929-32; Jesuit High School, New Orleans, Sum- 
mers 1930-32; Associate Professor, Loyola University, New Orleans, 1937-38; Assistant 
Professor, Spring Hill College, 1939-49; Associate Professor, 1949. 

Raymond Jerome Mullin, s.j., a.m., Assistant Professor of Philosophy and 
Religion. 

LL.B., Brooklyn Law School (St. Lawrence University), 1911; LL.M., 1912; A.B. Gon- 
zaga University, 1929; A.M., 1930; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1935 
Instructor in Languages, Loyola University, 1929-30; Assistant Professor of Religion, 
Philosophy and Sociology, 1940-46; Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion, 
Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

J. Franklin Murray, s.j., a.m., Assistant Professor of English. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1937; A.M., 1942; S.T.L., 1947. 
Instructor in English, Spring Hill College, 1939-40; 1941-42; Assistant Professor, 1946-. 

Joseph Otto Muscat, m.d., Associate Professor of Biology (Part Time). 

M.D., St. Louis University, 1931. 

Paul A. Napolitano, b.s.c, Instructor in Physical Education and Assistant 
Athletic Coach. 
B.S.C, Spring Hill College, 1948. 
Instructor of Physical Education and Assistant Coach, Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

John J. O'Keefe, s.j., a.m., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1935; A.M., 1939. 

Instructor, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1939-39; 1944-46; Instructor, Spring Hill 
College, 1946-49; Assistant Professor, 1949-. 

Eugene T. Regal, a.m., Assistant Professor of Biology. 
A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1933; A.M., 1934. 

Instructor in Biology, Marquette University, 1935-36; Professor of Science, St. Francis 
Seminary, Milwaukee, 1936-39; Instructor in Biology and Director of Intramural Ath- 
letics and Student Organizations, Milwaukee Public School System, 1939-45; Education 
Director in charge of Visual Aid and Athletic Programs for Wisconsin Coca-Cola Co., 
1945-47; Assistant Professor of Biology, Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

Hilton L. Rivet, s.j., a.m., Instructor in Sociology. 

A.B., Spring Hill College, 1947; A.M., St. Louis University, 1949. 

Instructor, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, Summer, 1948; Instructor, Spring Hill 

College, 1949-. 

Andrew Cannon Smith, s.j., ph.d., Dean, Professor of English, Chairman of 
the Department. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1923; A.M., Catholic University, 1930; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago, 1934. 

Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1923-24; Assistant Professor of English, Loyola Uni- 
versity of the South, 1931-32; Dean and Professor of English, Spring Hill, 1934-; 
Chairman of the Department, 1936-. 

Thomas A. Steely, s.j., a.b., Instructor in English. 

A.B., Spring Hill College, 1938; Graduate studies in St. Louis University School of 

Social Work. 

Assistant in Sociology and German, Spring Hill College, 1948-49; Instructor, 1949-. 

Edmund B. Sullivan, m.s., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
B.S. in Chemistry, Holy Cross College, 1932; M.S. in Chemistry, 1934. 
Instructor, Spring Hill, 1936-41; Assistant Professor, 1941-. 

Page Eight Spring Hill College 



John A. Sweeney, s.j., a.b., Assistant Professor of Religion and Sociology, 
Chairman of the Department of Religion. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1936. 
Instructor, Spring Hill, 1938-41; Assistant Professor and Student Counsellor, 1947-. 

Franklyn H. Sweet, m.s., c.p.a., Professor of Accounting. 
B.S., University of Alabama, 1938; M.S., 1949; C.P.A. (Alabama). 
Assistant Professor of Accounting, University of Alabama, 1946-48; Professor of Ac- 
counting, Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

Henry Francis Tiblier, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Philosophy. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1927; A.M., 1928; Ph.D., Gregorian University, 1942. 
Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1926-31; Associate Professor of Philosophy, Loyola 
University of the South, 1935-36; Associate Professor of Philosophy, Spring Hill Col- 
lege, 1937-48; Chairman of the Department, 1947-50; Professor, 1948-50. 

Edwin McKeon Trigg, b.s., Instructor in Chemistry. 
B.S., Spring Hill, 1941. 

Chemist, E. I. DuPont deNemours & Co., 1941-46; Research Assistant, University of 
Chicago, 1944, on assignment from E. I. DuPont de Nemours & Co.; Instructor, Spring 
Hill College, 1946-. 

John T. Walsh, s.j., m.a., Assistant Professor of English. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1939; M.A., Fordham University, 1942. 
Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1941-43; Associate Professor, 1948-. 

Joseph Michael Paul Walsh, s.j., m.a., Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
and Dean of Men. 

B.S.C., Spring Hill College, 1932; M.A., Gonzaga University, 1938. 
Assistant Principal, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1940-41; Assistant Professor of 
Philosophy, Spring Hill College, 1946-; Dean of Men, 1948-. 

Scott Youree Watson, s.j., ph.d., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1937; Ph.L., Gregorian University, 1947; Ph.D., 1948. 
Instructor, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1939-41; Instructor, St. Charles College, 
Summers 1940 and 1941; Instructor, Spring Hill College, Summer 1945; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Philosophy, Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

Patrick Henry Yancey, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Biology, Chairman of the 
Department. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1918; A.M., 1919; Ph.D., St. Louis University, 1931. 
Instructor in Biology, Spring Hill, 1919-23; St. Louis University, 1930-31; Professor of 
Biology, Chairman of the Department, 193 1-. 



Bulletin of Information Page Nine 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 
(1949-1950) 

Admission and Degrees: 

Mr. Boudousquie, Chairman, Frs. Deignan, Janssen, Murray and Mr. 
Sweet. 

Curriculum: 

The chairmen of the various departments: Fr. Smith (English), Chair- 
man, Fr. Benedetto (Philosophy), Fr. J. Cronin (Commerce), Fr. Deignan 
(Chemistry), Fr. Gasson (History and Social Sciences), Fr. Janssen (Lan- 
guages), Fr. Larguier (Mathematics and Physics), Fr. Sweeney (Religion), 
and Fr. Yancey (Biology). 

Faculty Ran\ and Tenure: 

Fr. Yancey, Chairman, Frs. Bogue, D. Cronin, Franckhauser, Larguier, 
and Mr. Boudousquie. 

Library: 

Miss Jaubert, Chairman, Frs. Gasson, Larguier, Watson, and Mr. Betty. 

Student Welfare: 

Fr. Sweeney, Chairman, Frs. Hutchins, O'Keefe, Joseph Walsh and Messrs. 
Steely and Sullivan. 

Discipline: 

Fr. Joseph Walsh, Chairman, Frs. Bogue, Goetz, Smith, and Tonsmeire. 

Athletics: 

Fr. John Walsh, Chairman, Frs. Colkin, Martin, Messrs. Gardiner and 
Napolitano. 

Publications: 

Fr. Goetz, Chairman, Frs. Murray, Yancey, Messrs. McCaffrey and 
Worsham. 

Student Grants-in-Aid: 

Fr. Smith, Chairman, Fr. J. Cronin, Fr. Deignan, Fr. John Walsh. 

Veterans' Affairs: 

Mr. Tyrrell, Chairman, Fr. Mullin, Messrs. Allen, Boudousquie and Irby. 

Public Occasions: 

Mr. Regal, Chairman, Frs. Eisele, Murray, Messrs. Holden, Moore and 1 
Rivet. 

Recommendations to Medical and Dental Schools: 

Fr. Smith, Chairman, Frs. Deignan, Larguier, Yancey, Messrs. Regal 
and Trigg. 

Page Ten Spring Hill College 




Spring Hill College Chapel 






MOBILE 
HALL 



YENNI 
HALL 



THOMAS 

BYRNE 

MEMORIAL 

LIBRARY 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

AND 

REGULATIONS 




! 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 

The first Bishop of Mobile, the Right Reverend Michael Portier, 
D.D., laid the cornerstone of the first building of Spring Hill Col- 
lege on July 4, 1830. It stood on the site of the present Administra- 
tion Building and was opened for classes in November, 1831. Five 
years later, the Governor of Alabama signed the legislative bill 
which chartered the Bishop's seminary-college and gave it "full 
power to grant or confer such degree or degrees in the arts and 
[sciences, or in any art or science ... as are usually granted or con- 
ferred by other seminaries of learning in the United States." This 
Ipower was used in the following year, 1837, when four graduates 
Breceived their degrees. Spring Hill thus takes its places among the 
(three oldest colleges in the South, while of Jesuit Boarding Colleges, 
Hit is the oldest after Georgetown. 

As the years went on and the college enrollment rose from thirty 
to more than a hundred, the Bishop found it more and more dif- 
ficult to provide from the limited personnel of his missionary clergy 
the necessary minimum of priest-teachers and administrators. The 
first two Presidents of Spring Hill were called away to be Bishops, 
one to Dubuque (Bishop Loras), the other to Vincennes (Bishop 
Bazin), and the third, Father Mauvernay died after a very brief 
term of office. Reluctantly, Bishop Portier was compelled to trans- 
fer his college to a newly arrived French Congregation, the Fathers 
of Mercy. With little or no experience in teaching, these zealous 
missionaries found the direction of Spring Hill a thankless task 
and gave it up after two years. A similar experiment with the 
Eudists succeeded no better, and in 1845 the College suspended 
operations, pending some new arrangement. 

In this crisis the Lyons province of the Society of Jesus was per- 
suaded to take over Spring Hill, and the new regime was inaugu- 
rated with Father Francis Gautrelet, S.J., as President, in Septem- 
ber, 1847. Since that time through many vicissitudes, the Jesuit 
Fathers have directed the policies of the college and endeavored 
to make a center of liberal culture. During the Civil War, studies 

Bulletin of Information Page Thirteen 



continued without interruption, but a costly fire in 1869 destroyed 
the main building and required the removal of students and fac- 
ulty to St. Charles College, Grand Coteau, Louisiana. Through the 
generous aid of many friends, particularly Bishop Quinlan, "the 
second founder," a new building rose on the site of the old, and 
the new Spring Hill opened its doors. 

Until 1921 the High School and College Departments were not 
perfectly separate in organization and faculty, but after that date 
a more clear-cut division was noticeable. Within a few years new| 
buildings arose on the western side of the campus, and thither the] 
college removed for classes and recreation. With the close of the 
term in 1935, the High School department was discontinued, anc 
the whole plant thus given over to the needs of the college* 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The College Campus occupies some 700 acres of the elevatioi 
which gives its name to this residential suburb of Mobile. Th< 
city and bay are both visible from the hill and easily accessibl< 
either by bus line or by the famous Old Shell Road, which passe 
the college gates. The village of Spring Hill has a post office, bu 
no railroad station. The prospective student or visitor will there 
fore come first to Mobile, a beautiful city of the Old South, nov 
nationally famous for its Azalea Trail. 

Spring Hill is on the Azalea Trail, just six miles from the cente 
of the city. The natural beauty of its well-chosen site, adorned witl 
an almost endless variety of trees and shrubs and flowers, its lake 
its shaded avenues, and the striking setting of its athletic fields anc 
its buildings make the campus one of the most attractive in th; 
United States. 

Owing to its altitude and the invigorating influence of it 
resinous pines upon the surrounding atmosphere, Spring Hill hold 
one of the best records for health in the country. The air is pur 
and bracing, and even in the hottest summer months, the tempera 
ture, thanks to the nearby Gulf, is usually several degrees lowe 
than in the neighboring city. The mildness of the climate all th 
year round makes it possible for outdoor sports to continue with 
out interruption. 

The Administration Building stands on the site of the firs 
building which Bishop Portier erected for his pioneer college. Th 

*Those interested in the full story of the first hundred years of Spring Hill should rea 
Kenny, M., S.J., The Torch on the Hill (Centenary History of Spring Hill College), Sprin 
Hill College, Spring Hill, Ala. 

Page Fourteen Spring Hill Colleg 



present plant, erected partly in 1869, partly in 1909, to replace the 
lamage caused by historic fires, is a brick structure several hundred 
: eet in length and three stories high. Covered Spanish colonnades 
oin it to the Dining Hall on the west, the Infirmary on the east, 
ind the Chapel on the north. The building itself is occupied by 
:he Faculty and the administrative offices. Class rooms are also 
ocated in this building. 

The Infirmary Building is the only building in present use 
vhich antedates the fire of 1869. On the first floor is located the 
pharmacy under the charge of a registered nurse; and the rooms 
)n the second floor are equipped to take care of all ordinary cases 
)f illness. 

The Refectory Building across the quadrangle from the In- 
: irmary contains the dining halls for faculty and students. The 
: aculty hall upstairs is brightened by the painting which Napoleon's 
incle, Cardinal Fesch, presented to his friend Bishop Portier for 
lis new college. The students' dining hall is on the lower floor. 

The College Chapel, dedicated to the Patron of the College, 
K Joseph, was built in 1910. It is modified Gothic in style, and 
)eautifully appointed within. 

Yenni Hall, erected and named in memory of Father Dominic 
fenni, S.J., Professor of Latin and Greek at Spring Hill for over 
:ifty years, and author of Yenni's Latin and Greek Grammars, is 
entirely devoted to Science. Here are installed on different floors 
he Physics, Chemistry, and Biology lecture rooms and laboratories, 
and the Seismographic Station. 

The Thomas Byrne Memorial Library, the newest building 
m the campus is the gift of Mrs. Byrne in memory of her husband 
and son. It was completed in 1930. It has room for 150,000 volumes, 
rhe general reading room is large enough to accommodate 100 
students at one time. There are besides smaller rooms for research 
and conference, and one large lecture room. A special section of 
:he building contains the Lavretta Library, donated by Mr. L. C. 
Lavretta, a Mobile Alumnus. 

The College Inn is a recreation center midway between the 
?olf course and Mobile Hall. Recently redecorated, it contains a 
lounge, a little theatre, dance hall and fraternity meeting rooms. 

The Gymnasium is located in a building just west of the Dining 
Hall. It contains a basketball court, locker rooms, and showers. 

Quinlan Hall is the name given to the long corridor of rooms, 
built over the Gymnasium-Auditorium Building in 1916, and 

Bulletin of Information p a g e Fifteen 



named in honor of Spring Hill's second founder, Bishop Quinlan. 
There are 40 living rooms in the building, each equipped with 
clothes-press and lavatory. 

Mobile Hall is the largest dormitory building. Dedicated 
November 6, 1927, it gave a new center to the college campus. 
Built on modern lines and with ample provision for the future 
growth of the college, it has space and equipment for housing over 
100 students. Temporarily some of the rooms on the first floor 
have been arranged as offices and classrooms. The living rooms 
in this building are bright and airy, and provided with every 
modern convenience. 

Cummings Hall and Kenny Hall, named respectively for a 
deceased President and Dean of the College, Father Edward 
Cummings, and for its historian and long-time Philosophy Profes- 
sor, the late Father Michael Kenny, are temporary dormitory build- 
ings erected with the help of the FWA to house Veterans. 

Other campus buildings include the Sodality Chapel, a campus 
landmark recently renovated, an Animal House for biology de- 
partment material and the Chemistry Annex containing laboratory 
space for freshman chemistry classes. 



Page Sixteen Spring Hill College 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND 
EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

The College requires for admission the satisfactory completion 
of a four year course in a secondary school approved by a recog- 
nized accrediting agency. All candidates for admission to Fresh- 
man year must present sixteen units in acceptable subjects. A unit 
represents a year's study in any subject, constituting approximately 
a quarter of a full year's work. This definition of a unit takes the 
four-year high school as a basis and assumes that the length of the 
school year is from thirty-six to forty weeks, that a period is from 
forty-five to sixty minutes in length, and that the study is pursued 
for four or five periods a week. Candidates are admitted either by 
certificate or by examination. 

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE 

Admission unconditionally by certificate is granted applicants from ap- 
proved secondary schools provided: (1) their 16 high school units include 
12 of strictly academic nature (i.e., English, Mathematics, Languages, His- 
tory, Natural Science, Social Science), and specifically such as correlate in 
the opinion of the Board of Admission with the course which the candidates 
intend to pursue; (2) that the student's rank in his high school class be bet- 
ter than that of the lowest quartile, or alternatively, that more than half of 
his grades be better than D; and (3) that there is satisfactory evidence of 
personal character and other qualities deemed requisite by the College for 
desirable students. 

Students from countries where the English language is not the vernacular 
are required to have a sufficient mastery of the English language to enable 
them to follow class lectures without difficulty. No special classes in English 
will be provided by the college for these students. 

Blank forms of entrance certificates which are to be used in every case 
may be had on application to the Registrar. Certificates must be made out 
and signed by the Principal, or other recognized officer of the secondary 
school, and sent by him directly to the Registrar. Such certificates upon sub- 
mission become the property of the College, whether the applicant is ac- 
cepted or not. 

ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 

Applicants, who are not entitled to admission by certificate, may with 
permission of the Board of Admissions take examinations for admission. 
These examinations are held during the first week of September. Appli- 

Bulletin of Information Page Seventeen 



cants who are rejected for reasons of character or academic ranking are not 
eligible for these examinations. 

ADMISSION ON PROBATION 

Upon special recommendation of their Principal, graduates of four year 
non-accredited high schools will be admitted without examination on pro- 
bation for their first semester, provided they fully satisfy the quantitative 
and qualitative entrance requirements enumerated above. Admission on pro- 
bation, but with a limited schedule, may also be granted by the Board of 
Admissions to students who though otherwise acceptable are ranked in the 
lowest quartile of their high school class, provided there is additional evi- 
dence of seriousness of purpose and reasonable prospect of success in college. 
Students on probation are liable to dismissal for poor scholarship at the end 
of the semester unless they pass every subject in their limited schedule. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Students applying for admission from other institutions of collegiate rank 
will be given advanced standing provided the courses taken are considered 
comparable to those given at Spring Hill. In the evaluation of previous work, 
no credit will be accepted for work done with less than a C average for the 
year. The transfer student must also present an honorable dismissal from 
the last institution attended. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Mature and earnest students who either are lacking in the required units 
or wish to pursue particular studies without reference to graduation, may 
be admitted by the permission of the Dean to such courses of their own 
choice as they seem qualified to take. The work done by these students can- 
not be counted later on toward a degree unless all entrance requirements 
have been satisfied. 

PART-TIME COURSES 

For the convenience of teachers and others who have satisfied the require- 
ments of college entrance, the College offers special courses in college sub- 
jects leading to the various bachelor degrees. Students who have not satisfied 
the requirements for college entrance also may enroll in these courses for the 
cultural value and general information to be gained thereby, but credit will 
not be granted until the proper entrance credentials have been approved and 
filed. 

This part-time work is offered in Summer Session, in a Saturday morn- 
ing course, and in Special Courses for Nurses. 

Summer Session 

The Summer Session runs for six weeks for a maximum of eight semester 
hours. The bulletin of this session is published in April. The dates of sum- 
mer session are announced in the calendar. 

Saturday Courses 

On Saturdays from 8:30 to 12:30 courses are given on the college campus 
during a full year of thirty-four weeks. The length of the periods is so ar- 

Page Eighteen Spring Hill College 



[ranged that students may gain three semester hours credit in a subject by 
i taking it through the year, or by taking a double period through the semester. 
!The maximum number of credits is nine for the year's work. The tuition is 
$7.50 per semester hour. 

\Nurses Courses 

For the student nurses of the Nursing Schools of City Hospital and Provi- 
dence Hospital of Mobile, special courses are offered in Biology, Chemistry, 
I Philosophy, Psychology, Religion and Sociology. By special arrangement 
J these courses are also open to other qualified students on a part-time basis. 

The Nurses' courses begin the fourth Monday in September and con- 
tinue through the year till the third Saturday in May, with the usual holidays 
j indicated in the College Calendar. 

STATEMENT OF THE OBJECTIVES 

j Ultimate Objectives 

As a Jesuit Liberal Art College, Spring Hill has the same pri- 
mary purpose as the Catholic educational system taken in its en- 
tirety. This is best expressed in the words of Pope Pius XI: "The 
proper and immediate end of Christian education is to cooperate 
with divine grace in forming the true and perfect Christian, that 
is, to form Christ Himself in those regenerated by baptism . . . The 
true Christian, product of Christian education, is the supernatural 
man who thinks, judges and acts constantly and consistently in 
accordance with right reason, illuminated by the supernatural light 
of the example and teaching of Christ; in other words, to use the 
current term, the true and finished men of character." 

Immediate Objectives 

It is in terms of this end that the Jesuit College of Liberal Arts 
conceives its special function in contemporary American life. Obvi- 
ously, then, it will not neglect the field of religion. Instruction in 
Catholic faith and morals will always be a part of its task. But it 
is not the whole. The Jesuit college by its traditions can never be 
content with simply presenting Catholicism as a creed, a code or 
a cult. It must strive to communicate the riches of Catholicism as 
a culture, thus giving the modern man a coign of vantage whence 
to view with understanding not merely the facts in the natural 
order, but those in the supernatural order also, those facts which 
give meaning and coherence to the whole life. 

Jesuit education regards the college of liberal arts as the heart 
of its system. It is through the instrumentality of such colleges 
that Catholic leaders will be formed, men and women who have 
been trained spiritually and intellectually in the Catholic sense, who 

Bulletin of Information Page Nineteen 



have intelligent and appreciative contact with Catholicism as 
culture, who through their general education in the college of arts 
have so developed their powers of mind and heart and will that! 
they can take an active part in the service of Church and society. 

The Jesuit college in its teaching aims at reaching the whole 
man, his intellect, his will, his emotions, his senses, his imagination, 
his aesthetic sensibilities, his memory, and his powers of expression. 
It seeks to lift up man's whole being to that broad, spiritual out- 
look on life whereby he not only understands and appreciates the 
fact that our entire social heritage is bound up with the Truth, 
Goodness and Beauty of God as seen in Revelation, Nature, Art, 
and Language, but is likewise willing and ready to become identi- 
fied with those activities, individual as well as collective, that make 
for the sanctification of the individual and the betterment of society. 

The Jesuit college strives to provide a broad foundation in gen- 
eral education, upon which advanced study in a special field may 
be built. 

Vocational Objectives 

In addition to these objectives held in common with all Jesuit colleges, 
Spring Hill aims by proper direction in the choice of elective studies to pre- 
pare her graduates for successful work in professional schools, in business, 
and in teaching. 

Specific Objectives of the Various Academic Degrees 

The objective of the Arts (A.B.) degree or curriculum is to give a bal- 
anced cultural education as a foundation for full living. This objective is 
to be attained through the humanistic and philosophic disciplines, supple- 
mented by training in scientific and mathematical thinking, the entire cur- 
riculum to be integrated by acquaintance with the social and religious factors 
that have entered into the making of Western civilization, and that con- 
tribute to the solution of contemporary problems. 

The objective of the Science (B.S.) degree or curriculum is to give by I 
means of natural sciences, or social sciences, a thorough training in the I 
scientific method as a basis of sound scientific thinking, balanced by cul- I 
tural training in language, literature and history, and correlated as intimately 
as possible with scholastic philosophy. 

The objective of the Commerce (B.S.C.) degree or curriculum is to give 
a systematic and balanced training in the problems and principles of business 
administration with specialization in one of three fields related to the world 
of commerce, supplemented by cultural work in language, history and scho- 
lastic philosophy. 

Objectives of V re -professional Curricula 

The Pre-Legal Course prepares the student for admission to various 
recognized Law Schools of the United States by two or three years of de- 
gree work, with emphasis on the social sciences. 

Page Twenty Spring Hill College 



The Pre-Medical Course enables the student to fulfill the entrance re- 
quirements of the various Class A Medical Schools taking three years of 
degree work with emphasis on the pre-medical sciences. 

The Pre-Dental Course in three years qualifies the student for admis- 
sion to various Class A Dental Schools. The curriculum is much the same 
as that of the pre-medical course. 

The Engineering Course supplies the mathematical deficiencies of the 
beginning engineering student and gives him at least the first year of basic 
engineering, common to all engineering curricula. To finish his course the 
student must transfer after one or two years to a fully accredited Engineer- 
ing School. 

The Nursing Course, while preparing the nursing students of the City 
Hospital and Providence Hospital of Mobile for their diplomas as Registered 
Nurses, gives them two years of accredited courses towards a Bachelors' de- 
gree in Nursing Education. 



Bulletin of Information Page Twenty-one 



THE GOVERNMENT AND THE WELFARE 
OF THE STUDENTS 



THE DISCIPLINE 

Spring Hill is committed to the belief that a system of education which 
discounts the formation of character is pernicious. For this reason oppor- 
tunity is given to learn the important lesson of obedience to salutary laws 
and restraints. Everywhere necessary for ordered living, discipline is impera- 
tive when restless youths are forming a community of their own, as they 
do in a boarding school. Whatever the age of the students, and their opinion 
of their abilities to shape their own lives, the authorities of the school feel 
for their charges the responsibility of a parent. Rules are therefore made 
governing the out-of-class life of the students, particularly their social activities 
and absences from the campus. These rules and the sanctions for their ob- 
servance are made known to the student from the beginning. Their enforce- 
ment, while considerate, is unflinchingly firm. Campus discipline is ad- 
ministered through the office of the Dean of Men. 

DISCIPLINARY PENALTIES 

Naturally, in addition to minor breaches of college discipline, there occur 
at times serious offenses which require drastic punishment, even suspension 
or dismissal from college. Such are: serious insubordination, repeated vio- 
lation of regulations, neglect of studies, possession or use of intoxicating 
liquors; habitual use of obscene or profane language, and in general any 
serious forms of immorality. In cases of the suspension or dismissal of a 
student for such reason the tuition fee is not refunded. 

Without committing any overt act of the kind described in the preceding 
paragraph, a student may at times by constant and ill-founded criticism, or 
an habitual attitude of opposition to the college government become an un- 
desirable member of the community. For such cases the college reserves the 
right to request any student to withdraw from school, with, however, an 
honorable dismissal, and the refund of such fees as may be refundable by the 
treasurer's regulations. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE OF STUDENTS 

The College is a Catholic institution intended primarily for Catholic 
students, but it does not exclude those of other religious beliefs who may 
wish to take advantage of its system of education. As a rule about 25 per 
cent of the whole student body, and about 5 per cent of the boarding stu- 
dents are non-Catholics. Special courses in religion are provided for non- 
Catholics to replace the required courses in Catholic religion. They are per- 
mitted and encouraged to attend their own religious obligations on Sunday. 
By exception they are expected and required to assist as a part of the student 
body at the collegiate chapel services listed in the annual College Calendar. 

Page Twenty-two Spring Hill College 



The Catholic students are given every opportunity to learn their religion 
' in theory and in practice. A graded course in Religion is offered, running 
through four years, and all Catholics are obliged to register for these courses. 
I Credits are given for the courses and required for graduation. 

Week-day Mass is required of all Catholic boarding students. Frequent, 
! even daily, Communion is encouraged and quite generally practiced. Special 
; devotions are practiced towards the Sacred Heart on the first Friday of the 
I month, and towards the Blessed Virgin Mary during the months of October 
I and May. A wonderful occasion of grace for many is the annual three-day 
Retreat given in the first semester and obligatory on all Catholic students, 
boarders and day scholars alike. The day scholars will be charged a nomi- 
nal fee for board and lodging during the three days of the exercises. 

One of the Fathers on the Faculty is appointed as counsellor or advisor 
of the students. His principal duty is to direct the spiritual activities of the 
college and the various religious societies and sodalities, in regard to which 
he exercises much the same supervision as the Dean of Men exercises in his 
department. 

veteran's education 

The College is approved for the education of Veterans under the GI 
Bill of Rights and Public Law 16. Accordingly it is the policy of the school 
to afford these men every opportunity for study compatible with their edu- 
cational background and the scope of the institution. 

Full credit will be given for courses and training completed in military 
service. In this matter the college will be guided by the American Council 
on Education in its publication entitled, Guide to the Evaluation of Educa- 
tional Experiences in the Armed Services. 

Special guidance is provided for the veterans and special facilities are 
offered for their admission by examination when their high school course 
was interrupted by war service. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

As college education is accomplished not only during the hours of class 
but also in no small degree during the students' interchange of ideas at other 
periods, the College heartily encourages all student organizations which help 
to develop in the student initiative, self-reliance and leadership in organized 
religious and social movements, qualities which are expected of college men 
generally. 

PRINCIPAL STUDENT GROUPS 

Student Council 

This is the co-ordinating group for all the campus organizations. Repre- 
sentation on the council is enjoyed by all the recognized clubs. The President 
of the Council is elected by the student-body and represents them in all 
petitions to the faculty. 

Sodality of the Immaculate Conception 

The Sodality began its work at Spring Hill in 1847 and has never ceased 
to represent the loyalty of the students to the Mother of God. Regular meet- 
ings are held, and various works of zeal and charity undertaken under the 

Bulletin of Information Page Twenty-three 



sponsorship of this organization. Closely connected with the Sodality are the 
Apostleship of Prayer, and the St. John Berchmans Sanctuary Society, the one | 
fostering the ideal of reparation, and the other the liturgical movement. 

Alpha Sigma Nu 

This is the Jesuit Honor Fraternity open to those holding highest academic 
rank in the Senior class. 

Portier Debating Academy 

The purpose of this organization, named for the founder of the college, 
is to foster forensics. From its ranks the intercollegiate debating team is 
usually chosen. 

The Yenni Dramatic Society 

This society, an offshoot of the Portier in 1935, aims to develop a practical 
interest in the drama. 

Beta Beta Beta 

This national fraternity in biology has a very active chapter at Spring Hill. 
Meetings are held twice a month, with guest speakers a frequent attraction. 
The Mendelian is published monthly by the group. 

International Relations Club 

The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace approved in 1940 the; 
opening of this campus club at Spring Hill. The purpose of its monthly 
meetings is to enlighten student opinion on world affairs. A special library 
is maintained. 

Philomelic Academy 

This youngest organization on the Spring Hill campus is devoted to the 
study and appreciation of classical as well as modern music masters. Its meet- 
ings and auditions are open to the public. 

Publications 

In normal times the students publish, under faculty supervision, the fol- 
lowing publications: 

The Springhillian, the fortnightly newspaper of campus activities and 
opinions. 

The Spring Hill Quarterly, a literary magazine. 

The Spring Hill S Book, a Manual for Freshmen. 

Veterans Club 

This organization came into being in 1946 when the more than a hundred 
veterans of World War II studying at Spring Hill under the Gl Bill of Rights | 
decided to band together to promote their social and academic welfare. The 
group is independent, unaffiliated with any national organization. 

ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

In intercollegiate athletic competition, Spring Hill is a member of the 
newly-formed Gulf States Conference, composed of colleges in Louisiana, 
Mississippi and Alabama, and its athletic teams engage those of other col- 1 
leges in basketball, baseball, tennis and golf. 

Page Twenty -four Spring Hill College '■ 



Intramural sports play an adequate part in the extra-curricular life of 
the student body at Spring Hill. Facilities for various seasonal intramural 
sports are available on the campus. Conducted on an optional basis, the 
(teams represent various student groups in touch-football, basketball and soft- 
ball. Off-campus intramural athletics include among others, a bowling league. 
Trophies are provided for the winners in the various intramural sports. 

Tennis courts, an eighteen-hole golf course and a large spring-fed lake 
| are other facilities offered for student participation in athletic activity. 



Bulletin of Information Page Twenty-jive 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



SESSIONS 

The school year begins in the middle of September and ends in the be 
ginning of June. The year is divided into two semesters of sessions o 
eighteen weeks each. The first semester ends during the last week of Jan 
uary. The second begins immediately thereafter, without mid-year holidays 

ATTENDANCE 

Since the purpose of college education is not only to impart informatioi! 
and develop the mental faculties, but also, if not chiefly to train the studen 
in habits of punctuality and fidelity to duty, prompt attendance at all clas 
meetings is constantly stressed, and the co-operation of parents and guardian 
in this important matter is earnestly requested. The date of registration an< 
the limits of the various holiday periods are clearly stated in this catalogue 
and will be stricdy adhered to. 

Although for grave reasons the Dean may grant an excuse from class at 
tendance, the responsibility for seeing to it that unauthorized absences fron 
class meetings do not exceed the tolerated maximum rests directly on the in 
dividual student (the tolerated maximum equals the number of class meeting 
per week of the course). The penalty for excessive absence in any course 1 
automatic cancellation of the student's registration in that course, and accord 
ingly no credit will be given for the course. In special cases the delinquen 
may be reinstated by the Committee on Appeals upon written recommenda 
tion of his instructor. Absences immediately preceding and following holiday 
periods count triple. 

Failure in prompt attendance is regarded as a partial absence or tota 
absence, if in excess of ten minutes. Two partial absences will be equivalen 
to one absence. No absences from laboratory periods are excused and missec 
laboratory work must be done at the convenience of the instructor. Thest 
extra laboratory periods are subject to special fee (see Fees and Expenses). 



AMOUNT OF WORK 

The unit for computing the amount of a student's work is the semestei 
hour, which is defined as approximately one hour of class lecture, recitatior 
or demonstration per week for a semester. Two hours of preparation by the 
student for each class hour is presumed. Laboratory periods are double. Ir 
general, one semester hour represents for the average student ordinarily aboulj 
three hours of actual work each week throughout one semester, divided apj 
propriately between lecture or laboratory periods and out-of-class preparation! 
A normal student load is about seventeen hours per week and no candidate 
for a degree will be allowed to register for fewer than twelve hours; unusual 
programs need special approval of the Dean for completion of registration. 

Page Twenty-six Spring Hill College 



XAMINATIONS AND GRADES 

Final examinations are held in all courses at the end of each semester, 
tudent grades in various courses are determined by these examinations to- 
ether with all intra-semestral recitations, quizzes and tests. Missed exami- 
ations, with or without justifying excuse, must be taken eventually. 

The following system of grading is used. Each semester hour of credit 
; valued as follows: 

A excellent, with 3 quality points per hour of credit. 

B good, with 2 quality points per hour of credit. 

C fair, with 1 quality point per hour of credit. 

D deficient, but passed without quality points. 

E not passed, but entitled to re-examination for passing grade. 

F failed without right to re-examination. 

The student should note that the grade D, although passing, indicates 
nsatisfactory wor\. 

A grade of E may be incurred for deficiency in recitations, quizzes, exami- 
ations or other assigned work. Deficiency in examinations is removable by 
jpplementary examination, subject to fee payable in advance, to be admin- 
tered on dates set by the Dean; failing to register for these supplementary 
laminations upon official publication of schedule by the Dean's office the 
udent waives his right to re-examination. Successful completion of supple- 
lentary examination entitles the student to a grade of D only. Deficiency due 
) failure to complete assigned work may be removed by making up the re- 
uired work. This ordinarily entails a fine of one dollar and, where labora- 
)ry work is required, the additional fees for make-up laboratory periods. 

CADEMIC PROBATION AND SUSPENSION 

Failure to pass at least three courses in any semester renders a student 
able to dismissal for poor scholarship. Exception to this rule is made only 
Dr weighty reasons. 

Low grades and neglect of work within the semester render a student 
able to probation, including exclusion from extra-curricular activities; and 
ulure to improve will entail reduction of schedule with a permanent record 
f failure in the subject cancelled. 

A test in proficiency in English will be given all Sophomores. Should any 
rove unsatisfactory, they will be required to take a course in remedial Eng- 
sh. Passing this course by the beginning of their last semester is a condi- 
on of graduation. 

TUDENT RANKING 

Those students are ranked as Sophomores who have at least twenty-four 
redit hours and points and have completed the prescribed courses of Fresh- 
en year; Juniors, those who have fifty-six credits and points and have com- 
leted the prescribed courses of the Sophomore year; Seniors, those who have 
linety-two credit hours and points and have completed the prescribed courses 
f the Junior year. 

Ieports 

i At least four times a year, i.e., in November, January, April and July de- 

jiiled reports of scholarship and conduct are issued from the Dean's office. 

ulletin of Information Page Twenty-seven 



At other times also similar reports will be furnished to interested parents c 
guardians upon request. 

WITHDRAWAL 

Students who for any reason withdraw from college during the semest( 
must give previous notice to the Registrar. Failure to do this within reasoi 
able time will incur forfeiture of right to an honorable dismissal. 

TRANSCRIPT OF RECORD 

Students wishing transcript of records in order to transfer from this cc 
lege to another, or for any other purpose, should make early and seasonab 
application for the same. No statements will be made out during the bu; 
periods of examinations and registrations. The first transcript of record 
furnished free. For each additional copy there is a charge of one dollar. 






Page Twenty-eight Spring Hill Colki 



PROGRAMS OF CURRICULA 



Although there are students who, when they enter college, have not made 
up their minds with any degree of certainty as to the career that they in- 
tend to follow, this does not mean that even their program cannot be con- 
structive. In any instance the directing principle of a well-planned program 
of studies should not be chiefly vocational. A student who intends to study 
medicine will naturally see that he includes all those subjects which the medi- 
cal schools require for admission, but in addition he should not forget that 
a good doctor must also be a good human being and that he needs besides 
his specialized medical knowledge a wide range of interests and cultivated 
tastes. The best medical schools prefer candidates who have not had a nar- 
rowly specialized training in college. Similarly, a student who is planning 
I to go into law or engineering should not try to limit himself in college to 
I subjects which appear to be immediately contributory to legal or engineering 
| studies. A student, when making his choice of program, must realize that 
j presumably he has before himself a lifetime of necessary specialization, but 
! only three or four years of freedom in which to study the interrelation of 
j ideas and knowledge, to broaden his intellectual interest and human sympa- 
thies, to fit himself to take his part as an intelligent man in the social, eco- 
itiomic, political and religious order that lies ahead of him. 

The ideal college education should prepare a man to live — physically, men- 
tally and spiritually — up to his fullest capacity, to cooperate with and under- 
I stand other men while still preserving the integrity of his own individual 
character, to establish for himself the standards of thinking and conduct which 
shall give directions to all this activities, to see new possibilities in existing 
conditions of life and to adapt himself to other conditions in which he may 
find himself in the future. An education so conceived is what is called a 
liberal education as opposed to an education restricted to vocational training. 
In a liberal education mathematics and the sciences, literature and the other 
arts, history, philosophy and religion are studied as means to liberalizing the 
human spirit, to freeing a man from the narrowing restrictions of a single 
environment and the single age in which he lives. An adequate knowledge 
of the past is our only means of acquiring the necessary experience with 
which to meet the future. Such an education as is described here can pre- 
pare a man adequately for the privileges and the responsibilities of citizen- 
ship in the world of today. 

The programs of curricula listed below are designed to assist the student 
in the achievement of the goals outlined above. For convenience of reference 
these programs of curricula are listed in some detail. Numbers in parentheses 
indicate semester hours of credit required in various subjects. Special atten- 
tion is called to the following requirement, applicable in all instances where 
modern language study is part of the curriculum, either academic or pro- 

Bulletin of Information Page Twenty-nine 



fessional: Those who ta\e an Elementary Modern Language in Freshman 
year are obliged to continue the same language in Sophomore year; the de- 
gree requirement is successful passing of a reading test given after the Inter- 
mediate course. 

ACADEMIC CURRICULA 

Arts Course (A.B.) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Latin (4), Greek or Modern Language (3), English (3), Mathematics 
(3), Science (4), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Latin (4), Greek or Modern Language (3), Mathematics (3), Science 
(4), Religion (2), English (3). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Latin (4), Greek or Modern Language (3), English Literature (3) : 
Sociology (3), Logic (3), Speech (2), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Latin (4), Greek or Modern Language (3), English Literature (3) ; 
Sociology (3), Metaphysics (3), Art (2), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Psychology (3), History (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Elec- 
tives (9). 

Second semester: Theodicy (3), History (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Elec- 
tives (9). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Ethics (3), History of Philosophy (2), Religion (2), Major and Minor 
Electives (9). 

Second semester: Ethics (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Electives (9). 



Science Courses (B.S.) 

BIOLOGY 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: General Biology or Botany (4), Chemistry (4), French or German (3) ; 
English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: General Biology or Zoology (4), Chemistry (4), French or German 
(3), English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), English (3), Chemistry (4), French or German (3) : 
Logic (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Biology (4), English (3), Chemistry (4), French or German (3), 
Metaphysics (3), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Psychology (3), English (3), History (3), 
Religion (2), Physics (4). 

Second semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Theodicy (3), English (3), History (3), 
Religion (2), Physics (4). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Biology (6), Chemistry (4), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (2). 

Second semester: Biology (4), History and Philosophy of Biology (2), Ethics (3), 
Religion (2), Electives (4). 

Page Thirty Spring Hill College 



CHEMISTRY 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: General Inorganic Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), Mod- 
ern Language (3), Drawing (2), Religion (2). 

Second semester: General Inorganic Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), 
Modern Language (3), Drawing (2), Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Qualitative Analysis (4), Physics (4), Modern Language (3), Logic (3), 
History (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Quantitative Analysis (4), Physics (4), Modern Language (3), Meta- 
physics (3), History (3), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Organic Chemistry (4), Psychology (3), English (3), Religion (2), 
Mathematics (3). 

Second semester: Organic Chemistry (4), Theodicy (3), English (3), Religion (2), 
Mathematics (3). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Physical Chemistry (3), Quantitative Analysis (4) or Physiological 
Chemistry (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (6). 

Second semester: Physical Chemistry (3), Quantitative Analysis (4) or Physiological 
Chemistry (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (6). 

MATHEMATICS 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Mathematics (3), Chemistry (4), English (3), French or German (3), 
Religion (2). 

Second semester: Mathematics (3), Chemistry (4), English (3), French or German 
(3), Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Calculus I (3), General Physics (4), English (3), Logic (3), French 
or German (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Calculus II (3), General Physics (4), English (3), Metaphysics (3), 
French or German (3), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Mathematics (3), Psychology (3), Religion (2), History (3), Minor 
Electives (6). 

Second semester: Mathematics (3), Theodicy (3), Religion (2), History (3), Minor 
Electives (6). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Mathematics (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (9). 
Second semester: Mathematics (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (9). 

PHYSICS 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), French or German (3), 
Religion (2). 

Second semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), French or German (3), 
Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: General Physics (4), English (3), Calculus I (3), Logic (3), Religion 
(2), French or German (3). 

Bulletin of Information Page Thirty-one 



.: 



Second semester: General Physics (4), English (3), Calculus II (3), General Meta- 
physics (3), Religion (2), French or German (3). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Physics (6), Differential Equations (3), Psychology (3), History (3), 
Religion (2). 

Second semester: Physics (6), Theodicy (3), History (3), Religion (2), Elective 
(Mathematics suggested) (3). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Physics (4), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (8). 
Second semester: Physics (4), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (8). 

Social Science Course (B.S.) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Modern Language (3), Science or Mathematics (3-4), English (3), 
History (3), Sociology or Political Science (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Modern Language (3), Science or Mathematics (3-4), English (3), 
History (3), Sociology or Political Science (3), Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Modern Language (3), English (3), Logic (3), Economic (3), Soci- 
ology or Political Science (3), Public Speaking (2), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Modern Language (3), English (3), Metaphysics (3), Economics 
(3), Sociology or Political Science (3), Public Speaking (2), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Philosophy (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Electives (12). 
Second semester: Philosophy (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Electives (12). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Ethics (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Electives (9). 
Second semester: Ethics (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Electives (9). 

PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Commerce Courses (B.S.C.) 

Under a program of expansion, Spring Hill College has increased its course 
offerings in various fields of commerce. This program embraces an intensive 
training in Accounting, Banking and Finance, General Business, Industrial 
Management, and Merchandising as well as a complete training in Economics 
for students preparing for graduate work in that field. Pre-law students are 
offered a strong business program designed to meet law school requirements. 

The need of a broad foundation in liberal education, as well as general 
survey of the entire business field, is not overlooked in the planned specialized 
courses. All commerce students take a prescribed program of work in the 
freshman and sophomore years; specialization is begun in the junior year. 

As a complement to the campus instruction, the department, with the co- 
operation of Mobile business firms, conducts studies of on-the-ground business 
practices. These field trips are designed to bridge the gap between the class- 
room and the plant. 

The professional accounting program is planned to prepare the student 
for work in the executive and public accounting fields. It has been carefully 

Page Thirty-two Spring Hill College 



organized to fit the requirements for practical professional work and ultimate 
public certification. 

The Department of Commerce maintains an active employment service 
for its student personnel. Organized confidential records are prepared for 
students desiring aid and are available for examination by prospective em- 
ployers. 

In the choice of electives the student should consult his special advisor 
before registration in any semester. 

GENERAL PROGRAM FOR FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Algebra (3), Elementary Accounting (3), English Composition (3), 
Modern Language (3), History (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Trigonometry or Analytic Geometry (3), Elementary Accounting (3), 
English Composition (3), Modern Language (3), History (3), Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Intermediate Accounting (3), Economics (3), Business Law (3), Mod- 
ern Language (3), Logic (3), Religion (2), English Literature (3). 

Second semester: Intermediate Accounting (3), Economics (3), Business Law (3), 
Modern Language (3), Metaphysics (3), Religion (2), English Literature (3). 

ACCOUNTING 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Accounting Problems (3), Cost Accounting (3), Psychology (3), Public 
Speaking (2), Religion (2), Business Administration Electives (6). 

Second semester: Accounting Problems (3), Accounting Systems (3), Theodicy (3), 
Report Writing (2), Religion (2), Business Administration Electives (6). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Elementary Auditing (3), Income Tax Procedure (3), General Ethics 
(3), Business Administration or Economics Elective (6), Accounting Elective (2), Re- 
ligion (2). 

Second semester: Advanced Auditing (3), Income Tax Procedure (3), Special Ethics 
(3), Business Administration or Economics Elective (6), Accounting Elective (2), Re- 
ligon (2). 

BANKING AND FINANCE 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Money and Banking (3), Insurance (3), Marketing (3), Business 
Cycles (3), Religion (2), Public Speaking (2), Psychology (3). 

Second semester: Public Finance (3), Real Estate (3), Credit Management (3), Sta- 
tistics (3), Theodicy (3), Religion (2), Report Writing (2). 

| SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Bank Administration (3), Monetary Theory (3), Corporation Finance 
(3), Business Administration Elective (3), General Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Investments (3), International Trade (3), Business Administration 
Elective (6), Special Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

ECONOMICS 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Psychology (3), Religion (2), Economic Analysis (3), Money and Bank- 
ing (3), Minor Elective (3), Sociology (3), Public Speaking (2). 

Second semester: Theodicy (3), Religion (2), Economic Analysis (3), Statistics (3), 
Minor Elective (3), Sociology (3), Report Writing (2). 

Bulletin of Information Page Thirty-three 



SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: General Ethics (3), Religion (2), Major Elective (3), Minor Electiv 
<3), Cultural Elective (3). 

Second semester: Special Ethics (3), Religion (2), Major Elective (3), Minor Electiv 
(3), Cultural Elective (3). 

GENERAL BUSINESS 
JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Money and Banking (3), Marketing (3), Business Administration Elec 
tive (3), Accounting or Economics Elective (3), Psychology (3), Religion (2), Publi 
Speaking (2). 

Second semester: Industrial Management (3), Credit Management (3), Business Ad 
ministration Elective (3), Accounting or Economics Elective (3), Theodicy (3), Religioi 
(2), Report Writing (2). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Corporation Finance (3), Business Cycles (3), Business Administratioi 
Elective (6), General Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Statistics (3), Investments (3), Business Administration Elective (6) 
Special Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Labor Problems (3), Time and Motion Study (3), Corporation Financ* 
(3), Marketing (3), Psychology (3), Religion (2), Public Speaking (2). 

Second semester: Personnel Management (3), Manufacturing Industries (3), Statistic 
(3), Wholesaling (3), Theodicy (3), Religion (2), Report Writing (2). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Industrial Management Problems (3), Cost Accounting (3), Money anc 
Banking (3), Business Administration Elective (3), General Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Industrial Management Problems (3), Advanced Cost Accounting j 
(3), Purchasing (3), Business Administrative Elective (3), Special Ethics (3), Religion (2), 

MERCHANDISING 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Marketing (3), Money and Banking (3), Corporation Finance (3). 
Labor Problems (3), Psychology (3), Religion (2), Public Speaking (2). 

Second semester: Purchasing (3), Credit Management (3), Industrial Management (3). 
International Trade (3), Theodicy (3), Religion (2), Report Writing (2). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Retailing Problems (3), Advertising (3), Business Cycles (3), Business 
Administration Elective (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Salesmanship (3), Wholesaling (3), Statistics (3), Ethics (3), Re- 
ligion (2), Business Administration Elective (3). 

COMPOSITE DEPARTMENTAL MAJOR FOR PRE-LEGAL TRAINING 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Money and Banking (3), Corporation Finance (3), Elective (3), Soci- 
ology (3), Psychology (3), Religion (2), Speech (2). 

Second semester: Marketing (3), Public Finance (3), Elective (3), Sociology (3), Theo- 
dicy (3), Religion (2), Speech (2). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Labor Problems (3), Income Tax Procedure (3), Political Science (3), 
Advanced Speech (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Labor Law (3), Income Tax Procedure (3), Political Science (3), 
Advanced Speech (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

Page Thirty-four Spring Hill College 



Engineering Course 

While Spring Hill College does not have the facilities for a complete 
engineering course in any of its various branches, yet it can and does give 
some of the basic, fundamental instruction common to all branches of en- 
gineering. Attention is called particularly to the necessity of thorough prepa- 
ration in English and Mathematics. It is presupposed that a candidate's train- 
ing in English will enable him to express his ideas clearly either orally or in 
writing. In Mathematics, emphasis should be on a thorough mastery of funda- 
mental principles, operations and definitions rather than on covering a wide 
range of subjects. The student whose high school training is deficient in 
these subjects should consider seriously the possibility that his vocational 
choice of engineering is ill-advised; such procedure can forestall future dis- 
appointments. The first two years of engineering training in all branches is 
nearly uniform and can be partially secured by the following program. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), Engineering Drawing 
(2), Religion (2), General Geology (2). 

Second semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), Engineering Drawing 
(2), Religion (2), Engineering Problems (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Calculus I (3), English (3), General Physics (4), Mechanics (2), De- 
scriptive Geometry (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Calculus II (3), English (3), General Physics (4), Mechanics (2), 
Religion (2), Surveying (3). 

Pre-Legal Course 

Most law schools admit all applicants who have successfully completed 
I two years of a regular college course for a minimum of 60 credit hours. A 
j few with higher standards require an A.B. degree. 

The following is a possible two-year program for future law students. 
For the student who looks forward to a possible law career in Industrial re- 
lations, Labor law, Tax law, Corporation law and the like, the special com- 
merce department program for pre-legal training, which leads to a B.S. de- 
gree in commerce as a preliminary to entrance into law school, should be of 
definite interest. It is listed earlier in this bulletin. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: History (3), Political Science (3), Language (3), Science or Mathe- 
matics (4), English (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: History (3), Political Science (3), Language (3), Science or Mathe- 
matics (4), English (3), Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: History (3), Language (3), Logic (3), Sociology (3), English (3), 
Public Speaking (2), Religion (2). 

Second semester: History (3), Language (3), Philosophy (3), Sociology (3), English 
(3), Public Speaking (2), Religion (2). 

Pre-Dental Course 

Although the minimum requirement for admission to recognized dental 
schools is two years of college work with an emphasis on science courses, in 

Bulletin of Information Page Thirty-jive 



practice a student must have completed three or four years of college work 
before he can reasonably expect admission. The following program will assist 
the student in attaining his professional objective. 

FIRST YEAR 

First semester: General Biology or Botany (4), General Chemistry (4), French or Ger- 
man (3), English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: General Biology or Zoology (4), General Chemistry (4), French or 
German (3), English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

SECOND YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), English (3), French or German (3), Logic 
(3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), English (3), French or German (3), | 
Philosophy (3), Religion (2). 

THIRD YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Psychology (3), History (3), Religion (2), 
Physics (4). 

Second semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Theodicy (3), History (3), Religion (2), 
Physics (4). 

Pre-Medical Course 

The minimum requirement for admission to recognized medical schools, 
in addition to the high school requirement, is ninety semester hours of col- 
legiate work extending through three years of at least thirty-two weeks each, 
in a college approved by the Council of Medical Education of the American 
Medical Association. 

The subjects prescribed for the minimum of three years of college work 
are as follows: 

Chemistry (12), Physics (8), Biology (8), English composition and literature (6), 
Other non-science subjects (12), French or German (8-12). 

Subjects strongly urged: 

Advanced botany or comparative anatomy (3-6), Psychology (3-6), Algebra and trigo- 
nometry (3-6), Additional courses in chemistry (3-6). 

Other suggested electives: 

English (additional), economics, history, sociology, political science, logic, Latin, Greek, 
drawing. 

The above represents the minimum requirements. It is to serve these that 
the Spring Hill pre-medical program, as outlined below, is designed. The 
ideal preparation for the future doctor and now required by some medical 
schools is the four-year course leading to a B.S., or preferably, an A.B. degree. 
The student in this case, however, should make sure to include in his elective 
studies the courses listed above. 

FIRST YEAR 

First semester: General Biology or Botany (4), General Chemistry (4), French or Ger- 
man (3), English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: General Biology or Zoology (4), General Chemistry (4), French or 
German (3), English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

SECOND YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), English (3), French or German (3), Logic 
(3), Religion (2). 

Page Thirty-six Spring Hill College 



Second semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), English (3), French or German (3), 
Philosophy (3), Religion (2). 

THIRD YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Psychology (3), History (3), Religion (2), 
5 hysics (4). 

Second semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Theodicy (3), History (3), Religion (2), 
'hysics (4). 

Teacher Training 

Students who wish to prepare for teaching careers in high school may 
fulfill all requirements for necessary teaching certificates while working on 
:heir degree programs. The requirements for such certification in the State 
)f Alabama are outlined below. 

:lass b secondary temporary professional certificate 

A Class B Secondary Temporary Professional Certificate may be issued 
o a person who presents credentials showing: 

1. That he has graduated with a bachelor's or master's degree from a standard in- 
titution and has met requirements as prescribed by the State Board of Education for the 
xaining of secondary teachers (Spring Hill is such an institution); 

2. That he has earned prescribed semester hours credits as follows: Education (18), 
ncluding Psychology (4-8), Principles and Philosophy (2-6), Electives in the fields of 
secondary Education (4-12), English (12), Social Studies (12), including courses, each 
)f which has a credit value from 2 to 4 hours in 2 of the following fields: History, Eco- 
lomics, Political Science, Sociology, or Geography; Science (6); 

3. That he has to his credit an academic Major of (18) hours in an approved subject; 

4. That he has to his credit an academic minor of (12) hours in an approved subject. 

A Class B Secondary Temporary Professional Certificate is valid for a 
period of three years and is the authority of the holder to teach the subjects 
jtiamed in its face and other high school subjects as conditions may require. 
This certificate cannot be continued or reinstated. 

If the holder of this certificate expects to continue to teach after it expires, 
tie must meet requirements for a Class B Secondary Professional Certificate 
jor a Class A Secondary Professional Certificate. 

JCLASS B SECONDARY PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE 

To the requirements for the Class B Secondary Temporary Professional 
Certificate the following must be added to obtain a Class B Secondary Pro- 
fessional Certificate: 

1. Education (6), including Psychology (3), Principles and Philosophy (2), Materials 
jand Methods of Teaching Major or Minor Subject in High School (2-6), Directed Teach- 
ing of Major or Minor Subject in High School (2-8), Electives in the field of Secondary 
'Education (0-10); 

2. The academic major in approved subject must be 24 semester hours; 

3. The academic minor in approved subject must be 18 semester hours. 

A Class B Secondary Professional Certificate is a conditional permanent 
jcertificate which is valid in periods of eight years and is the authority of the 
jholder to teach the subjects named in its fact and other high school subjects 
jas conditions may require. 

\Bulletin of Information Page Thirty-seven 



NATIONAL TEACHER EXAMINATION 

Students enrolled in the Department of Education must take the Natiom 
Teacher Examination sometime during their course, and make the results c 
these examinations a part of their permanent record. The National Teache 
Examinations are administered annually at Spring Hill College. The speck 
student rate given by the National Office will be charged to the student. Thi 
rate for the Common and Optional Examinations is $4.50. 

OBSERVATION AND PRACTICE TEACHING 

In order to supplement its instruction in educational principles, aim; 
methods, curricula and procedure, and to cultivate professional skill in teact 
ing, Spring Hill College has secured the cooperation of the Jesuit High Schoc 
of New Orleans. Through the courtesy of its administrators and teacher: 
this school thus becomes the proving ground for the professional students c 
the Department of Education, who have free access to its classrooms for ot 
servation of the methods practiced therein and for supervised practice teact 
ing. Co-operating with the State Department of Education, Spring Hill Col 
lege requires that its candidates for degrees with a major in education presen 
a minimum of 4 semester hours in observation and practice teaching with 
minimum of 40 full periods of class teaching and 15 hours of observation. 



Page Thirty-eight Spring Hill Collegt 



FEES AND EXPENSES 



BASIC FEES: 

, For all students: 

jj (tuition: 

is, (Regular session per semester $125.00 

clSummer session per credit hour 7.50 

I (ACTIVITY FEE: 

i iRegular session per semester 25.00 

r Summer session 5.00 

For boarding students only: 

board: 

J Regular session per semester 168.00 

I Summer session 60.00 

(ROOM AND LAUNDRY: 

Regular session per semester 75.00 

I Summer session 25.00 

i MEDICAL FEE: 

j Regular session per semester 5.00 

| Summer session 5.00 

For new students only: 

Matriculation Fee 10.00 

Room Deposit (Boarders only) 10.00 

SPECIAL FEES: (payable each semester where required) 

Science Laboratory (for each course) 7.50 

Laboratory Breakage Deposit (refundable) 5.00 

I Accounting Laboratory 5.00 

| Surveying 5.00 

1 C. P. A. Review Course 40.00 

MISCELLANEOUS FEES: 

| Conditional Examination (day assigned) 2.00 

I Conditional Examination (special day) 5.00 

i Special Tutoring (per hour) 3.00 

: Make-up Laboratory Period (each) 2.00 



Bulletin of Information Page Thirty-nine 



Duplicate Transcript of Credit 1.0C 

Fee for Late Registration 5.0C 

Fee for Change of Registration 2.0C 

Golf Membership Fee (per semester) 12.0C 

Graduation Fee (payable final year only) 15.0CJ 

National Teacher Examination 4.5C 

MUSIC FEES: (per semester) 

Lessons one hour weekly 45.0(j 

Use of piano one hour daily 5.0( 

Use of organ one hour daily 25.0(1 

Activities Fee includes use of the library, entertainments and lectures pro- 
vided by the College authorities, student publications, athletic contests, botr. 
intercollegiate and intra-mural and courses in physical education. 

Rooms are shared by two occupants. They are equipped with lavatorj 
and toilet and are supplied with hot and cold water and all necessary heav) 
furnishings. Students supply their own toilet linen, rugs and whatever decora- 
tions are appropriate. 

Medical Fee takes care of medical attention by the Staff Physician anc 
ordinary nursing in the College Infirmary not in excess of ten days. 

Matriculation Fee, as indicated above, is payable on first entrance only. 

Room Deposit, which must accompany each application for entrance ii 
not applied to room rent but is retained to cover any damage beyond reason- 
able wear which may be done to the room or its furnishings while occupied 
by the students. The balance is returned to the parents when the student 
withdraws from the College. In case a student fails to occupy a room after 
reservation, the deposit will not be returned, unless notice of withdrawal is 
received one month before scheduled occupancy of room. 

REGULATIONS OF THE TREASURER 

All checks should be made payable to Spring Hill College and addressed 
directly to the Treasurer's Office. Because of Mobile bank regulations, it is: 
requested that Cashier's Chec\s or Exchange Checks be sent, rather than 
Personal Checks. A charge of ten cents per fifty dollars will be added to 
personal checks. Those desiring to send Postal Money Orders should have 
them drawn on the Mobile Post Office. Payments made from countries out- ; 
side continental United States should be made payable in New York or New 
Orleans exchange. 

All minor expenses, for books, stationery, etc., are on a strictly cash basis.! 
Money for the personal accounts should be sent directly to the student, who 
alone will be responsible to the parents or guardians for an itemized state- 
ment of expenditures. This money may be deposited for safe keeping with 
the Treasurer, but in this case parents must state in writing a definite amount 
for weekly withdrawals by the student. No advance of money will ever be 
made at any time for any purpose whatever. In case of emergency, students 
should have money wired to them. 

If a student is withdrawn before the end of the semester, no deductions 
will be made. Should, however, a student leave on account of prolonged ill- 

Page Forty Spring Hill College 



I ness, or be dismissed honorably, a deduction for board and room rental, but 
I not for tuition and fees, will be made for the remainder of the semester, be- 
| ginning with the first of the following month. The date on which notice is 
I received by the Treasurer from the Registrar's Office is considered the date 
I of withdrawal. 

No student may have an honorable dismissal nor will he be given credit 
I for his studies or be admitted to the examination in January or May until all 
! indebtedness to the College has been settled. 

The College will not be responsible for books, clothing, jewelry or any 
| other articles possessed by the student while in school or left by him at his 
I departure. 

Refunds, when due, are made only to parents or guardians of the stu- 
; dent, unless the College be instructed in writing by parent or guardian to 
J make the refund to the student. 

PLAN OF PAYMENTS 

Although the general regulation calls for payment in two installments, 
i the College offers the following alternative: Payment may be made in monthly 
i installments in advance. An extra charge of $5.00 will be added, should par- 
ents or guardians elect to pay on the monthly plan. This charge will be made 
and is payable with the first monthly installment. 

Special arrangements for any other alternative plan of payments or pos- 
sible reduction in the case of brothers, must be made before the opening 
classes with the Treasurer. 



Bulletin of Information Page Forty-one 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT AID 



Realizing the importance of substantial aid in the encourage- 
ment of deserving students, far-seeing friends of the College have 
from time to time set aside funds for the establishment of scholar- 
ships. A perpetual scholarship is established by the gift of funds 
whose interest will yield a sum sufficient to pay tuition at least in 
part. To cover the entire yearly cost of tuition an endowment of 
$5,000 is required. An annual scholarship is provided by the yearly 
donation of $250. 

Scholarships 

The Little Flower Scholarship. This scholarship is worth $200 annually. 

The Saint Ignatius Scholarship. 

The Charles P. Miller Gold Star Scholarship, founded by his modier 
in memory of this member of the class of 1938, who gave his life for his 
country in World War II. 

The Bishop Toolen Scholarships, donated by the Most Reverend T. J. 
Toolen, D.D., Bishop of Mobile, carry remittance of tuition fees. One was 
awarded for the period beginning with the fall semester 1949 and another 
will be awarded for the fall of 1950. 

The McGill Scholarship (formerly the Spring Hill High School Scholar- 
ship) is awarded annually to the graduate of McGill Institute, Mobile, who 
wins the highest honors of his class. It carries remittance of tuition fees for 
the student's course. 

The Christian Brothers Scholarship is awarded under the same condi- 
tions as the preceding one to the honor graduate of Christian Brothers' Col- 
lege, Memphis, Tennessee. 

The Jesuit High School Scholarships are granted to the honor graduate 
of each of the High Schools of the New Orleans Province of the Society of 
Jesus, namely, Jesuit High School of New Orleans, Jesuit High School of 
Dallas, Jesuit High School of Tampa, St. John's High School of Shreveport. 

Finally, a restricted number of Spring Hill College Scholarships will 
be granted by the college annually. Applications for these scholarships must 
be made to the Dean before August 1st. These scholarships are awarded on 
the basis of proven need and high academic standing. 

Self Aid 

A certain number of student assistantships and clerical positions are open 
annually to deserving students. Students wishing to profit by such financial 
aid should apply to the Dean before May 15th. 

Page Forty-two Spring Hill College 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

The conditions to be satisfied in order that a baccalaureate de- 
cree be earned may be classified under the following headings. 

COURSE REQUIREMENT 

The required subjects for various degrees are as follows: 

described for the A.B. Degree 

Latin (16), Greek or Modern Language (6-12), English (12) Science (8), Mathe- 
natics (6), History (6), Religion (16), Logic (3), Metaphysics (6), Psychology (3), Ethics 
[6), History of Philosophy (2), Sociology (6), Public Speaking (2). 

described for the B.S. Degree (Natural Sciences) 

Chemistry (8), Physics (8), Mathematics (6-16), English (12), Modern Language 
6-12), History (6), Logic (3), Metaphysics (6), Ethics (6), Psychology (3), Religion (16). 

described for the B.S. Degree (Social Sciences) 

Modern Language (6-12), English (12), Science or Mathematics (6), History (6), 
olitical Science (6), Economics (6), Religion (16), Logic (3), Metaphysics (6), Ethics 
[6), Sociology (6), Public Speaking (2), Psychology (3). 

described for the B.S.C. Degree (Commerce) 

Mathematics (6), Business Law (6), English (12), History (6), Language (6-12), 
ublic Speaking (2), Religion (16), Logic (3), Metaphysics (6), Psychology (3), Ethics (6). 

I. QUANTITATIVE REQUIREMENT 

In order to qualify for a baccalaureate degree the student must present, 
n addition to the courses listed in the preceding section appropriate to the 
legree he seeks, a program of studies consisting of not less than 132 semester 
jiours of work. 

|$. QUALITATIVE REQUIREMENT 

A candidate for a degree must obtain not only the number of credits re- 
quired, but his work must reach a certain standard of excellence. In addition 
|:o the 132 hours credit necessary for graduation, each student must earn at 
I east 132 quality points, or an average mark in all subjects of C or better. 
So student will be advanced to candidacy for any collegiate degree whose 
pedit points do not equal his semester hours at the beginning of his last 
;;emester. 

L CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENT 

There must be completed a major sequence of at least twenty-four hours 
In some subject (or at the discretion of the professor concerned and with the 
approval of the Dean, in some closely related group of subjects) and a minor 
[sequence of at least eighteen hours. A major may be changed only by the 
Consent of the Dean and the heads of the departments concerned, and such 
change will be permitted only upon the distinct understanding that all the 

Bulletin of Information Page Forty-three 



courses prescribed in the major finally chosen shall be completed before 
graduation. 

*>. COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

At the end of his senior year the candidate for a degree must pass a com-- 
prehensive examination on the various courses offered as a major. Candi- 
dates in the honors program (see below) must also present an acceptable 
thesis for the approval of the Dean. 

«6. RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT 

The senior year (or 24 of the last 30 semester hours of work) must be 
made at Spring Hill College. 

*]. GRADUATION FEE 

A graduation fee of fifteen dollars is payable in advance and a settlement 
of all indebtedness to the College must be made. 

All applicants for a degree must file their applications and pre- 
sent their credits and the evidence of having met all requirement! 
listed above on or before the first of April preceding commence- 
ment. 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

Special requirements for honors at graduation are given undei 
the following headings. 

1. GRADUATION HONORS 

The honors at graduation to be inscribed on the diplomas, read at com 
mencement and published in the lists of graduates are granted on the basii 
of quality points in their ratio to the total number of credit hours carriec 
and are awarded according to the following scale: maxima cum laude for 
quality quotient of 2.9; magna cum laude for a quality quotient of 2.7; curr, 
laude for a quality quotient of 2.5. 

2. HONORS PROGRAM 

To encourage the better qualified students to independent work and tc 
assist them in integrating their knowledge in a particular field of concen 
tration, a special honors program was inaugurated with the Junior Class 01 
1940. Eligible upon approval of the Dean are those students who have i 
quality quotient of 2.0 or better at the end of their Sophomore year. Upor 
registering for the honors program, these students will be assigned a tutoi 
who will arrange for each one a special program in his chosen field, includ 
ing at least 18 semester hours of upper division work in one department anc 
15 more in related fields. A great part of this work will be done by read- 
ing and conference, while class attendance for the honor student is at thd 
discretion of the tutor. At the end of his course, the honor students must! 
pass a special comprehensive examination, both oral and written on his specia. 
field in its entirety. Upon the results will depend his graduation with first 
honors, with second honors, or merely with passing grade. 

Page Forty-four Spring Hill Collegt 



PRIZES AND TROPHIES 



To encourage the students of Spring Hill College in the de- 
elopment of initiative, self-reliance and leadership in various phases 
»f college life the following prizes and trophies are awarded in 
ecognition of outstanding achievement. In most instances the 
.wards are made annually. 

[he Joseph Block Memorial Medal for Music has been founded by the 
hildren of a former Professor of Music at the college; viz., Edward Block 
i New York; Alexander Block, Mrs. Bettie Haas, Mrs. Emma Eichold and 
Ars. Francis B. Simon of Mobile. 

This medal was awarded to R. T. Gibbons Robichaux. 

The Bishop O'Sullivan Memorial Medal is awarded for excellence in Chris- 
ian Doctrine and Ecclesiastical History. 

This medal was awarded to Ernest E. Phillips. 

The Hutchison Medal, founded by Miller Reese Hutchison is awarded to 
nhe writer of the best thesis in Philosophy. 
This medal was not awarded. 

Phe Merilh Medal for the best English essay was founded by Edmund H. 
j/ferilh, B.S., 1917. 

This medal was not awarded. 

The Walsh Memorial Medal was founded in memory of William A. Walsh, 
A..B., 1908, for excellence in Oratory. 

This medal was awarded to Ernest Ferlita. 

||rHE O'Callaghan Medal, donated by Rev. J. McDermott, in memory of 
jlev. C. T. O'Callaghan, D.D., for the best paper in Latin. 
This medal was not awarded. 

Ihe Mastin Medal, founded by the former physician of the college, Dr. Wil- 
jiam Mastin, is awarded for the best paper in General Chemistry. 
This medal was awarded to Richard Joseph Gaul. 

[he Stewart Medal is donated annually by Dr. Dudley M. Stewart, B.S., 
1923, for the best paper in Biology. 

This medal was awarded to Paul Riise. 

bulletin of Information Page Forty-jive 



The Houssiere Medal, founded by Charles, Ernest and Jules Houssiere for 
excellence in mathemathics. 

This medal was awarded to Stanley R. Nolan. 

The Faulk Medal, donated by Ward C. Faulk for the highest honors of the 
Bachelor of Science in Commerce degree. 

This medal was awarded to Henry Edward Reimer, Jr. 

The Lange Medal, founded by Mrs. Louis A. Lange of New Orleans, ij 
awarded for excellence in Accounting. 

This medal was awarded to Milton Oliver Booth. 

The Allen Medal, founded by the Most Reverend Edward P. Allen, formei 
Bishop of Mobile, is awarded by the votes of the students to the one excelling 
in deportment. 

This medal was awarded to Harold Earl Johnson. 

The Toolen Medal, founded by the Most Reverend Thomas J. Toolen, D.D. 
Bishop of Mobile, to be awarded to the graduate with the highest scholastic 
average for his four years of work. 

This medal was awarded to Albert John Boudreaux. 

The Matt Rice Service Cup, founded by the Omicron Sigma Fraternity ii 
memory of Matthew P. Rice, A.B., 1919, a founder of the fraternity, i 
awarded annually to the student, who during the year has rendered the great 
est service to the college. 

This cup was awarded to Donald A. Towner. 

The Freshman Cup, founded in 1938 at the silver jubilee reunion of the clas, 
of 1913 by the following members of the class: Father John J. Druhan, S.J4 
President of the College, Dr. William Barker, Lee A. Plauche, Frank Pro 
haska, and William B. Slattery, is awarded annually to the Freshman show 
ing greatest promise of future leadership. 

This cup was awarded to Daniel B. Nolan. 

Prize of $25 Security Bond, donated by Mobile Academy of Science to out 
standing Science Student at Spring Hill College. 
This bond was awarded to Richard Joseph Gaul. 

The Father Yancey Medal, donated by Russell E. Morris, Jr., B.S., 1945 
is awarded for the best piece of original undergraduate research in biology. 
This medal was awarded to John J. Doolan. 

The Economics Medal is donated annually by Mrs. Ellen M. Betty for th< 
best paper in Economics. 

This medal was awarded to William B. Carpenter. 

The Distinguished Student in Accountancy Award of the Alabama Societj I 
of Certified Public Accountants. 

This award will be made for the first time at the 1950 Commencement 

Page Forty-six Spring Hill Colleg 



GIFTS AND BEQUESTS 



As a private institution of higher learning, Spring Hill College 
must look to its friends and benefactors and to all whose bounty 
is on occasion devoted to the cause of education for the generous 
contributions which will enable the College to carry on its work 
of education, to provide an increase in the aid to deserving students, 
and to extend its contribution to the spread of knowledge and truth. 
Gifts to the College may take the form of funds for the establish- 
ment of scholarships or professorships, of additions to the material 
equipment or library collections, of contributions to the general en- 
dowment fund, or may be undesignated. Those desiring to make 
a bequest to Spring Hill in their wills may be helped by the fol- 
lowing suggested form: 

LEGAL FORM FOR BEQUEST 

/ give (devise) and bequeath to Spring Hill College, an institution incor- 
porated under the laws of the State of Alabama, and located at Spring Hill, 

Mobile County, Alabama, its successors forever, the sum of 

Dollars (or otherwise describe the gift) for its general corporate purpose 
(or name a particular corporate purpose). 



"Bulletin of Information Page Forty-seven 



CREDO OF SPRING HILL 



The hope of the future is to mold the mind of youth. Foreign dictator 
ships sought to perpetuate their shackles through "youth movements. 1 
American youth is exposed to these poisons which can destroy our hard 
won liberties. 

Spring Hill College refuses to subscribe to the doctrine that "academi 
freedom" may be used as a pretext to teach systems which destroy all free 
dom. We proudly boast that it has always taught and always will teacl 
the following creed: 

We believe in God 

We believe in the personal dignity of man 

We believe that man has certain rights which come from God 
and not from the State 

We therefore are opposed to all forms of dictatorships which 
hold that the "total man" (totalitarianism) belongs to the State 

We believe in the sanctity of the home — the basic unit of Society 

We believe in the natural right of private property, but like- 
wise that private property has its social obligations 

We believe that Labor has not only rights but obligations 

We believe that Capital has not only rights but obligations 

We are vigorously opposed to all forms of racism — persecution 
or in tolerance because of race 

We believe that liberty is a sacred thing, but that law, which 
regulates liberty, is a sacred obligation 

We believe in inculcating all the essential liberties of American 
Democracy and ta\e open and fran\ issue with all brands of 
spurious "democracy." - 

We believe, briefly, in the teachings of Christ, who held that morality 
must regulate the personal, family, economic, political and international lift 
of men if civilization is to endure. 

Page Forty-eight Spring Hill Colleg 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

AND 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS 




DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



INTRODUCTORY NOTES 

The courses of instruction listed below are numbered according to a uni- 
fied plan. Lower division courses (usually taken by freshmen and sopho- 
mores) are numbered 1 to 99. Within the lower division numbers, the num- 
bers 30 to 99 frequently indicate that the course is reserved for sophomores. 
Upper division courses (usually taken by juniors and seniors and supposing 
previous preparation) are numbered from 100 to 199. Courses given in the 
first semester are usually designated by an odd number and those given in 
the second semester by an even number. Double numbers (e.g. 141-142) fre- 
quently indicate that the first semester course is prerequisite for the second 
semester course and that both must be satisfactorily completed to obtain credit 
for either course. In most departments the courses are grouped into decades 
according to sequence, content, or some other plan of subdivision. 

KEY SYMBOL 

The following is a list of the key letters used to indicate the different 
departments of instruction: 

Accounting Ac French JFr Physical Education Pe 

Biology Bl German Gr Physics Ph 

Business Administration Ac Gree\ G\ Political Science Po 

Chemistry Ch History Hs Psychology Ps 

Economics Ec Latin Lt Religion Rl 

Education Ed Mathematics Mt Sociology So 

Engineering . Eg Music Mu Spanish Sp 

English JEn Philosophy Pi Speech Ex 



Of the courses listed below under the various department head- 
ings as many as may seem necessary will be given each term; the 
College, however, reserves the right to ma\e such changes or vari- 
ations as circumstances require, including restriction of the num- 
ber of students to be admitted to any course. 

BIOLOGY (Bl) 

To major in biology a student must include in his program Bl 191 and at least sixteen 
j additional upper division hours in biology, as approved by the chairman of the department, 
i Students who plan to major in biology should confer with the department chairman as soon 
as possible after this decision has been reached. To pursue advanced upper-division courses 
I in biology it is necessary for the student to undergo successfully a qualifying examination; 
i this examination is administered annually and usually should be taken by the student dur- 
: ing his sophomore year. The date of the examination is announced each year by the De- 
I partment of Biology. 

i 

I Bulletin of Information Page Fifty-one 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. General Biology 
An elementary course consisting of a study of protoplasm and the cell, the taxonomy of the 
plant and the animal kingdoms, the morphology and physiology of plant and animal types, 
and of the principal facts of heredity and evolution. Lectures two hours per week; labora- 
tory four hours per week. Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

3. Genetics 

A Survey course of the facts and theories of heredity and variation. Prerequisite: Biology 1 

or equivalent. Lectures two hours per week. One semester. Two hours credit. 



4. Genetics Laboratory 
A practical course in methods of genetics investigation. Prerequisite: Accompanied by Biol- 
ogy 3. Two hours credit. 

5-6. Anatomy and Physiology 

A course intended primarily for nurses. It consists of lectures and demonstrations in gross 
human anatomy and physiology and of lectures and laboratory work in histology and em- 
bryology. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory two hours per week. Two semesters. 
Six hours credit. 

7. General Bacteriology 

This course is designed to make the student nurse more familiar with the existence, char- 
acteristics and activities of micro-organisms, especially as they are related to nursing, with 
emphasis on cultural methods of studying bacteria; microscopic study of pathogenic bacteria 
and their relation to disease; history of microbiology; classification of bacteria; the mechan- 
ism of infection; immunity and immune substances. One semester. Three hours credit. 

8. Botany 

An elementary study of the plant kingdom. May be substituted for Biology 1. Lectures two 
hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

9. Zoology 

An elementary study of the animal kingdom. May be substituted for Bl 21 Lectures two 
hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

11. Introductory Biology 

A general introduction to the science of life designed especially for those who wish only a 
cultural background in biology. The course can not be substituted for Bl 1-2 by majors 
in biology or by pre-medical and pre-dental students. Lectures and demonstrations three 
hours per week. Three hours credit. 

31. Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates 

A comparative study of type forms with special reference to analogy and homology. Pre- 
requisite: Bl 1-2. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. Given 
every year. One semester. Four hours credit. 

32. Mammalian Anatomy 

The anatomy of the cat compared with the human. Prerequisite: Bl 31 . Lectures two hours 
per week; laboratory four hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

121. Histology 

A study of cells, tissues and organ structure. Prerequisite: Bl 1-2, 31, 32. Lectures two 
hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

122. Vertebrate Embryology 

A study of gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation and later development of 
typical vertebrate forms. Prerequisite: Bl 1-2, 31, 32. Lectures two hours per week; labora- 
tory four hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

Page Fifty-two Spring Hill College 






125. Special Problems in Biology 

Presentation of problems in biology which have philosophical significance. May be substi- 
tuted for Bl 191. Three lectures per week. Three hours credit. 

150. Microscopic Technique 

A laboratory course in methods of preparing tissues for microscopic study. Prerequisite: Bl 

1-2, 31 and 32. Time to be arranged. Two hours credit. 

161. Introduction to General Physiology 

A study of matter and energy in relation to living things; solution; diffusion and osmotic 
pressure; the physico-chemical structure of protoplasm. Prerequisites: Bl 1-2 or equivalent, 
and Ch 1-2, 31 and Ph 1-2. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
One semester. Four hours credit. 

162. General Physiology 

The fundamental life processes of organisms from a general and comparative viewpoint. 
Prerequisite: Bl 161. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. One 
semester. Four hours credit. 

191. History and Philosophy of Biology 

A discussion of the historical developments and philosophical implication of biology. Re- 
quired of all majors in biology; open to all seniors who have had a course in biology. 
Prerequisites: Bl 1-2 or equivalent and Pi 33-34 and 100. Two hours per week for one 
semester. Two hours credit. 

199. Introduction to Research 

Special work for advanced students and preparation of thesis. Admission only with the 
approval of head of the department. Credits to be arranged. 



CHEMISTRY (Ch) 



The Department requires for a Major besides General Chemistry 1-2 and a course in 
Qualitative Analysis, Organic Chemistry 131-132, Physical Chemistry 141 and 142, Quan- 
titative Analysis 153-154 and a more advanced course as an elective, which may be Physio- 
logical Chemistry 161-162 and 163-164, or Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 181-182, 183-184, 
or Qualitative Organic Chemistry 171 followed by Organic Preparations 172. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. General Inorganic Chemistry 

A course dealing with the fundamental laws and theories of Chemistry together with the 
systematic study of the elements. The laboratory experiments are designed to illustrate the 
matter of the course. Obligatory for all Freshmen B.S. Lectures two hours per week; lab- 
oratory four hours per week. Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

3. Hospital Chemistry 

An introductory survey for nurses, including principles of general chemistry, with special 
applications to nursing practice. Laboratory in blood and urine analysis. Three hours credit. 

11-12. Introductory Chemistry 

A general introduction to the science of chemistry designed to give the student a back- 
ground in this science. This course cannot be substituted for Ch 1-2 to qualify for advanced 
courses in chemistry. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory two hours per week. Two 
semesters. Six hours credit. 

31. Elementary Qualitative Analysis 

This course involves the theoretical and practical study of the principles underlying the 
isolation of the metallic and acid-forming elements. Obligatory for all Pre-Medical students 
and for all those majoring in Chemistry. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four 
hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Fifty-three 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

131-132. Organic Chemistry 

The principles of Organic Chemistry and its relation to General Chemistry are emphasized. 
Typical organic compounds are studied. General reactions and characteristics are discussed, 
and many applications to practical life are given. Obligatory for all Pre-Medical students and 
for those majoring in Chemistry. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per 
week. Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

135. Special Problems in Chemistry 

Presentation of problems in chemistry which have philosophical significance. Three lectures 

per week. First semester. Three hours credit. 

141. Elementary Physical Chemistry I 

This course is intended to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles of chemical 
theory. The structure of matter, thermodynamics and electrochemistry are discussed. Obli- 
gatory for Chemistry and Biology majors. Lectures three hours per week; laboratory three 
hours per week. Four hours credit. 

142. Elementary Physical Chemistry II 

This course includes the different methods of molecular weight determination, electrical 
conductance, and the determination of hydrogen-ion concentration colorimetrically and elec- 
trometrically. Obligatory for Chemistry majors. Presupposes a knowledge of calculus. Three 
hours per week, one laboratory period. Four hours credit. 

153-154. Quantitative Analysis 

A more extended discussion of the theory and practice of volumetric and gravimetric 
methods, including an introduction to electroanalysis. Lecture two hours per week; labora- 
tory six hours per week. Two semesters. Fight hours credit. 

161-162. Physiological Chemistry 

An elementary course dealing with the Chemistry of the carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. 
The chemical basis underlying the phenomena of metabolism, enzyme absorption and 
digestion are discussed. Lecture two hours per week. Two semesters. Four hours credit. 

163-164. Physiological Chemistry Laboratory 

A laboratory course to accompany 161-162. Four hours per week. Two semesters. Four 

hours credit. 

171. Qualitative Organic Analysis 

Purification and identification of organic compounds. Special emphasis is placed upon the 
practical analysis of compounds of organic origin. Lecture one hour per week; laboratory 
six hours. One semester. Three hours credit. 

172. Organic Preparations 

A one-semester course for seniors majoring in Chemistry. Lecture one hour; laboratory 
six hours. Three hours credit. 

181-182. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

A course for seniors majoring in Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 141 and 142. Three 

periods of lecture per week. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

183-184. Inorganic Preparations 

A course for seniors majoring in Chemistry. Two periods of laboratory per week. Two 

semesters. Four hours credit. 

199. Advanced Seminar 

For seniors majoring in Chemistry. Credit to be arranged. 

Page Fifty-four Spring Hill College 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 

The Greek and Latin languages are so related as the media of a unified ancient culture 
that it seems desirable for the student who majors in classical languages to have courses in 
both. It is possible, however, for a student to major in either one separately. Arrangement 
of a joint concentration must be made with the Chairman. In both Greek and Latin, 
courses numbered lower than 10 are for students who fail to present at least two high 
school units in the language. Prerequisite for any upper division course are: three courses 
or their equivalent in high school units, and one year of lower division college work. 

GKEEK (Gk) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Elementary Gree\ 

A study of the inflection of article, nouns, adjectives, and pronouns. Conjugation of the 
verb to be, of pure and contract verbs. A study of the principal syntactical construction in 
the case of nouns, and in the moods and tenses of verbs. Irregular and mi verbs. Readings 
from Zenophon. Written exercises, and class criticisms. Six hours credit. 

11. Prose Composition 

Written exercises involving a review of Greek syntax, or based on assigned models. An 
attempt at rhetorical composition, as shown in selections from Saint John Chrysostom and 
Saint Basil. Three hours credit. 

12. Gree\ Historians 

Selected readings from Thucydides and Zenophon. Three hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101. Attic Orators 

The development of the Attic prose and oratory as illustrated by selections from Lysias, 
Isocrates, Demosthenes. Three hours credit. 

102. Demosthenes 

Selections from the Phillippics and Olynthiacs with attention to the essentials of Greek 
oratory; structure of speeches, idiomatic usages. Demosthenes' attitude towards his con- 
temporaries. Three hours credit. 

131. Gree\ Drama 

The reading of selected passages from Euripides' Hecuba, and Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus, 
together with a close examination of plot, characters, and method of Greek tragedy, as 
exemplified in the works of Euripides and Sophocles. Three hours credit. 

132. Aeschylus 

A study of selected works of the early master of Greek tragedy. Three hours credit. 

142. Homer 

Selected passages from the Iliad or the Odyssey, read in the original with a comprehensive 
knowledge of the structure and story of the entire poem in English translation. Comparison 
with Virgil's Aeneid. Three hours credit. 

181. History of Gree\ Literature 

A survey course, aimed at acquainting the student with Greek modes of thought and 
literary expression as the basis of culture and humanistic philosophy. The origin and de- 
velopment of the chief literary types will be traced, including epic, lyric, and dramatic 
poetry, history, oratory, and Philosophy. This course is open to students majoring in any 
of the Humanities. Three hours credit. 

199. Advanced Study 

A seminar for students majoring in the Classics. Three hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Fifty-jive 



LATIN (Lt) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Elementary Latin 

A study of the fundamentals of the Latin language, including the inflection of nouns, ad- 
jectives and pronouns; conjugation of the regular, defective, deponent and semi-deponent 
verbs, and the periphrastic conjugations. Written exercises and class criticisms. Thorough 
drill in the principal syntactical construction in the case of nouns, and the moods and 
tenses of verbs. Readings of selections from four books of Caesar's Gallic War, supple- 
mented by practice in simple composition. Eight hours credit. 

3-4. Latin Composition 

A further study of applied syntax in the subordinate clauses, result and concessive; direct 
and indirect questions; practice in correct word order and sequence of tenses. Reading of 
Cicero's First and Third Catilinarians. Completion of the study of syntactical construction, 
including the construction of indirect discourse, of dependent clauses both in direct and 
indirect discourse, and conditional sentences. Application of the rules of prosody and verse 
structure, scansion of the dactyllic hexameter. Eight hours credit. 

5. Liturgical Latin 

A course in the language of the Church's liturgy, with prose and poetry selections from 
the Bible, the Missale Romanum, the Breviarium Romanum and the devotional literature 
of the Church. Prerequisite: 2 years Latin. Three hours credit. 

11-12. Cicero 

The Letters, as shedding light not only on Cicero's character and manifold relations with 
others, but also on the troublous times in which he lived. The Essays, as applying the 
principles of popularized philosophy to subjects of deep human interest; especially his two 
charming dialogues on Old Age and Friendship. The Speeches, in particular the defense of 
Archias, as giving the student an appreciation of Cicero's views on liberal education and its 
formative influence on man. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

31. Roman Historians 

Study of the historical methods and literary style of Sallust, Tacitus and Livy. Further 

practice in writing Latin according to the historical stylists. Three hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101. Latin Lyric Poetry 

The Odes of Horace, and selected Poems of Catullus, studied as examples of the classical 
lyrics. The life of Horace and his contemporaries, his attitude to the Augustan Age as 
reflected in his works. Roman dependence on Greek models. Horace's literary influence. 
Three hours credit. 

102. Roman Satire 

A comparative study of the Latin Satirists, Horace and Juvenal, and their influence on 
modern literature. Originality of Roman Satire; tracing its growth from Lucullus through 
the Golden Age to Juvenal and Martial. Three hours a-edit. 

103. Roman Epic 

Principal phases of Virgil's Aeneid, with special emphasis on Hellenic tradition and par- 
ticularly Roman aspects. Three hours credit. 

104. Roman Philosophy 

Philosophical works of Cicero, Seneca, and Lucretius studied with special attention given 
to the Roman elements in Eclecticism, Stoicism and Epicurianism. Three hours credit. 

131. Patristic Latin 

Reading from Tertullian, Cyprian, Lactantius, Minucius Felix, Jerome, Ambrose, Augustine, 

Boethius, Prudentius, Fortunatus, etc. Three hours credit. 

Page Fifty-six Spring Hill College 



73. Latin Comedy 

"he origin, development and chief characteristics of the Roman stage, as exemplified in 
ielected plays of Plautus and Terence. The two masters of the comic contrasted; their 
haracter portrayals, attitude to morality, prosody, language. Comparison with comic drama 
>f Aristophanes. Three hours credit. 

'81. History of Latin Literature 

\ survey course aimed at acquainting the student with Roman modes of thought, and 
iteratory expression as the basis of culture and humanistic philosophy. Traces the develop- 
nent of literary genres through the cycles of epic, lyric, and satiric poetry; of history, 
>ratory, philosophy. Three hours credit. 



COMMERCE 



ACCOUNTING (Ac) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

11-12. Elementary Principles of Accounting 

This is the basic course in accounting, stressing fundamentals, and providing practice in 

bookkeeping and accounting procedures. It is required of all commerce students. Six hours 

credit. 

31-32. Intermediate Accounting 

A study of more advanced principles of accounting theory, including the study of the 
management viewpoint of accounting. Prerequisite: Ac 11-12. Required of all commerce 
students. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101-102. Advanced Accounting Problems 

Takes up advanced phases of accounting problems, including installment sales, partnership 
liquidations, consolidated statements, foreign exchange and fiduciary accounting. Prerequi- 
site: Ac 31-32. Required of all accounting majors. Six hours credit. 

131. Cost Accounting 

This is the first course in cost accounting. It includes a study of material, labor, and 
factory burden accounting, process costs, etc. Prerequisite: Ac 31-32 and junior standing. 
Required of all accounting majors. Three hours credit. 

142. Accounting Systems-Design and Installation 

This course covers a study of the design and installation of accounting systems. A study 
of special types of accounting systems is carried out as well. Prerequisites: Ac 31-32 and 
131. Required of all accounting majors. Three hours credit. 

161-162. Income Tax Procedure 

\ Embraces a study of the Federal tax law. Emphasizes individual and partnership tax prob- 
' lcms during the first semester and corporation, gift, estate, reorganization and payroll tax 

problems during the second semester. Prerequisites: Accounting 31-32 and junior standing. 

Required of all accounting majors. Open to pre-law students as an elective. Six hours credit. 

1 171-172. Elementary and Advanced Auditing 

This course covers theory and practice of auditing. Includes practice sets and supplemental 
; readings. Prerequisites: Accounting 101-102 and 131 (may be taken concurrently). Re- 
[ quired of all accounting majors. Two semesters. Six hours ci'edit. 

! Bulletin of Information Page Fifty-seven 



181. Controller ship 

The functions, duties, and responsibilities of the chief accounting officer in a public o 
private business enterprise are studied. Problems of office organization and managemen 
are treated as well as integration of staff activities. Takes up the work of the interna 
auditors and the study of internal accounting procedures and control. Prerequisite: Ac 101 
102, 131, and 142. Elective for accounting majors. Two hours credit. 

182. Advanced Cost Accounting 

Takes up more advanced topics of cost accounting and treats standard costs comprehensively 
Prerequisites: Ac 31-32 and 132. Elective for accounting majors. Two hours credit. 

183. Budgetary Accounting 

The course stresses the preparation of a complete budget for managerial control for ar 
industrial concern. Consideration will be given to the budget problems of other types o:; 
concerns. Elective for accounting majors. Two hours credit. 

184. Governmental Accounting 

In this course the student studies the special features of accounting for municipalities anc 
other governmental units as well as institutional accounting. Prerequisites: Accounting 101- 
102. Elective for accounting majors. Two hours credit. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (Ba) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

31-32. Business Law 

A general course covering contracts; agency; corporation; negotiable instruments; sales; 

bailments and carriers; unfair competition. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

115. Corporation Finance 

A study of the problems of financial management of a business. Some of the topics con- 
sidered are: promotion; stocks, bonds, notes, accounts; source of fixed capital; distribution 
of earnings; expansion; reorganization. Three hours credit. 

117. Introduction to Industrial Management 
A survey course in management principles and methods. The student is given a compre- 
hensive view of modern practices of planning, organizing, and controlling various functional 
activities in business. Three hours credit. 

124. Investments 

A study of the nature and principles of Investment with their application to the types of] 

securities and an analysis of the channels of distribution. Three hours credit. 

132. Marketing 

A presentation of the fundamental principles and methods of marketing functions with an 
analysis of consumer buying habits and motives. Three hours credit. 

133. Retailing Problems 

A course including the intensive study of retail store management and operations. Buying 
operations, stock control and merchandise planning are also included. Open to merchan- 
dising seniors, others with permission of the instructor. Three hours credit. 

136. Purchasing 

The study of the principles of purchasing and types of actual problems confronting a pur- 
chasing agent in the performance of his duties. Three hours credit. 

Page Fifty-eight Spring Hill College 



38. Credit Management 

his course includes the study of the work of the credit manager in the various types of 
larketing agencies, and credit from the mercantile credit manager's viewpoint. Three 
ours credit. 

42. Wholesaling 

study is made of the functions of the wholesaler, relations between manufacturers and 
:tailers, price policies, quantity discounts, etc. Three hours credit. 

43. Advertising 

study of the practices and policies of advertising in the main type of advertising media. 
hree hours credit. 

44. Salesmanship 

he underlying economic and psychological laws which govern selling. Three hours credit. 

45. Sales Management 

study of the following problems: product, market and distribution research, recruiting, 
lecting, contrasting, training and equipping salesmen, compensation plans, sales territories, 
uotas, sales promotion and sales policies. Three hours credit. 

47. Ban\ Administration 

his course deals with managerial problems of banks. Problems including organization, 
ipital structure, earning power, supervision and regulation, examinations, call reports, and 
:her regulatory matters are taken up. Open to Banking and Finance seniors, others with 
amission of the instructor. Three hours credit. 

52. Insurance 

he principles and practices underlying the more important types of insurance as factors 
private and business life. Three hours credit. 

74. Real Estate 

course embracing a study of the economic, legal, and administrative principles of real 
roperty. Three hours credit. 

81. Time and Motion Study 

course in the fundamentals of operation analysis, motion economy, time study, job stand- 
and industrial efficiency. Three hours credit. 

82. Manufacturing Industries 
survey course in the technical factors and processes, peculiar business problems and 

onomic characteristics of the leading manufacturing industries of the United States. Three 
ours credit. 

83-184. Industrial Management Problems 

his course includes a study of problems involving planning, layout, operation, administra- 
on, wage incentive plans, industrial safety in the manufacturing plant; also included is a 
udy of economic factors of production and the structure of industrial organization. Open 
industrial management majors, others with permission of instructor. Six hours credit. 

86. Personnel Problems 

n analysis of the principles of selection, training, care, and administration of personnel, 
msidered in the light of current attempts to solve employer-employee differences. Three 
ours credit. 

ECONOMICS (Ec) 

OWER DIVISION COURSES 

/. Introduction to Economics 

brief analysis of economic principles designed for non-economic majors. Three hours 
■edit. 

ulletin of Information Page Fifty-nine 



35-36. Principles of Economics 

This course is intended to give a thorough explanation of the laws and principles under- 
lying the economic system. It embraces a detailed analysis of production, distribution, ex- 
change and consumption. A prerequisite for all upper division courses in economics.' Six 
hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

106. Money and Banking 

Designed to give the students a firm grasp of the economic principles and theories under- 
lying money, and the functions and operation of investment, commercial, and central bank- 
ing. Three hours credit. 

107. Monetary Theory 

An elementary investigation of the leading contributions of classical and contemporarj , 
monetary theorists. Three hours credit. 

110. Economics of Public Finance 

This course is directed to a practical knowledge of the principles and methods of govern- 
mental fiscal operations and policies. Three hours credit. 

112. Land Economics 

A survey of the principles of land utilization and the major problems arising therefrom 

Three hours credit. 

122. Labor Economics 

Reviews social, economic, historical, and political factors significant to orientation in in 
dustrial relations; analysis of main phases of industrial conflict with proposed solutions 
Three hours credit. 

123. Labor Law 

Study of modern labor legislation which so deeply and so continuously affects the problem: 
of industrial relations. Three hours credit. 

124. Industrial Relations 

This course is designed to give the student a practical demonstration of union-managemen 
relationships; the student is required to participate in actual bargaining conferences undeij 
the guidance of representative union and management leaders. Three hours credit. 

126. Economic History of the United States 

The economy of colonial America; commerce, agriculture and finance after 1789; the in 
dustrial revolution; the westward movement; development of banking, transportation anc 
labor; rise of the corporation; growth of foreign trade; the United States as a world eco 
nomic power. Three hours credit. 

128. Statistics 

An introductory consideration of statistical theory; collection, presentation, analysis and im 
terpretation of data; frequency distribution; time series; measures of central tendency anc 
dispersion; index numbers; correlation; forecasting. Three hours credit. 

134. International Trade 

This course is designated to give the student a foundation in the theories and operatior 
of international commercial policy and practice, foreign investment and foreign exchange 
Three hours credit. 



138-139. Economic Analysis 

A two semester course in intermediate economics embracing studies in demand and supply 

marginal analysis. Six hours axdit. 

Page Sixty Spring Hill Collegt 



45. Business Cycles 

:onomic organization in its relation to the business fluctuations; indexes of business con- 
tions; timing duration and amplitudes of cycles; international aspects; the problems of 
recasting and control. Three hours credit. 

S3. History of Economic Thought 

n historical analysis of the development of Economic Theory. A study of the chief con- 
ibutions of the Physiocrats, Adam Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, Say, Mill, Cairnes, Carey, 
astiat, Marx, Bohm-Bawerk, J. B. Clark, Marshall, and Veblen. Three hours credit. 

55. Contemporary Economic Problems 

he economic principles involved in the existing maladjustments will be considered in the 
jht of current attempts to secure a solution. Three hours credit. 

56. Contemporary Economic Thought 

survey of contemporary economic literature considering present school of economic 
ought, their points of difference and theoretical tendencies. Three hours credit. 

EDUCATION (Ed) 

For information concerning Teacher Training the student is referred to the section of 
is Bulletin on Programs of Curricula. 

DWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Introduction to Education 

n orientation course which surveys the field of education and of teacher training. Its 
>jective is to provide the prospective teacher with an understanding of the personal and 
ofessional qualifications, relationships and responsibilities of the teacher. Three hours credit. 

1. History of Education 
survey of educational theory, institutions and practice during ancient and modern times 

ith special emphasis on the European system which influenced the more recent educa- 
snal movements in Europe and America. Three hours credit. 

2. History of Education in the U. S. 

his course begins with a study of the origin and development of the various school sys- 
ms, denominational and public, in the United States. Three hours credit. 

1. Philosophy of Education 
study of the philosophical principles underlying the different systems of education with 
special emphasis on the Jesuit system. Three hours credit. 

I. Educational Psychology 

he student is directed in the study of the laws of learning, the learning curve, the effi- 
ency and permanence of learning, transfer of training, the result of exercise, the measure- 
ent of achievement, the use of tests, the new type examinations. Three hours credit. 

PPER DIVISION COURSES 

II. Principles of High School Teaching 

mong the topics considered are: the aims in instruction, the class exercise; the essentials 
good questioning; the modes of instruction; the importance of study; the prelection or 
signment; the repetition or recitation; standards and measurements; the individual and 
cial elements in secondary instruction. Three hours credit. 

12. Statistical Methods in Education 

he purpose of the course is to acquaint teachers and prospective teachers with those 
atistical techniques which are most important from the viewpoint of education. Three 
ours credit. 

ulletin of Information Page Sixty-one 



135. Extra-Curricular Activities 

The purpose of this course is to instruct the students of education in the importance of 
student participation in school activities outside the classroom. Daily lecture and daily two- 
hour period of field work. Three hours credit. 

150. Co-operative Study of Secondary Schools 
A course designed to acquaint the student with the work accomplished by the Committee 
set up for the Co-operative Study of Secondary School Standards in order to establish the 
ground work for an appreciation and critical evaluation of the standards that should govern 
secondary schools. Three hours credit. 

161. Materials and Methods of Teaching English 

The organization of a balanced curriculum in English. Integration of High School English 

with college requirements. Three hours credit. 

166. Materials and Methods of Teaching History 

The object of this course is to give the student an intimate knowledge of the aim, methods, 

and contents of the history course in the high school. Three hours credit. 

171. Materials and Methods of Teaching Science 
The course purports to evaluate the place of the natural sciences in the high school cur- 
riculum and study in survey the materials that make up the science courses along with the 
methods best suited to achieve the aims of the science courses. Three hours credit. 

176. Materials and Methods of Teaching Language 

A study of the contents and modern methods of presentation of the various modern lan- 
guages as well as the classical languages. Special emphasis is laid on the more recent 
methods of teaching Spanish and French. Three hours credit. 

181. Materials and Methods of Teaching Mathematics 
Current trends and problems in the teaching of mathematics in secondary schools, methods 
of selecting and organizing teaching materials, effective teaching procedures, diagnostic and 
remedial techniques. Three hours credit. 

183. Materials and Methods of Teaching Commercial Subjects 
A study and evaluation of the contents of various Commercial Courses as found in different 
school systems; a survey of the more advanced methods in the presentation of commercial 
subjects; the place of the commercial subjects in the modern high school. Three hours credit. 

195-196. Observation and Practice Teaching 
Schedule to be arranged by each student individually with the head of the department of 
education. Candidates for degrees with a major in education must present a minimum of 
4 semester hours in observation and practice teaching with a minimum of 40 full periods of 
class teaching and 15 hours of observation. Four hours credit. 

ENGINEERING (Eg) 

The following courses, administered by the Department of Mathematics and Physics, 
are offered for students who wish to initiate their engineering training at Spring Hill. 

1. Introductory Geology 

A lecture course in general phenomena of dynamic and structural geology, illustrating ex- 
ternal and internal geological agencies and processes with resulting land forms. Two hours' 
credit. 

2. Surveying 

Theory, use and adjustment of instruments; methods of computation; some practical field 
work and topographic map-making. Three hours credit. 

3-4. Engineering Drawing 

Lettering, geometrical construction, orthographic projection, dimensions. Four hours credit. 

Page Sixty -two Spring Hill College] 



5. Descriptive Geometry 

Critical study of the science of drawing; location of points, lines and planes; single-curved 
surfaces; surfaces of revolution; tangent lines and planes; intersection of surfaces; shades 
and shadows; perspective. Prerequisite: Eg 3 and 4 and solid geometry. Three hours credit. 

7. Introductory Engineering Problems 

Designed to determine the student's abilities, desires and shortcomings in work of an en- 
gineering nature, to aid the student in getting a better grasp of essential elementary mathe- 
matics, and to prepare him for handling better part of his first term of physics. Two hours 
credit. 



ENGLISH (En) 

The student desiring to major in English must include in his program of studies En 
161 or 162 or 182 and at least 15 semester hours in other upper division courses, as ap- 
proved by the department chairman. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

FG. Fundamental Grammar and Usage 

A course in the essentials of grammar and correct usage. Required of Freshmen and others 
who may be deficient in the theory or practice of correct English. A no-credit course but 
satisfactory work on the part of those taking it is prerequisite to any other English credit. 

1-2. Freshman Composition 

An intensive study of the various forms of compositions, with frequent practice in writing 
and the reading and analysis of models. Required of all Freshmen, unless excused by special 
permission. Six hours credit. 

31. Types of Prose 

A literary study of the chief types of prose writing, narrative and expository with modern 
examples preferred. A substitute for Freshman Composition in the case of superior entering 
students. Three hours credit. 

32. Poetry 

A course in the nature and elements of poetrv, principles of versification. Reading, analysis 
and appreciation of selected poetry. Practice in verse writing. Three hours credit. 

33. Report Writing 

A study of the fundamentals of planning and writing special reports, particularly for busi- 
ness purposes; analvsis of actual specimens for content, style and manner of presentation. 
Two lectures per week. Two hours credit. 

41. The Short Story 

The rise and development of this literary form. Extensive reading of great examples from 
world literature, with particular attention to the American short story. Analysis as well 
as composition required. Three hours credit. 

45. The Drama 

The theorv of the drama will be studied and illustrated through historical examples, chiefly 
from English playwrights. Developments in play production will be studied as well as 
composition. Three hours credit. 

61-62. Survey of English Literature 

A studv of the historical background of the chief masterpieces of English literature from 
Beowulf to Thomas Hardy. Readings in the principal authors, and critical papers at weekly 
intervals. Required of all A.B. Sophomores. Six hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Sixty-three 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

132-133. Shakespeare 

Shakespeare's life, influence; source of his drama; an acquaintance by reading and assign- 
ments with the Shakespearean literature of criticism; reading, analysis, and close study of 
six to twelve plays. Three to six hours credit. 

146. The Novel 

The principal purpose of this course is to study the technique of the novel, and the various j 
schools of fiction. Reading of six selected novels, with special attention to literary and 
ethical critics. Three hours credit. 

150. Aesthetics and Literary Criticism 

The philosophical basis of aesthetics, the elements of taste; theories of criticism; a survey 
of critical standards; a study of the schools of criticism, and of the work of the chief literary 
critics. Three hours credit. 

161. Newman 

A study of three of the English Cardinal's great works; The Idea of a University, The 
Present Position of Catholics in England, and Apologia pro Vita Sua; detailed analysis of 
thought, and examination of literary merits. Three hours credits. 

162. Catholic Literary Revival 

A study of the chief figures in the modern literary resurgence stemming from Newman 
and his movement. Special emphasis on Hopkins and Chesterton. Three hours credit. 

181. Milton 

A survey course of the life and work of Milton, with special emphasis on the longer poems. 
Three hours credit. 

182. Chaucer 

A specialized study of the poet and of his works, with particular attention to the Canter- 
bury Tales. Three hours credit. 

185. Romantic Poets 

A specialized study of the five great Romantic Poets; Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, 

and Shelly. Philosophy and literary theory of the period. Three hours credit. 

188. Victorian Poets 

The most important movements and figures in poetry during the Victorian period, with 

detailed study of Browning and Tennyson. Three hours credit. 

191. American Literature 

A rapid survey of the chief American poets and prose writers of the Nineteenth Century. 

Three hours credit. 

195. Modern Literature 

A careful examination of the best writers in English and America who have risen to promi- 
nence since World War I. Three hours credit. 

199. Special Study for Advanced Students 
Two hours credit. 

HISTORY (Hs) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Early Medieval History 
Significance of the Roman Empire; conflict with Christianity; triumph of Christianity; 
migration of nations; the Franks, the Lombards, and the Holy See; the Byzantine empire; 
the Carolingians, Church and State; feudalism; monasticism; Germany and the Holy Roman 
Empire; lay-investiture. Three hours credit. 

Page Sixty-four Spring Hill College 



2. Late Medieval History 

Islam; the Crusades; the Hoenstaufens; invasion of the Mongola; St. Louis; social and 
economic features of the Middle Ages; medieval education and culture; Scholasticism; de- 
velopment of political and constitutional institutions; the Avignon Captivity; Western 
Schism; the Hundred Years' War; the Wars of the Roses; eastern Europe; consolidation of 
European monarchies. Three hours credit. 

31. Renaissance and Revolution 

The revival of learning, of art and politics; social conditions; the protestant revolution in 
Germany, England and Scotland; the Catholic revival; the Hugenot wars in France; the 
revolt of the Netherlands; the Thirty Years' War; the Puritan revolution; the age of Louis 
XIV; the war of Spanish succession; the Church and State; the making of Russia; the rise 
of Prussia: the downfall of Poland; the French revolution; Napoleon Bonaparte. Three 
hours credit. 

32. Europe Since 1814 

The industrial revolution; England and France in the nineteenth century; the unification 
of Germany and of Italy; the social, political and religious conditions in Europe; the eastern 
question; the partition of Africa; World War I; reconstruction. Three hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

111-112. American History 7-/7 

This course aims to bring into relief the outstanding influences that have shaped the his- 
tory of the United States from the colonial period to our own; it stresses topics of import 
for the social, economic and political development of the nation, the circumstances that led 
to America's participation in the Great Wars, with the resulting stimulus to a clearer 
national consciousness of the values and significance of American citizenship. Six hours 
credit. 

133-134. English History 7-77 

A survey of English history; the Celts; Roman Britain; the Anglo-Saxon invasions; Chris- 
tianity and monasticism; pre-conquest England; the Norman conquest; medieval institu- 
tions; feudalism; Magna Charta; evolution of parliament; Church and State; the Hundred 
Years' War and the Black Death; social and economic aspects; religious movements; in- 
tellectual progress; the Lancastrian experiment; Wars of the Roses; Tudor absolutism; the 
protestant revolt; Erastianism and the Church of England; the Stuarts; the Puritan Revo- 
lution; the restoration; the revolution of 1688-1689 and settlement under William and 
Mary; Hanoverian England; agrarian and industrial revolutions; imperialism; Victorian 
England; British commonwealth of nations; recent events of constitutional, social, economic 
and political importance. Six hours credit. 

141-142. History of Latin America 7-77 

European background; early discoveries and settlements in the islands and on the main- 
land of north, central and south America; civilization of the natives; Spanish and Portu- 
guese colonial systems; contribution of the Jesuit and Franciscan missionaries to culture 
and civilization; abuses of the Spanish government; the struggles for independence; history 
of independent Mexico and Central American countries after 1821; economic, social and 
political life; significance and influence; relation of the Latin American countries with one 
another, the United States and the world; Pan-Americanism; Latin America and the World 
War; present situation and outlook. Six hours credit. 

151-152. History of the Church 7-77 

A study of the development and the spread of . the Church and its institutions from the 

beginning to the present. Six hours credit. 

MATHEMATICS (Mt) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Intermediate Algebra 

This course is to be elected by students with deficient training. Three hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Sixty -five 



2. Trigonometry 

Elements of plane trigonometry; this course together with the preceding will satisfy mini- 
mum mathematics requirements for introductory science courses. Three hours credit. 

3. Algebra and Trigonometry 

A course in algebra and trigonometry designed primarily for science majors and engineer- 
ing students. Three hours credit. 

4. Analytic Geometry and Calculus 
A study of usual topics of plane analytic geometry with an introduction to calculus. Three 
hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101-102. Calculus 1-11 
Differentiation of transcendental functions with applications; formulas, methods and ap- 
plications of integration; series; space coordinate and vectors; partial differentiation; mul- 
tiple integration; applications. Prerequisite: Mt 4 or equivalent. Six hours credit. 

131. Solid Analytic Geometry 

An exposition of the basic topics of space analytic geometry coordinated with the theory 

of vectors and matrices. Three hours credit. 

151. Differential Equations 
An elementary treatment of ordinary differential equations; simultaneous equations and| 
linear differential equations; applications; introduction to partial differential equations. 
Three hours credit. 

161-162. Advanced Calculus I-II 

Special topics in ordinary differential equations including Laplace transform, numerical 
methods and series solutions; boundary value problems; vector analysis; partial differential 
equations with applications. Six hours credit. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 

The courses of the Department are in the French, German, and Spanish languages. The 
nature of the courses and their content are such as to secure the following sequence of 
objectives; a) A reading knowledge sufficient to fulfill the lower division objective in the 
field of modern language; b) A mastery of grammar and syntax, and an acquaintance with 
the elements of style as an immediate preparation for the study of literature. This objective 
will also include an ability to converse with correct pronunciation and natural inflexion; 
c) A knowledge and appreciation of the literature of the language; d) An acquaintance with 
the history and culture of the people from which the language comes. 

Two years of lower division work or the equivalent will be required as a prerequisite 
to upper division courses. Majors and other students who take upper division courses in 
the Department of Modern Languages will be advised in the selection of courses by the 
Chairman. 



FRENCH (Fr) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Elementary French 
The Article, the Noun, the Adjective, the Numerals, Pronouns, Conjugation of regular verbs 
and of the more common irregular verbs. Irregular verbs. Use of Moods and Tenses. Gov- 
ernment of Verbs. Order of words in the sentence. Frequent themes. Six hours credit. 

Page Sixty-six Spring Hill College 



31-32. Intermediate French 

Review of Syntax, Prose Composition. Reading of graduated texts: Daudet, de Maupassant, 

Coppee, Bourget. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

111-112. Survey of French Literature I-II 

An anthology study of chief literary masterpieces in chronological order. Six hours credit. 

131-132. The French Novel 

A detailed study of different types of the French novel; Classical, Romantic, Realistic and 

Contemporary, with reference to theme, characters, treatment, and style. Three hours credit. 

141. The French Drama 

A study of the technique of the French drama. Special stress will be laid on the classical 
tragedy, Racine and Corneille. Three hours credit. 

142. The French Comedy 

A reading course with special attention to the works of Moliere. Three hours credit. 

153. Lyric Poets of the Nineteenth Century 

A specialized study of the romantic movement as illustrated in the poetry of Hugo, Musset, 

Vigny and Lamar tine. Three hours credit. 

181. The Catholic Renaissance 

Study of the growing influence of Catholic religious thought in the prose and poetry of 
modern France, up to and including Claudel and Maritain. Three hours credit. 

199. Seminar for Advanced Students 

Special readings for advanced training. Three hours credit. 



GERMAN (Gr) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Reading Course 

A systematically progressive course designed to give the student facility in reading simple 

German. Elements in phonetics and grammar. Six hours credit. 

31-32. Intermediate Reading Course 

This study is based on comprehensive readings of modern prose with special emphasis on 
vocabulary building, idioms, and grammar review. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

111-112. Advanced German 

Advanced composition. Survey of the history of German literature. Six hours credit. 

124. Scientific German 

Courses designed to give facility in reading science periodicals in German. Three hours credit. 

131-132. German Drama 

Technique of the drama in German, with special study of Goethe and Schiller. Two semes- 
ters. Six hours credit. 

141-142. The German Novel 

A reading course in the modern novel. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Sixty-seven 



SPANISH (Sp) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Elementary Spanish 

Phonetics; pronounciation, accentuation, punctuation, capitalization. Rules governing nouns, 
adjectives and pronouns. Regular Verbs, Auxiliary Verbs: ser, estar, haber. Reading and 
drill in easy conversation. Study of irregular verbs, reflexive verbs, orthographic changing 
verbs. The subjunctive in independent and subordinate clauses. Reading and translation 
of easy stories. Six hours credit. 

31-32. Intermediate Spanish 

An introduction to Spanish Prose, Reading, with a review of basic rules of grammar. 
Vocabulary building, Spanish word order, idiomatic expressions, reading aids, key words. 
Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

111. Spanish History 

The fascinating story of a country that has colonized half of the Western World, and at 
one time or another has held dominion over more than half of the present territory of 
the United States. An introduction to Spanish literature and civilization. Three hours credit. 

112. Don Quijote 

The life and works of Cervantes, with special stress on Don Quijote, the supreme master- 
piece of Spanish literature. A study of the content of the story, character portrayals, humor, 
style. Three hours credit. 

131. The Golden Age 

The period of literature covering the last part of the Fifteenth Century, and extending to 
the end of the Seventeenth Century, the period in which Spanish culture attains its highest 
development. Three hours credit. 

132. Advanced Composition 

Study of Spanish models with a view to composition in imitation. Reading magazines and 
newspapers. Three hours credit. 



MUSIC (Mu) 

Courses in music are administered by the Department of English. The objectives of the 
music program are (a) to provide the instruction necessary for understanding and appre- 
ciating music as a fine art; (b) to present music as a means of broadening and enriching 
cultural life; (c) to stimulate interest in the sacred music of the Catholic Church and to 
disseminate fuller knowledge and appreciation of it; (d) to provide opportunities for par- 
ticipation in various musical organizations. 

The College offers no major in music nor the extensive training necessary for full 
professional musicianship. However, courses are offered in theoretical and applied music, 
both instrumental and vocal, as electives towards an academic degree. Students may select 
music as a minor with the approval of the Dean. For a minor eighteen hours are required, 
at least eight of which must be in Theory. In Applied Music a minimum of six hours credit 
must be gained from courses taught by private lessons in instrument or voice. A maximum 
of four hours credit will be given for satisfactory ensemble work in Applied Music, pro- 
vided the student is registered at the same time in a course in Theory. Approval by the 
instructor is required for admission into any course in music. Choir members must be 
registered in the course in Liturgical Music to gain credit for their ensemble work. Private 
lessons are taught either for one hour or two half hour periods a week. Beginners may 
take private lessons, but not for credit. Instruments other than piano and organ must be 
furnished by the student. 

Page Sixty-eight Spring Hill College 



I THEORY 

1. Elementary Harmony 

An integrated study of the harmonic basis of music. Emphasis on analytical harmony 

from perspective of hearing and understanding rather than of composing. Two hours credit. 

3-4. Appreciation of Music 

A study of the elements necessary for intellectual enjoyment and appreciation of music. 
Principles of melody, rhythm, harmony, and tone color. Study of structure and forms. 
Symphonies, operas, and concertos analyzed and explained. Recordings played in the Music 
room two hours a week. One hour of lecture. Four hours credit. 

5. History of Music 

A survey of the development of music from ancient to modern times with special emphasis 
on the classical and romantic schools. Two hours credit. 

6. Gregorian Chant 

The theory of Gregorian Chant or Plainsong. Neums, modes, chironomy. Syllabic and 
melismatic chants. Psalmody. Recordings studied. Practical vocal study of important chants. 
Two hours credit. 

151-152. Liturgical Music 

The traditions and ideals of the sacred music of the Catholic Church. The aesthetics of 
sacred music as presented in the Motu Proprio of Pius X and in other ecclesiastical legis- 
lation. Evaluation of Gregorian, polyphonic, and modern music. Study of the recording by 
the Solesmes monks and the Sistine choir. Required of all choral students to gain credit 
in choir section of ensemble music. Four hours credit. 

II APPLIED MUSIC 
A. Private Lessons 

11-12. Intermediate Piano 

Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 

15-16. Voice 

Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 

21-22. Organ Studies 

Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 

25-26. String or Wind Instrument 
Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 

111-112. Advanced Piano 

Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 

115-116. Advanced Vocal Studies 
Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 

B. Ensemble 

17-18. Glee Club 

Group work. One hour credit. 

19-20. Choir 

Group work. One hour credit. 

27-28. Band 

Group work. One hour credit. 

29-30. Orchestra 

Group work. One hour credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Sixty-nine 



PHILOSOPHY (PI) 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 



7. Introduction to Scholasticism 

The sources of the Scholastic system. Relation of philosophy to science and to faith. Prin- 
cipal tenets of scholasticism. First semester. Two hours credit. 

11. Dialectics 

The laws of thought; idea and the term; judgment and the proposition; reasoning and the 
syllogism. Fallacies. Methodology. Three hours credit. 

30. Epistemology 

A specialized study of the truth of thought, skepticism, methodic doubt; the criteria of 
certitude, and the problem of error. Four hours credit. 

31. Logic and Critics 
A rapid survey of dialectics, with exercises in reasoning, followed bv a study of the truth 
of thought, the sources of cognition, and the criteria of certitude. Three hours credit. 

32. General Metaphysics 
A rapid survey of chief theses in Ontology and Cosmology, particularly as they affect the 
philosophy of science. Three hours credit. 

33-34. Cosmology 

A specialized study of the properties of bodies: extension, inertia, activity; the laws of 
nature, possibility of miracles; the ultimate constitution of bodies. Metaphysical nature and 
properties of quality, motion, time and space. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

35-36. Ontology 

A specialized study of being, its primary determinations and transcendental attributes; the 
various concepts of substance and accident. Individuality and personality; relaxation and 
cause. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100. Sense Psychology 

A study of sense perception, imagination, memory; the sensuous appetite, movement, and 
feeling. Four hours credit. 

101. Rational Psychology 

The study of phenomena of rational life, intellectual concepts, rational appetency, free will, 
and determination. Origin, nature and destiny of the human soul. Four hours credit. 

131. Psychology 

The human intellect and its proper obiect; its spirituality proved bv its acts; origin of ideas; 
innate ideas. Empiricism and Ontologism rejected. The human will and its formal obiect; 
its freedom, its control of the other faculties. Nature of the human soul; a substantial 
principle, simple, spiritual, immortal, its union with the body; its origin. The unity and 
antiquity of the human race. Four lectures per week. Three hours credit. 

142. Special Metaphysics (Theodicy) 

Proofs for the existence of God; the validity of human knowledge about the divine nature; 
God's infinity, simplicity, uniqueness, immutability, eternitv, immensity and omnipresence; 
the operative attributes, intellect and will; creation; providence and the problem of evil. 
Three hours credit. 

161. History of Ancient Philosophy 

Oriental Philosophy; the Greeks; Socrates, Plato. Aristotle. The Gnostics and Neoplationists. 
The early Fathers of the Church. Medieval Philosophy. The rival schools and tendencies 
among the Scholastics. The Thomistic synthesis. Two hours credit. 

Page Seventy Spring Hill College 



162. History of Modern Philosophy. 

Descartes and his followers; Malabranche, Locke, Hume, Voltaire and the Encyclopaedists, 
Leibnitz Sensists and the Scottish School. The Transcendentalists: Kant, Fichte, Schelling 
and their school of thought. The Neo-Kantians. Neo-Scholasticism and the present outlook. 
Two hours credit. 

180. Ethics for Nurses 

General principles of ethics; duties to self and to fellow man; family obligations; profes- 
sional obligations; obligations to civil authority; religion and morality; points in the history 
of medical ethics. Lectures three hours per week for one semester. Three hours credit. 

181. General Ethics 

The ultimate end of man. The existence of objective morality. Constituents of the moral 
order. Eternal and natural law. Nature of obligation. Three hours credit. 

182. Special Ethics 

Particular rights and duties. Duty of natural religion; of self-preservation; of veracity. The 
right of self-defense; of property. The social relations of man. Conjugal society. Civil 
society. State and Education. International law. Three hours credit. 

199. Seminar for Advanced Students 
Two or four hours credit. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Pe) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Freshman Physical Education 

Freshmen (non-veterans) must participate in organized gymnasium activities; competition 

on varsity level will suffice. One hour credit. 

5. First Aid 

Course in the teaching of safety and useful emergency techniques. One hour credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

For Juniors and Seniors who are in Teacher-training Wor\ 

103. Introduction to Physical Education 

Brief discussion of purposes and aims of education, in particular physical education; intro- 
duction to physical education. Three hours credit. 

104. Health and Safety Education 

Individual health and safety; fundamental techniques. Three hours credit. 

105. Principles, Organizations and Administration of Secondary School 
Physical Education Program 

A discussion of proper programs tor high schools, and of the administration of interscho- 
lastic and intramural athletics and a physical education program. Three hours credit. 

106. Principles and Practice of Advanced Coaching 

Instruction in coaching of football, basketball and baseball with practical experience in 
coaching grammar school teams. Three hours credit. 

107. Theory and Practice of Physical Education 

This course includes playing of varsity basketball or baseball; may be taken twice. Three 
hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Seventy-one 



PHYSICS (Ph) 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 



1-2. General Physics I-II 

Introduction to essential features of classical physics including laboratory work. Prerequisites: 
Mt 1 and 2 or their equivalent (concurrent registration not permitted). Eight hours credit. 

11. Introductory Physics 

Survey of classical physics including laboratory work to give student a general background. 

Four hours credit. 

71-72. Mechanics 

Extensive introduction to mechanics to supplement content of Ph 1 for engineering students 

and science majors. Prerequisite: Registration in Mt 101. Four hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100. Special Problems in Physics 

Presentation of physical problems which have philosophical significance. Three hours credit. 

131-132. Intermediate Physics I-II (Heat and Electricity) 

Treatment on intermediate level of topics in theory of heat and of fundamental laws con- 
cerning electric properties of matter and electromagnetism. Six hours credit. 

133-134. Experimental Physics I-II 

An advanced student laboratory to accompany the preceding course. Two hours credit. 

141-142. Intermediate Physics II1-1V (Sound, Light and Modern Physics) 
Introduction to topics in the theory of light phenomena and of sound and acoustical phe- 
nomena; discussion of fundamental theories of modern physics. Six hours credit. 

143-144. Experimental Physics III-IV 

An advanced student laboratory to accompany the preceding course. Two hours credit. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE (Po) 

The courses listed below are administered through the Department of History and 
Social Sciences. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. American Government 

American national government; the historical background and drafting of the federal con- 
stitution; the Bill of Rights, civil rights and citizenship, parties and campaigns, and the 
organization and functions of the executive, legislative and judicial branches of the national 
government; local and state government in the United States; the executive, legislative and 
judicial branches of state government; organization and functions of administration in 
counties and cities. Six hours credit. 

3. Comparative Government 

A comparative study of the governmental organizations and administrations of England 
and the Commonwealth, the governments of western and central continental Europe, the 
Soviet Union, Latin American and far eastern governments. Three hours credit. 

Page Seventy-two Spring Hill College 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

121. Party Politics 

The development of political parties in the United States; importance of the extraconstitu- 
tional element in American government. State parties and practical politics in local govern- 
ment. Three hours credit. 

132. Constitutional Law 

Fundamental principles of the United States Constitution viewed in the light of their his- 
tory, development and application. Three hours credit. 



PSYCHOLOGY (Ps) 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 



131. General Psychology 

The normal functioning of the mind. Proper object of the intellect. Origin of ideas. Nature 

and relationship of the various faculties of the soul. Three hours credit. 

134. Experimental Psychology 

The methods and typical results of the experimental psychology of sensation, perception, 
emotion, memory, imagination, habit, thought, volition, the relation of consciousness to its 
object. Four hours credit. 

142. Abnormal Psychology 

Relation of the abnormal to normal in psychology. Present-day conception of mental dis- 
orders. The chief types. Remote causes; inherited emotional instability, environment. Proxi- 
mate or precipitating causes. Detailed study of examples of major classifications. Treat- 
ment. Three hours credit. 



RELIGION (Rl) 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 



31-32. Christian Apologetics 

Revelation and the Church of Christ. The study of Christianity as a revealed religion. 
Divine institution of the Church. Marks of the Church. Its end and constitution. Required 
of all Catholic Freshmen. Two semesters. Four hours credit. 

61. Moral Guidance 

The Catholic Theory of Morality. The Fundamental obligations of the Christian. Detailed 
study of the first three commandments with application to practical cases. One semester. 
Required of all Catholic Sophomores. Two hours credit. 

62. The Commandments 

A detailed study of the last seven commandments and the precepts of the Church. A 
special consideration of the duties and obligations peculiar to the various professions. One 
semester. Required of Catholic Sophomores. Two hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

131-132. Catholic Dogma 

The nature of God; Creation and elevation of Man; Original sin; the Incarnation; the Re- 
demption. Special emphasis is given to the Scriptural texts that illustrate these truths. Two 
semesters. Required of all Catholic Juniors. Four hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Seventy-three 



141. The Sacraments 

An advanced study of the meaning and value of the Catholic Sacramental System. A de- 
tailed study of the first six Sacraments and their place in the Catholic laymen's spiritual 
life. One semester. Required of all Catholic Seniors. Two hours credit. 

142. Christian Marriage 

Catholic doctrine on the morality of sex. The Sacrament of Matrimony. Premarital chastity. 
Prenuptial requirements. Rights, duties and graces of married couples. One semester. Re- 
quired of all Catholic Seniors. Two hours credit. 

150. Christian Life and Worship 
An advanced study of the Catholic liturgy. The Grace-life at work in true Christian wor- 
ship. One semester. Two hours credit. 

Special Courses for Non-Catholic Students 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

13-14. Comparative Religion 
Definition and division of religions. A general history of the world's great religions with 
stress on the common factors and characteristic differences. Required of non-Catholic Fresh- 
men and Sophomores. Given odd years. Four hours credit. 

33-34. Biblical Criticism 

The notion of inspiration. Application to the Books of the New Testament. Method and 
spirit of higher criticism. Historical value of the New Testament. Difficulties answered. 
Required of non-Catholic Freshmen and Sophomores. Given even years. Four hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

137-138. Catholic Beliefs 

A course designed to give the student an intelligent understanding of and acquaintance 
with characteristic points of Catholic teaching and practice. Required of non-Catholic Jun- 
iors and Seniors. Given odd years. Four hours credit. 

143-144. Christian Morals 
The obligation of morality; basis in reason and aids from faith; practical applications. Re- 
quired of non-Catholic Juniors and Seniors. Given even years. Four hours credit. 



SOCIOLOGY (So) 



The courses listed below are administered through the Department of History and 
Social Sciences. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Introductory Sociology 

An analytical study of the structure of society; primary and secondary communities and 
associations; temporary formations; social processes; social stability and social change. Three 
hours credit. 

2. Social Problems and Agencies 

A study of some of the more important social problems; the agencies of control; solutions 
to problems in conformity with sound sociological principles. Three hours credit. 

21. Introduction to Public Health 

A survey course on the development of the science of public health, including the principles 
of sanitation and communicable disease control, public health organization and administra- 
tion; the relation of personal hygiene to public health. Primarily a course for nurses. ThreeX 
hours credit. 

Page Seventy-four Spring Hill College-, 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

115. Culture History 

A study of the beginning and development of culture, especially among extant primitive 

people. Two hours credit. 

121. Social Case Wor\ 

A study of the philosophy, methods, processes and ethical aspects of case work. Three 

hours credit. 

131. Social History: Social Origins 

A study of primitive societal institutions, domestic, economic, political and religious. Three 
hours credit. 

132. Social History: History of Social Wor\ 

A study of the historical development of social work from Grecian and Roman practice 
to modern era. Three hours credit. 

141. Social Problems: Communism 

A critical study of Russia's strategy and tactics from the Bolshevik Revolution to the 

present. Three hours credit. 

143. Christian Social Order 

A study of the ideal social order as delineated in the Papal Encyclicals, Rerum Novarum 
and Quadragesimo Anno. Rejection of the opposite extremes of collectivism and rugged 
individualism. Three hours credit. 

151. The Family 

A study of the bonds of membership, interaction, functions, coordination of family; changes 
and variations in families; the integration and disintegration of family life; the extra- 
familial influences on family. Three hours credit. 

152. The State and International Relations 

Various theories regarding the origin of civil authority and the state; the various types of 
states; the functions of the state; the coordinating bodies within the state; international 
society; war and means of promoting peace. Three hours credit. 

153. Social Problems: Crime and Delinquency 

A study of the extent, causes and cures of crime, the agencies of the police system, institu- 
tions of correction. Three hours credit. 



SPEECH (Ex) 

The courses in speech are administered by the Department of English. No speech course, 
however, will be accepted in the Department of English as a substitute for any English 
course. A minor in speech is permitted. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Basic Principles of Speech 

A study of the basic principles of speech; platform manner; voice control; qualities of a 

good speech; factors of attention; ends of speech; wording the speech; delivery. Four hours 

credit. 

3. Types of Speech 

The speech to entertain; to inform; to impress; to convince; to stimulate; to persuade; to 

actuate. Three hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Seventy-five 



4. Occasional Address 

After-dinner speaking; speeches of courtesy; speeches of acceptance; delivery of reports; 
presenting ideas. Three hours credit. 

5. Classroom Speech 

This course is intended for those training to become teachers. A study of the teacher's 
speech problem; the vocal mechanism; a study of language; speech pathology; the art of 
speaking. Three hours credit. 

6. Business Speech 

A course planned for students in the department of commerce, with emphasis on the short 
business report. Three hours credit. 

10. Parliamentary Law 

Study and application of "Robert's Rules of Order." Two hours credit. 

31. Debating and Argumentation 

The principles of debating; propositions; briefing; logical reasoning; fallacies; refutation. 
Two hours credit. 

32. Principles of Discussion 

Principles of group discussion; panels; forums; formal and informal discussion. Three hours 
credit. 

33. Extemporaneous Speaking 

The art of extemporaneous speaking; essentials of speaking without preparation. Three 
hours credit. 

34. Radio Speaking 

The occasional radio address; emphasis on the difference between speaking before a visible 
audience and a mike. Three hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101. Advanced Debating and Discussion 
Emphasis on actual debating and discussion. Study of the world's great debates and dis- 
cussions. Three hours credit. 

103. Advanced Radio Speaking 

Newscasts; spot-commercials; live-talent shows; transcribed and recorded programs; special 

events. Three hours credit. 

105. Dramatic Readings 

Oral interpretation of the printed word; short plays; readings. Three hours credit. 



Page Seventy-six Spring Hill College^ 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



May 24, 1949 



Bachelor of Arts 



Albert John Boudreaux 
magna cum laude 

Edward Thomas Cassidy, Jr. 

Flem Gregory Cliett, Jr. 
Warren Eugene Freeman, S.J. 

John Crosby Harwood 



Robert Eugene Houssiere 
cum laude 

Joseph Niel Jarreau, S.J. 

Thomas Joseph Jenniskens, S.J. 

Harold Earl Johnson 
Walter Charles McCauley, S.J. 

David James Stodder 



Bachelor of Science 



Paul Robert Beining, S.J. 

Lawrence Walker Berrier, Jr. 

Claude Paul Boudreaux, S.J. 

Stuart Alexander Chamblin, Jr. 

magna cum laude 

Jack Turner Coleman 
John Joseph Doolan, Jr. 

Hiram W. H. Dykes 
Charles Heubach Foster 

Arnaldo Juan Garcia 
Nobert Sidney Gilly, Jr. 
Adam Cleveland Grantham, Jr. 
George Paterson Havens 
John Lawrence Hinton 
John Francis Johnley, III 
Arthur Gerard Kehoe, S.J. 



William Carl Kidwell, S.J. 

George Seymour Lee 

Earl Ernest Little, Jr. 

William Howard Moran, S.J. 

Norman Kerry O'Connor 

John Arnold Pitman 

Joseph Maddock Powers 

Louis Steven Prokop 

Joseph T. Richie 

Henry Stephens Sheffield 

Thomas Fettyplace Stein, Jr. 

Vincent Paul Stouter, S.J. 

Rudolph Ernest Urruela 

Julius Gerard Walle, S.J. 

William Ashurst Ward 

Robert J. Zietz 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Seventy-seven 



Bachelor of Science in Commerce 



Milton Oliver Booth 
Charles E. Butler, Jr. 

George E. Cramer 

Joseph Lee Davis, Jr. 

Edward Paul de la Parte 

John D. Felis 
cum laude 

Joseph Ferdinand Hackmeyer 

Lawrence Joseph Harrison 

Bernard L. Heffernan 

Marion Garner Kearley 

John Anthony Landry 

Donald R. Ludvigsen 

Robert Edward Lund 



John Travis McKenzie, Jr. 

James David McPhillips 
James Stafford Maginnis 
Charles Fred Oberkirch 
Joseph Anthony O'Brien 

Charles Lanier Padgett 

Henry Edward Reimer, Jr. 
magna cum laude 

George Edward Schwing 

John Albert Snelling 

Paul Howard Toomey 

Donald A. Towner 

Theodore W. N. Turk 

Leon E. Zimlich 



July 22, 1949 



Bachelor of Arts 



Sister Eleanor Galligan 
Brother Francis Gavin, S.C. 
Alvin Jacob Holloway, S.J. 



Brother Regis Moccia, S.C. 
Norman Joseph Rogge, S.J. 



Bachelor of Science 

William Oscar Allen 

Sister Mary Marcella Crilly, R.S.M. 

Wallace John Davis 

Mary Margaret Flock 

Richard Joseph Gaul 

maxima cum laude 



Joseph Ignatius Kresse 

Sidney Clarke Phillips, Jr. 

Brother James Roussell, S.C. 

Frank Bertrand Schwartzel 

Leslie Earl Whitehead 

Richard Samuel Whitten 



Bachelor of Science in Commerce 



John Edward Busbee 

William Bruce Carpenter, Jr. 

cum laude 

George W. Edgar 
Page Seventy-eight 



Clyde Earnest Galloway 

William Ray Lynch 
William Thomas Moss 
Francis Glover Watson 



Spring Hill Colleg 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



Regular Session (1949-1950) 



Full Time Students 



(Explanation of Code: A — arts; N — natural science; S — social science; C — commerce; 1 — 
freshman; 2 — sophomore; 3 — junior; 4 — senior; 5 — post-graduate; a code symbol com- 
pounded from preceding appears in parentheses after the student's name in the following 
list.) 



Abbene, C. A., (S2) 

Pine Bluff, Ark. 
Albright, R. G., S.J., (A3) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Allen, A. R., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Allen, F. H., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Allen, H. E., (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Alonzo, R. T., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ames, C. A., Jr., (Nl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Amorosi, J. T., (S3) 

Jersey City, N. J. 
Andrews, J. M., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ankerson, L. J., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Artim, M., (S2) 

Beaver Meadows, Pa. 
Ashley, R., (S2) 

Shreveport, La. 
Avellino, M., (S3) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Averett, T., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Azar, D., (N4) 

Dothan, Ala. 
Baggett, J. L., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Baisden, R. L., (N2) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Baker, W. C, (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ball, J. D., (CI) 

Loretto, Ky. 



Ball, T. N., (CI) 

Loretto, Ky. 
Bankhead, J. C, (C3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Barganier, W., (N3) 

Andalusia, Ala. 
Barrett, G. E., (S2) 

Nashville, Tenn. 
Barrineau, T., (N4) 

Milan, Tenn. 
Barter, C. J., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Barter, P. G., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bauler, R. J., (S3) 

Wheaton, Oil. 
Belart, R. V., (N2) 

Jackson, Miss. 
Benitez, R. A., (N2) 

New Orleans, La. 
Benito, J. R., (N2) 

Guayama, P. R. 
Berger, N. J., (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Berte, J., S.J., (A4) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Berte, J. J., (Nl) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Bertke, T. J., (C2) 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
Bethany, M. L., (C4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Bibb, J. T., (N2) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Billeaud, A., (N3) 

Lafayette, La. 
Bingham, J., S.J., (A4) 

Long Island, N. Y. 



Bishop, P. T., (N3) 

Elizabeth, N. J. 
Blackman, J. A., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bock, J. A., Jr., (Nl) 

East St. Louis, 111. 
Boggs, O. H., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bollettiere, N. J., (SI) 

Pelham, N. Y. 
Boiling, F. E., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bonin, J. M., (S3) 

Kaplan, La. 
Bosarge, J., (N2) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Bosarge, W. V., (C2) 

Bayou la Batre, Ala. 
Boudreaux, P. H., (C4) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Bower, L. L., (Nl) 

Covington, La. 
Bower, W. T., (C3) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Boykin, M. A., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Boyle, C. J., (A4) 

Burlington, N. J. 
Bradley, F. E., Jr., (S3) 

Moncks Corner, S. C. 
Bradley, F. W., (S2) 

Hickman Mills, Mo. 
Bradley, W. J., (N3) 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Brady, D. F., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Brannon, E. J., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Seventy-nine 



Braud, L. P., (N2) 

Thibodaux, La. 
Brennan, W. G., S.J., (N33 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Bressie, R. E., (S2) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Brill, C. O., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Brock, S„ (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bronson, M. N., (Si) 

Chicago, 111. 
Brou, Br. Glenn (S2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Brown, J. R., Jr., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Brown, R, Jr., (C4) 

Asheville, N. C. 
Browne, R. M., (Nl) 

Asheville, N. C. 
Browning, J. P., (N3) 

Hot Springs, Ark. 
Bruni, J. A., (Al) 

North Bergen, N. J. 
Branson, R. B., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Buchanan, J. J., (A3) 

Pontiac, Mich. 
Buckley, Br. Albert (S2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Bufkin, J. C, (N3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Buitrago, H. G., (S4) 

Guayama, P. R. 
Bunkley, F. K., Jr. (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Burke, J. R., (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Burroughs, C. K., (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Burt, J. A., (N2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Byrd, J. C, (C2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Calametti, J., Jr., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Caldwell, F. A., (N2) 

Canton, Mass. 
Callahan, R. D., (C2) 

Bergenfield, N. J. 
Cannamela, R. A., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Carlin, J., (S4) 

Medford, Mass. 
Carney, Maj. J., (Cl) 

Brookley Field, Ala. 
Carraza, J. A., Jr., (N3) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Carroll, C. R., (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Carter, J., S.J., (N3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Caruso, C. J., (N2) 

Greenville, Miss. 
Carwie, J., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cassidy, E. T., (C5) 

Jennings, La. 
Cassidy, L. D., Jr., (S3) 

Clayton, Mo. 
Cefalu, R., Jr., (Cl) 

Helena, Ark. 
Chastain, M. Mc, (Nl) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Chavez, J. O., S.J., (A4) 

Albuquerque, N. M. 
Chinery, Br. Faber, (S2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Clark, B. E., (A3) 

Louisville, Ky. 
Clawson, R. C, (N4) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Clement, J. F., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cloney, R. D., S.J., (N3) 

New York, N. Y. 
Cloonan, Br. Stephen (S2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Coakley, J. A., (C3) 

Wyncote, Pa. 
Cochran, L. K., (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Cochran, R. W., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cohen, H. F., S.J., (A3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Coleman, F. J., (C3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Collins, H. J., Jr., (C2) 

Dallas, Texas 
Comiskey, G. A., (Al) 

New Orleans, La. 
Conmay, F. E., Jr., (N4) 

Toledo, Ohio 
Conmay, T. P., (N3) 

Toledo, Ohio 
Connell, R. C, (Cl) 

Racine, Wis. 
Connolly, J. F., (N2) 

Newark, N. J. 
Connor, R. B., (Cl) 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Coogan, F., (S4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Cordell, M., Jr., (S2) 

Phenix City, Ala. 
Council, J. M., (N2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Courchesne, J. N., (N2) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 



Cousins, E., S.J., (A4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Cox, J. E., (S3) 

Bronx, N. Y. 
Coyle, C. G., Jr., (SI) 

New Orleans, La. 
Crabtree, J., S.J., (A3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cratin, P. D., (N3) 

Sherrill, Ark. 
Crawford, R. P., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Creagan, D., S.J., (A3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Cuervo, J. B. R., (N2) 

New York, N. Y. 
Cuevas, J., (N4) 

San Juan, P. R. 
Culley, T. D., (Al) 

Shawnee, Okla. 
Cummins, J. F., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Curtin, G. F., S.J., (A4) 

Knoxville, Tenn. 
Cush, C. J., (N2) 

Shreveport, La. 
Daly, T. F. (A2) 

Pelham, N. Y. 
Daly, W., (S4) 

Lafayette, La. 
D'Amato, N., (Nl) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Darby, F. F., Jr., (N4) 

Arnaudville, La. 
Daugherty, H. G., (C2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Davis, E. B., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Davis, F. R., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Davis, J. A., (C4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Dean, W. C, (SI) 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
De Barros, J. F., (SI) 

New Orleans, La. 
Debrow, C, (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Dees, W. L., (Cl) 

Grand Bay, Ala. 
Deeves, J. F., S.J., (N3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Deeves, W. H., (Nl) 

New Orleans, La. 
Degnan, J. E., (A2) 

Maiden, Mass. 
Deimel, . A., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Demeranville, S. J., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Page Eighty 



Spring Hill College 



DeMouy, M., (N3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Denton, L. F„ (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
DeRussy, E., S.J., (S4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Dever, D. J., (Nl) 

Miami, Fla. 
Devine, J. R, S.J., (N3) 

Melrose, Penn. 
Dewine, J. E., (Si) 

Cleveland Hghts., Ohio 
DiBona, N. (N3) 

Quincy, Mass. 
Dickson, W. P., (C3) 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Diez, C, Jr., (S2) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Doiron, J. R., Jr., (Cl) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Donaghey, Br. Borgia, (S2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Donahue, J. F., (C3) 

Plainville, Conn. 
Doolan, W. S., (C4) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Dorn, E. G., (C3) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Downey, J. C, (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Downey, W. J., (C2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Duff, D. F., (N2) 

Little Rock, Ark. 
Dughi, C. H., (S2) 

Tampa, Fla. 
DuMont, S. P., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Duncan, J. N., (C4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Durick, W. D., (S4) 

Bessemer, Ala. 
Eaton, G. R., Ill, (S3) 

Rochester, N. Y. 
Edgar, J. W., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Edmiston, F. W., (S3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Edwards, J. D., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Egan, J. J., (Cl) 

Oak Park, 111. 
Egan, R. W., (C2) 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Egelhoff, R. W., (Cl) 

Warrington, Fla. 
Eidman, A. G., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Elcan, P. D., (N3) 

Memphis, Tenn. 



Ellis, T. H, Jr., (Nl) 

Whistler, Ala. 
Ellzey, S. E., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala . 
Elosua, B., (N2) 

Monterrey, Mex. 
Emmet, J. S., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
England, J. E., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ernest, S. W., Jr., (Cl) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Escalante, C. C, (N4) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Escalante, W. C, (Nl) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Evans, B. E., (Nl) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Evans, Br. Carl (S2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Evans, H. L., (C3) 

Vicksburg, Miss. 
Fagerstrom, W., (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Faget, Br. Bosco (S2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Fagot, H. J., S.J., (N4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Farnell, D. R., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Favre, W. W., Jr., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Fearn, J. A., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Fedor, R. E., (N2) 

Deerfield Beach, Fla. 
Fedor, R. L., (N2) 

Deerfield Beach, Fla. 
Feil, P. J., (S3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Ferlita, E. C, (S4) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Fey, B. J., (Cl) 

Alexandria, La. 
Finch, W., (N3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Fisher, J. N., (SI) 

Pelham Manor, N. Y. 
Florez, A. R., (C3) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Fogelsanger, W. J., S.J., (S4) 

Hamburg, N. Y. 
Frederick, J. A., (S2) 

Westallis, Wis. 
Freeman, W. E., S.J., (A5) 

New Orleans, La. 
Freidheim, J. M., (Cl) 

Belle Glade, Fla. 
Fuchs, E. M., (N4) 

Woodhaven, N. Y. 



Fumo, J. A., (SI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Gallagher, W. B., Jr., (Nl) 

Ocala, Fla. 
Garbin, F. G., (N3) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Garcia, A. J., (S4) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Garraway, E. H., (S3) 

Grand Bay, Ala. 
Garraway, J. A., (S2) 

Irvington, Ala. 
Geil, R. J., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Genest, A. S., (Nl) 

Miami Shores, Fla. 
Geoghegan, M. H. (A3) 

Bardstown, Ky. 
Gerety, H. F., (Cl) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Giara, E. J., Jr., (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Gibbons, H. E., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Gideon, R. P., (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Gier, R. E., (C2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Giglio, J. F., Ill, (N3) 

Shreveport, La. 
Gilbert, E., Jr., (S3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Gilbert, Br. Emile (S2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Gilbert, T. P., (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Gioscia, V. J., (S2) 

Long Island, N. Y. 
Girod, M. K., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Goeke, H., (Nl) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Goldsby, J. W., Ill, (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Grahame, D., (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Gray, F., Jr., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Greco, A. L., Jr., (C4) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Green, R. B., Jr., (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Grumbly, G. P., (S2) 

Lake Worth, Fla. 
Guillot, M. A., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Haas, W. O., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hall, W. M, (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Eighty-one 



Halpin, G. A., (S3) 

East St. Louis, 111. 
Hamel, E. G., Jr., (N3) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Hannigan, H. B., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Hardy, D. E., (C2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Harwood, J. C, (A5) 

Alexandria, La. 
Harwood, R., (SI) 

Alexandria, La. 
Haskins, J. A., (C4) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Hastings, F. D., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hawie, D. E., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hawie, W. F., Jr., (C4) 

Fairhope, Ala. 
Hebert, R. J., (N4) 

Jennings, La. 
Henry, J. P., (S3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Herbert, H. W., (S2) 

Pelham, N. Y. 
Herlong, L., S.J., (N3) 

Lake Charles, La. 
Herold, V. R., (S2) 

Paterson, N. J. 
Hickey, J. L., (N3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Hickey, T. J., Jr., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hietter, J. G., (A2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hietter, V. G., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hill, J. B., Jr., (SI) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Hindmarch, J. W., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hoar, L. J., Jr., (Al) 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Hoffman, J. J., (SI) 

Paducah, Ky. 
Holcomb, B. T., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Holland, P. B., (C2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Hollis, W. W., (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Holloway, A. J., S.J., (A5) 

Shreveport, La. 
Honodel, R. J., (C3) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Honovich, J., Jr., (N3) 

Shreveport, La. 
Horstmann, R. B., S.J., (S5) 

New Orleans, La. 



Houston, R. L., (Nl) 

Worcester, Mass. 
Hubbard, J. L., Jr., (N3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hudson, H. D., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hulcher, R. C, (N3) 

Portsmouth, Va. 
Hunley, Br. Denis (S2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Hurley, D. J., (C4) 

Portsmouth, Va. 
Irby, E. S., (C3) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Jackmond, O. B., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Jackson, R. E., Jr., (C2) 

Somerville, N. J. 
Jackson, W. W., (Nl) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Jacque, A. G., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Jarreau, N., S.J., (A5) 

New Orleans, La. 
Jasany, R. J., (A2) 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Jenniskens, T., S.J., (A5) 

New Orleans, La. 
Jessie, R. M., (C3) 

Faust, N. Y. 
Johnson, C. M., Jr. (C3) 

Charleston, S. C. 
Johnson, E., S.J., (A3) 

Shreveport, La. 
Johnson, J. R., (Nl) 

Montgomery, Ala. 
Johnson, P. D., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Johnson, W. J., (Nl) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Johnston, R. F., (CI) 

Neptune Beach, Fla. 
Jongebloed, N. H., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Jordan, R. G., (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Kager, J. A., (C3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Kahler, H. V., (C3) 

Quincy, Mass. 
Kain, J. S., (Nl) 

Sarasota, Fla. 
Kane, R. A., (CI) 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Karcher, T. J., Jr., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Kaufman, S. R., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Kay, J. S., (Nl) 

Whisder, Ala. 



Kearley, J. H., (N3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Keene, F. H., (C3) 

Bardstown, Ky. 
Kelley, C. M., (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Kelly, J. J., (C4) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Kelly, T. M., S.J., (A4) 

Boston, Mass. 
Kelton, F. H., (CI) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Kennedy, F. K., (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Kennedy, W. D., (N2) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Kettler, E. W., Jr., (N2) 

Helena, Ark. 
Kilborn, B., (A2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Killorin, E. W., (A2) 

Savannah, Ga, 
King, J. A., (C3) 

Monticello, N. Y. 
Kirkland, R., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Kirwan, J. R., Jr., (SI) 

Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 
Klein, R. F., (N3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Klein, W. M., (N2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Koch, C, S.J., (N3) 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Koch, M., (S4) 

Central Romana, D. R. 
Koch, P., S.J., (A4) 

Dallas, Texas 
Konzen, B. J., (Nl) 

Chicago, 111. 
Kramer, F. J., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
LaColla, E. M., (N2) 

Long Island, N. Y. 
Ladas, E. H., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
LaMar, D. R., (A3) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Langan, J. N., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Langan, M. J., Jr., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Langermann, L. C, (Nl) 

Shreveport, La. 
Lapeyrouse, R. L., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Larroque, Br. Lucian (S2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
LaSallc, A. W., (S2) 

New Iberia, La. 



Page Eighty-two 



Spring Hill College 



Latham, E. C, (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Latham, R., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lauten, R. C, Jr., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lauve, L. O., (S2) 

Alexandria, La. 
Layden, A. J., (C3) 

Forney, Texas 
LeBlanc, C. J., Jr., (N4) 

Raceland, La. 
LeBlanc, D. W., (C3) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
LeBlanc, J. M., (SI) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
LeBlanc, L. P., Jr., (N2) 

Golden Meadows, La. 
Lee, R. E., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lee, T. P., (A2) 

Miami, Fla. 
Lee, W. H., Jr. (S4) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Leech, W. H., (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lemoine, D. J., (N4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Lenz, W. D., (C4) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Leon, F. E., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lewis, G., Jr., (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lilly, R. F., (C3) 

Pittsburg, Pa. 
Linares, F. G., (CI) 

Havana, Cuba 
Lindsey, W. H., (S4) 

Baton Roug,e La. 
Littlefield, D. J., (A3) 

Faust, N. Y. 
Lockett, J. A., S.J., (N3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Logan, T. W., (CI) 

San Antonio, Texas 
Logan, W. E., Jr., (A3) 

Pass Christian, Miss. 
Lopez, L. M., (SI) 

Mexico City, Mex. 
Lorio, L. A., S.J., (N5) 

New Orleans, La. 
Lousteau, G. J., (C2) 

Norco, La. , 
Luther, J. A., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lynch, Br. Jude (S2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Lynch, T. J., (N3) 

Chicago, 111. 



Lyons, H. A., (SI) 

Tupper Lake, N. Y. 
McBride, W. H., S.J., (N5) 

New York, N. Y. 
McCabe, J. P., (C4) 

Roselidale, Mass. 
McCabe, P. P., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McCaffrey, R. A., (S4) 

Birmingham, Ala. 
McCarthy, D., (CI) 

Glen Head, N. Y. 
McCarthy, P. J., S.J., (N5) 

Rochester, N. Y. 
McCauley, W., S.J., (A5) 

Toledo, Ohio 
McCluskey, R., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McConville, E., (S2) 

Cleveland, Ohio 
McCormick, H. T., (S3) 

Newark, N. J. 
McCourt, C. L., (C2) 

Pine Bluff, Ark. 
McCown, P. M., (A2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McCown, R. M., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McClure, T., (Si) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McEvoy, E. T., Jr., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McFadden, S. F., Jr., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McGinn, L. C, (C3) 

Montgomery, Ala. 
McGranahan, J. M., (C2) 

Shreveport, La. 
Mclnerney, W. J., (N3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
McKean, L. L., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McLaughlin, A. J., (CI) 

Paterson, N. J. 
McLaughlin, C. A., (Al) 

Staten Island, N. Y. 
McManus, W., (S4) 

Bronx, N. Y. 
McMillan, A. P., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McMillan, J. M., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McMillan, R. A., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McMorrow, Br. Xavier (S2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
McQuillen, C. J., Jr., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 



McQuillen, W. J., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
MacMahon, W. O., (S3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
MacMurtrie, J. A., S.J., (A3) 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Madden, T. J., S.J., (A4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Magee, N. F., (A4) 

Lancaster, Pa. 
Malloy, W. J., Jr., (A3) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Maloney, F. J., (S2) 

Larchmont, N. Y. 
Maloof, J. M., (S2) 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Maples, M. J., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Markham, J. E., Jr., (C3) 

Rutland, Vt. 
Markwalter, H. J., Jr., (Nl) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Markwalter, J. A., (C4) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Marone, B. (Al) 

Rochester, N. Y. 
Marroquin, C. A., (N2) 

Guatemala, C. A. 
Martin, J. P., (S4) 

Welsh, La. 
Martinez, M. E., (N4) 

Guayama, P. R. 
Mason, E. A., Jr., (CI) 

Pascagoula, Miss. 
Mason, M. M., (A3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Mason, W. E., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Mayhall, W. E., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Meier, T. J., (Nl) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Mercier, A. L., (S2) 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 
Mese, J. D., (N4) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Metzger, L. H., Jr., (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Michels, J. G., (N2) 

New York, N. Y. 
Michie, R. R., (S2) 

Labadieville, La. 
Miciotto, J. C, (Nl) 

Shreveport, La. 
Miklic, J., (A3) 

Demopolis, Ala. 
Mills, W. W., (SI) 

Citronelle, Ala. 
Minto, J. G., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Eighty-three 



Moan, F. X., S.J., (A4) 

Baltimore, Md. 
Mobley, W. E., Jr., (C2) 

Macon, Ga. 
Monica, L. R., (S2) 

Garyville, La. 
Monica, L. T., (S4) 

Garyville, La. 
Montero, W. M., (CI) 

Norco, La. 
Montesi, F., (CI) 

Memphis, Tenn. 
Moody, J. D., Ill (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Moore, J. C, (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Moore, M. W., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Moorhead, T. J., (S2) 

Wilmette, 111. 
Morgan, J. F., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Morris, W. F., Jr., (N4) 

North Bergen, N. J. 
Morrissette, H. T., (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Moseley, C. F., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Mould, O. A., (CI) 

Arlington, Va. 
Mouton, J. A., (CI) 

Lafayette, La. 
Mugnier, J. R., Jr., (S2) 

New Orleans, La. 
Mulherin, L., Jr., (CI) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Mullins, W. I., (N4) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Mullan, R. F., S.J., (N4) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Murphy, A. G., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Murphy, F. T., (S4) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Murphy, J. G., (S2) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Murray, W. W., (Nl) 

Chicago, 111. 
Naman, L. J., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Nashert, W., (S3) 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Nee, W., S.J., (N5) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Nelson, V. A., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Neuhoff, L., Ill, (C2) 

Roanoke, Va. 
Newlin, C. R., Jr., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Nix, B. R., (CI) 

Robertsdale, Ala. 
Nobert, D. A., (C4) 

Memphis, Tenn. 
Nobles, N. E., (N3) 

Blakeley Island, Ala. 
Nolan, D. B., (A2) 

New York, N. Y. 
Nolan, J. J., (A3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Nolan, S. T., (N3) 

Bayou la Batre, Ala. 
Nolan, W. W., (A4) 

New York, N. Y. 
Noto, T. A., (Nl) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Nusz, J. L., (C3) 

Bowling Green, Ky. 
O'Brien, C. L., (S3) 

Newburyport, Mass. 
O'Connor, D. L., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
O'Connor, F. C, S.J., (N4) 

New York, N. Y. 
O'Grady, Br. Ronald, (S2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
O'Keefe, J. B., (C2) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
O'Leary, G. P., (SI) 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
Olivier, J. L., (S4) 

Arnaudville, La. 
Olivier, J. F., (A2) 

Arnaudville, La. 
Ollinger, W. H., (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ollis, J. M., Jr., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Olney, R. B., (C3) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Olsen, J. A., (Al) 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
O'Malley, T., (S3) 

Chicago, 111. 
O'Neal, J. H., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
O'Neil, J. M., (C4) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
O'Neill, C. E., S.J., (A4) 

New Orleans, La. 
O'Shaughnessy, S., (N2) 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
O'Shea, Br. Brendan (S2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
O'Shee, W. S., Jr., (Si) 

Alexandria, La. 
Outlaw, A. R., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Owens, C. H., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Owens, R., S.J., (A4) 

Folly Beach, S. C. 
Page, T. W., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Parham, J. A., (N3) 

Semmes, Ala. 
Park, M., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Parker, J. C, (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Parker, J. D., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Paton, W. D., Jr., (C2) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Patrick, L. A., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Paulson, O. L., (N2) 

Yazoo City, Miss. 
Pelham, J. C, (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Peresich, E., (C4) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Petit, P. P., (N2) 

Lorman, Miss. 
Pfister, J. E., S.J., (A4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Phillips, A., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Phillips, E. E., (A3) 

Dallas, Texas 
Phillips, W. M., (N2) 

Dallas, Texas 
Picard, A. A., Jr., (SI) 

Worcester, Mass. 
Pichard, G., (S4) 

Tallahassee, Fla. 
Pieper, C. R., Jr., (CI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Pierce, A. E., (N4) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Pocase, V. J., Jr., (CI) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Price, C. O., Jr., (S2) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Prud'homme, T., (N3) 

Pineland, Texas 
Pugh, J. S., (S4) , 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Purdy, Jr., Jr., (Al) 

Birmingham, Ala. 
Rabby, J. W., (S4) 

Coden, Ala. 
Raben, L. W., Jr., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ramsey, L. B., (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Rasp, Br. Sylvester, (S2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Rebstock, D. J., (C2) 

Golden Meadows, La. 



Page Eighty-jour 



Spring Hill College 



Redden, J. J., (N3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Rederscheid, D. J., (C2) 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Redlingshafer, R. A., (CI) 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Rehm, J. E., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Reinhart, E. W., Jr. 

Mobile, Ala. 
Resha, J. J. (CI) 

Birmingham, Ala. 
Revere, J. M., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Reynolds, A. E., Jr., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Richard, L. L., Jr., (Cl) 

Lafayette, La. 
Ring, P. R, Jr., (S3) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Roberts, R. T., (N4) 

Wichita, Kan. 
Robichaux, A., Jr., (C4) 

Thibodaux, La. 
Robichaux, R. T. G., (S3) 

Thibodaux, La. 
Roell, F. E., (C4) 

Jackson, Miss. 
Roell, P. A., (N2) 

Jackson, Miss. 
Rogge, N. J, S.J., (A5) 

New Orleans, La. 
Rookis, L. P., (Nl) 

Birmingham, Ala. 
Ross, D., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Rotner, M., (N4) 

Irvington, Ala. 
Rountree, W. F., Jr., (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Rowe, G. W., (C5) 

Fairhope, Ala. 
Rowley, J. E., (S3) 

Colebrook, Conn. 
Ruiz, M., (Nl) 

Guatemala, C. A. 
Ruscitto, F., (N4) 

Brooklyn, Ala. 
Rushing, L. E., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Rushing, L. V., (Nl) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Russell, L. W., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ryan, G. W., Ill, (C2) 

Forest Hill, N. Y. 
Ryan, J. P., (A2) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Salmon, M. J., (A2) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Sanders, W. D., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sanders, W. G., (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sapp, J. E., (A2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Saunders, C. E., (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Savoie, D. J., (N2) 

Belle Rose, La. 
Savoie, F. H., (S2) 

Belle Rose, La. 
Schafer, J. R., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Schambeau, T. A., Jr., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Schermer, J. W., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Schiro, N., S.J., (A4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Schmidt, J. A., (S3) 

Naperville, 111. 
Schmitt, W. J., S.J., (N4) 

New York, N. Y. 
Schmittdiel, P. C, (C2) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Schneeberger, L. J., (SI) 

Wauwatosa, Wis. 
Schneider, R. M., (N4) 

Fairhope, Ala. 
Schutzman, R. S., (C3) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Schwing, P., (S3) 

New Iberia, La. 
Sellers, J. W., (A4) 

Headland, Ala. 
Severiano-F., L. P., ' (Nl) 

Brazil, S. A. 
Shackelford, H. L., Jr., (Nl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Shackelford, T. B., (N2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Shannon, H. I., Jr., (C2) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Shea, P. F., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Shea, W. C, (A4) 

Chelmsford, Mass. 
Sheffield, E. J., (A2) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Sheldon, J. S. T., (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sherrell, J. T., Jr., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Shine, T. F., (C2) 

Dallas, Teaxs 
Shoulders, J. M., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Shropshire, A. T., Jr., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Siener, G. H., (A2) 

Spartanburg, S. C. 
Simms, J. B., (S4) 

Springfield, Ky. 
Simonetti, J., (SI) 

Birmingham, Ala. 
Simpson, C. R., (Nl) 

Montgomery, Ala. 
Sims, W. T., (C4) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Sindik, M. A., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Singler, J. L., (S3) 

Sandusky, Ohio 
Skidmore, J. R., (S3) 

LaGrange, 111. 
Skivo, A. M., (S2) 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Slaton, H. C, (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Small, M. H. P., Jr., (A2) 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Smith, E. B., Jr., (Cl) 

Madison, N. J. 
Smith, J. F., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Smith, W. P., (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Soonhalter, E. J., (Cl) 

Cleveland Hghts., Ohio 
Soto, P. J., Jr. (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Soule, P. T„ (SI) 

Portsmouth, Va. 
Spanyer, R. M., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Spataro, L. P., (Nl) 

Bossier City, La. 
Speed, C. C, (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Stahl, E. M., (Nl) 

Shreveport, La. 
Stahl, G. J., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Stallone, M. J., (C2) 

Natchez, Miss. 
Stavrakos, H. J., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Steinbach, T., (N2) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Steiner, J. R., (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Stiegler, H., S.J., (A4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Stodder, J. H., (A4) 

Chicago, 111. 
Strachan, G. O., Jr. (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Strickland, D. O., (N2) 

Pensacola, Fla. 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Eighty-five 



Striplin, L. D., (S2) 

Selma, Ala. 
Stubbers, J. C, (S3) 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Suarez, J. W., (S4) 

New York, N. Y. 
Suhrer, S. W., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sullivan, E. M., (N2) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Sullivan, J. F., (N4) 

Norwood, Mass. 
Surratt, J. H., (Al) 

Greenville, S. C. 
Swan, J. L. (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sweeney, J. F., S.J., (A4) 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
Tait, J. E., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Talbert, T. S., Jr., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Talbott, C, (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Tanner, A. D., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Tanner, J. C, (N3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Taylor, H., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Taylor, R., (N2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Taylor, W. H., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Tebo, B. E., (A2) 

Miami, Fla. 
Terrell, C. P., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Terrill, J. D., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Tew, A. S., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Tew, J. T., (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Thomas, J. C, Jr., (C3) 

Aiken, S. C. 
Thomas, R. M., S.J., (A3) 

Seffner, Fla. 



Allen, Wyllowdean 
Alvey, Ann 
Anderson, Clara Effie 
Barclay, Thelma 
Barnes, Rose Marie 
Beckham, Dorothy Ann 
Beckinheuser, Martha 

Page Eighty-six 



Thompson. F. H., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Thompson, P. R., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Tiblier, E. J., S.J., (N4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Tiernan, E. J., (S3) 

Jersey City, N. J. 
Tighe, Br. Donald (S2) 

Daphne, Ala. 
Toler, B. G., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Tonne, R. A., (N4) 

Lombard, 111. 
Toups, Br. David 

Daphne, Ala. 
Tremmel, R. M., (C4) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Tuero, M., Jr., (C3) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Vail, W. L., (Nl) 

Dallas, Texas 
Velasquez, M. J. E., (C2) 

Ciudad Trujillo, D. R. 
Vessels, J. L., S.J., (A4) 

McAllen, Texas 
Vickers, J. T., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Voelker, Br. Alton 

Daphne, Ala. 
Wade, J. B., Jr., (Nl) 

Germantown, Tenn. 
Wagner, D. B., (S2) 

Louisville, Ky. 
Wagner, J. T., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Wakely, T. J., (S2) 

San Antonio, Texas 
Walker, E. L., Jr., (Nl) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Walsh, J. G., (S3) 

Newark, N. J. 
Warren, D. F., (N2) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Warren, G. E., (Si) 

Chicago, 111. 
Waters, P. L., (Nl) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Weathers, H. T., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Part Time Students 

Berry, Bro. Donnan 
Bleir, Mary Lou 
Bourg, Pattie 
Bowers, Bro. Miguel 
Burns, Ada Jesuita 
Calametti, Mary Florence 
Christian, Ava Jean 



Webb, J. A., (S2) 

Helena, Ark. 
Weber, E., (S3) 

Queens, N. Y. 
Welsh, J. R., S.J., (A5) 

Shreveport, La. 
Wessely, E. E., (S3) 

Gadsden, Ala. 
White, C. F., (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Whittington, L. E., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Williams, A. W., Jr., (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Williams, C. C, Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Williams, D. B., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Williams, J. E., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Williams, R. E., Ill, (C3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Willis, C. H., Jr., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Wilson, D. M., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Wilson, H. E., (S2) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Wilson, J. H., Jr., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Wilson, J. P., (N4) 

Pascagoula, Miss. 
Wilson, R. T., (N2) 

Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
Wold, R. G., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Wood, D. H., (A3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Woolsey, J. E., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Yelverton, C. L., (C3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Yon, G. M., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Yon, K. S., Jr., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Zambrano, F., (CI) 

Monterrey, Mex. 



Coate, Audrey 
Coghlan, Alice Betty 
Colcy, Tommie 
Connick, Mary 
Cox, Dolores 
Davis, Marie 
Davis, Marian Irene 



Spring Hill College 



Davis, Nellie Faye 
Denk, Annie 
Dudley, Bob 
England, Evelyn 
Fendley, Betty Jean 
Fore, Audrie June 
Foreman, Evan H. 
Gabelly, Bro. Thaddeus 
Gates, Bobbie 
Giles, Doris 
Goodwin, Alta Faye 
Gray, Joyce Virginia 
Gwin, Helen Frances 
Hammac, Cornelius Joan 
Harrington, Bro. Cyrus 
Harrington, Dorothy Agnes 
Hastings, Doris 
Helton, Rube Lane 
Henderson, Maureen 
Hickson, Mary Frances 
Hurley, Anne 
Hurley, Vera Beatrice 
Hyland, Jessie 
Jackson, Maida 
Johns, Bonnie Mae 



Johnson, Ina 
Johnston, Mildred 
Jones, Heuna 
Joseph, William J. 
Kendrick, Alice Beatrice 
Kotis, Helen Grace 
Kuffskie, Wanda Nadine 
Kuffskie, Wanda N. 
Lewis, Juanita 
Lindsey, Juanita 
Long, Rosalie 
McCutcheon, Dorothy 
McNamara, Rose Patricia 
Malone, Doloroes 
Mazel, Dolores Elsie 
Middleton, Claudie 
Miller, Doris 
Moore, Honor 
Moore, John F., S.J. 
Morris, Ella D. 
Mullen, Bro. Dermat 
Nespor, Edna 
O'Connor, William J. 
Phillips, Mildred 
Poston, Anne Christine 



Pringle, Mary Agnes 
Rabby, Sally Idella 
Rocheleau, Patricia 
Rodriguez, Beatrice 
Rollins, June 
Ross, Ira Merle 
Schwelm, Charlotte 
Shelley, Ann 
Spence, L. D. 
Summers, Betty 
Talbert, Betty Jean 
Tanner, Shirley 
Taylor, Mary Margaret 
Taylor, Willie Grey 
True, Sarah 
Uptagrafft, Myrtie Ruth 
Walker, Barbara 
Weaver, Brunette 
Webb, Jimmie 
Weston, Marie 
White, Pattie Jo 
Whitworth, Bessie 
Williams, Barbara 
Woodward, Minnie 
Wright, Betty Jean 



Summer Session (1949) 



Adams, Thomas 
Albright, R. G., S.J. 
Allen, William O. 
Andrews, John M. 
Antoine, Sara E. 
Averett, Tom R. 
Azar, David A. 
Baggett, Joseph L. 
Bakutis, Bro. Arnold 
Bankhead, Clayton 
Barker, Bro. Lee 
Barrineau, Thomas L 
Beary, Bro. Dean 
Bendillo, Bro. Victor 
Berger, Norman J. 
Berte, John, S.J. 
Bethany, Michael L. 
Bingham, John, S.J. 
Boggan, Sr. Ursula 
Bonin, Maurice 
Bowers, Bro. Miguel 
Bowles, John F. 
Bradley, Francis E., Jr. 
Brady, Bro. Jordan 
Brady, Sr. M. Matthew 
Breazeale, Mrs. Sarah 
Brisolara, Bro. Ashton 
Brou, Bro. Glenn 
Browning, James P. 
Browning, Joseph E., S.J. 
Bunkley, Frank K., Jr. 



Busbee, Jack E. 
Butler, Clerah Colquitt 
Byrd, James C. 
Calametti, John A., Jr. 
Campbell, Bro. Ambrose 
Campbell, Michael Lory 
Cannamela, Romolo 
Carpenter, William B. 
Carter, James C, S.J. 
Caruso, Charles J. 
Chamblin, Stuart A., Jr. 
Champagne, Bro. Norman 
Chavez, John O., S.J. 
Chinery, Bro. Faber 
Ching, Sr. Mary Robert 
Clarke, William A. 
Clayton, C. Murray 
Cloney, Robert D., S.J. 
Cloonan, Bro. Stephen 
Cohen, Harold F., S.J. 
Coleman, Franklin J. 
Colin, Bro. Stanley 
Collier, Mrs. Irma L. 
Cook, Hazel S. 
Cooney, William J. 
Council, James 
Courchesne, John 
Cousins, Ewert, S.J. 
Covan, Mrs. Lula P. 
Cox, Bro. Jogues 
Cox, Miss Zoe Belle 



Crabtree, James, S.J. 
Cratin, Paul D. 
Crawford, William W. 
Creagan, Daniel A., S.J. 
Crenshaw, Mary C. 
Crilly, Sr. M. Marcella 
Cuervo-Braga, Jose 
Culton, Thomas 
Cummins, John F. 
Cutcliff, Sr. Mary Frances 
Daugherty, H. G. 
Davis, Charles H. 
Davis, John A. 
Davis, Fred R. 
Davis, Wallace 
Deakle, Modeste E. 
Dcbrow, Charles L. 
Deeves, John F., S.J. 
Delaney, Sr. Maura 
Demeranville, Samuel 
DeMouy, Martin 
DeRussy, Edward, S.J. 
Devine, John F., S.J. 
Devitt, Bro. Gwyn 
Diez, Charles, Jr. 
Donaghey, Bro. Borgia 
Donahue, F. X., S.J. 
Doolan, William S. 
Donivan, Sr. Mary Aloysia 
d'Ornellas, Marguerite 
d'Ornellas, Virginia 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Eighty-seven 



Doyle, Bro. Walter 
Drago, Arthur C. 
Driscoll, Mrs. Bertie S. 
Dudley, Robert 
Duff, Donald F. 
Dugas, Bro. Juan 
Duffey, Bro. Clarence 
Duncan, James N. 
Durick, Sr. M. Margaret 
Durick, William 
Duvall, Sr. Mary Vera 
Edgar, George 
Edwards, John D. 
English, Viola 
Faget, Bro. Bosco 
Fagot, H. J., S.J. 
Fearn, Joe A. 
Felis, Dorothy C. 
Ferlita, Ernest C. 
Flock, Mary Margaret 
Florez, Albert R. 
Fogel sanger, Walter J., S.J. 
Frederick, Miss Rose 
Freeman, Warren E., S.J. 
Friedlander, Harris 
Gabelly, Bro. Thaddeus 
Gallagher, William B., Jr. 
Galligan, Sr. Eleanor 
Galloway, Clyde E. 
Gaul, Richard J. 
Gavin, Bro. Francis 
Giannatelli, Anita 
Gibbons, Bro. Terence 
Gideon, Richard P., Jr. 
Gilly, S. J., S.J. 
Gillin, Thomas M., S.J. 
Girod, Morton K. 
Gorday, William B. 
Greco, Angelo L., Jr. 
Gunthorpe, Constance C. 
Hack, Mrs. Lucy Clark 
Hall, William M. 
Hamilton, Henry E. 
Haninger, Sr. Marie 
Haskins, Joseph A. 
Hawie, Wadih, Jr. 
Herlong, T. X., S.J. 
Herring, Ernest A. 
Hilburn, Mrs. Juanita 
Holloway, Alvin J., S.J. 
Horstmann, Rudolph, S.J. 
Hough, Mrs. Mamie I. 
Hulcher, Ralph C. 
Hunley, Bro. Denis 
Hurley, Daniel J. 
Irby, Ernest S. 
Jackson, Bro. Alberic 
Jacque, Anthony 
Jagemann, Sr. Virgil Marie 
Jenniskens, Thomas J., S.J. 
Jernigan, Mrs. Jane M. 



Johnson, Earl, S.J. 
Johnson, Paul D. 
Joseph, William F. 
Jung, Bro. Arthur 
Kearney, Sr. M. Immaculata 
Keene, Frank H. 
Kelley, Clyde M. 
Kelly, John J. 
Kelly, Thomas M., S.J. 
Koch, Martin R. 
Koch, Patrick H., S.J. 
Kresse, Joe 
Ladas, Elias H. 
Langan, Marshall J., Jr. 
Larroque, Bro. Lucian 
LaSalle, Al 
Latham, Eldred C. 
Lauten, Ray C, Jr. 
LeBlanc, Clarence J., Jr. 
LeBlanc, Bro. Rene 
Ledet, Bro. Sidney 
Lemmon, Bro. Noel 
Lemoine, Douglas J. 
Lilly, Robert F. 
Lockett, James A., S.J. 
Lorio, Bro. Farrel 
Lund, Robert E. 
Lynch, William R. 
McBride, Wm. H., S.J. 
McCarthy, Paul J., S.J. 
McCauley, Walter C, S.J. 
McDermott, John J. 
McEvoy, Emanuel T., Jr. 
McGeagh, Richard A. 
Mclnerney, Walter J. 
McLemore, Lucille B. 
McLeod, Mrs. Margaret S. 
McLinskey, Bro. Mel 
McMillan, Andrew P. 
McMillan, Joseph M. 
McQuillen, Claude, Jr. 
Macgowan, Evander, S.J. 
MacMurtrie, J. A., S.J. 
Macon, Paul V. 
Madden, Thomas J., S.J. 
Magee, Neil F. 
Mallon, Mrs. Irma N. C. 
Mai oof, Joseph 
Markonic, Eudessa H. 
Martin, James P. 
Mason, Milton M. 
Mason, Walter E. 
Maury, Alice M. 
Mendelson, Bro. Sherwin 
Merrifield, Bro. Douglas 
Messonier, Bro. Rain 
Meyer, Clarence W., Jr. 
Miklic, John A. 
Miller, Charles, S.J. 
Mills, Mrs. Ila B. 
Moan, Francis X., S.J. 



Moccia, Bro. Regis 
Monica, Levi 
Morgan, James T. 
Morris, Ella D. 
Morris, William F. 
Mosley, A. J. 
Moss, Thomas 
Moulder, Mrs. Dora S. 
Mullan, Tobert, S.J. 
Mullen, Bro. Dermot 
Mullins, William I. 
Nee, L., S.J. 
Neuhoff, Sr. Clare 
Nusz, Joseph 

O'Connor, Francis, C, S.J. 
Odom, Mary Elizabeth 
Olivier, John L. 
Ollinger, William H. 
O'Neil, Bro. Clifford 
O'Neil, Patricia Estelle 
O'Neill, Charles E., S.J. 
Outlaw, Arthur 
Owens, Robert, S.J. 
Page, Thomas E. 
Parr, Bro. Joachim 
Partridge, Daniel W., S.J. 
Paton, William 
Patterson, Eula G. 
Peabody, Bro. Evan 
Pfister, J. Emile, S.J. 
Pierce, Arthur 
Pocase, Vincent J., Jr. 
Porcella, Bro. Edwin 
Przytulski, Bro. Sigmund 
Puckett, Angelo Sr., Jr. 
Rabby, John W. 
Ramsey, Lucius B. 
Regan, William M. 
Rehm, John 
Repp, Mrs. Florence C. 
Reynolds, Bro. Neil 
Richard, Bro. Louis-Joseph 
Ridgway, Mrs. Amelia 
Robinson, Theodore 
Rodrique, Bro. Gaspar 
Roussell, Bro. James 
Rowe, Julia W. 
Russell, William J., Jr. 
Sanders, William G. 
San Marco, Salvator J., S.J. 
Schambeau, Tarleton A., Jr. 
Schneider, Robert 
Schroder, John F., S.J. 
Schiro, Nicholas T., S.J. 
Schmitt, William J., S.J. 
Schwartzel, Frank 
Shackelford, Thomas B. 
Sheffield, Edward 
Shirvell, Bro. Raymond 
Spanyer, Robert M. 
Stanley, James F. 



Page Eighty-eight 



Spring Hill College 



Stano, Sr. Mary Nathanael 
Stavrakos, Harry J. 
Staub, E. J., S.J. 
Steinbach, Thomas L. 
Stiegler, Hilliard F., S.J. 
Stephens, Robert J. 
Stodder, Joseph 
Suarez, James W. 
Suhrer, Samuel W. 
Sultenfuss, Gerald A. 
Summerford, Betty 
Sweeney, Joseph, S.J. 
Tanner, Alton D. 
Tait, Elizabeth 
Tarlton, Lois Day 
Taylor, Harvell 
Tew, John T. 



Thigpen, Virginia 
Thomas, Richard M., S.J. 
Thompson, Francis H. 
Thompson, Paul R. 
Thresh, John A. 
Tiblier, Edgar J., S.J. 
Usina, Oscar P., S.J. 
Vessels, John L., S.J. 
Vosburg, Velma Jones 
Waller, Bette Jean 
Walsh, James G. 
Watters, Julian A. 
Weber, Edward 
Watson, Francis 
Weathers, Mrs. Minnie 
Wenzel, Bro. Cyran 
Welsh, John R., S.J. 
Whigham, Bobbie Ann 



Whigham, H. C., Jr. 
White, Charles F. 
Whitehead, Leslie E. 
Whitten, Richard S., Jr. 
Whittington, Lawrence, Jr. 
Wiebelt, Andrew H., S.J. 
Williams, David B. 
Williams, John E. 
Williams, Trixie 
Willis, Claude H., Jr. 
Wilson, J. Pat 
Wilson, Mrs. Nell P. 
Wohlbruck, Bro. Kosta 
Wright, Sara B. 
Yelverton, Calvin L. 
Yon, Keittle S., Jr. 
Zibilich, Bro. Foster 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Eighty-nine 



Summary of Enrollment 



Regular Session — Full Time 
Regular Session — Part Time 

Summer Session, 1949 

Total Gross Enrollment 

Less Duplication 

Total Net Enrollment . 



Number of | 
Students 



670 
96 
327 
1093 
158 
935 



Summary of Full Time Enrollment 



By Class: 

Freshmen 2 1 

Sophomores 175 

Juniors 137 

Seniors 143 

Postgraduates 14 

By Course: 

Arts 80 

Commerce 185 

Natural Sciences 223 

Social Sciences 182 

By Place of Residence: 

Alabama 305 

Arkansas 8 

California 2 

Connecticut 2 

Florida 45 

Georgia 17 

Illinois 25 

Kansas •_ 1 

Kentucky 9 

Louisiana 80 



Maryland 1 

Massachusetts 12 

Michigan 6 

Mississippi 19 

Missouri 1 1 

New Jersey 14 

New Mexico 1 

New York 41 

North Carolina 3 

Ohio 7 

Oklahoma 2 

Pennsylvania 8 

South Carolina 6 

Tennessee 8 

Texas 1 1 

Vermont 1 

Virginia 5 

Washington 1 

Wisconsin 5 

Brazil 1 

Cuba 1 

Dominican Republic 2 

Greece 1 

Guatemala 2 

Mexico 3 

Puerto Rico 4 



Page Ninety 



Spring Hill College 



«S M 






*•••*• 



i 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-FIRST 

ACADEMIC YEAR 




1951-1952 



PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 

MOBILE • SPRING HILL STATION • ALABAMA 



CORPORATE TITLE 

Spring Hill College 

Spring Hill (Mobile Co.) 

Alabama 

ACCREDITED BY 

Alabama State Department of Education 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Board of Regents of the University of the State of New Yor\ 

American Medical Association 

MEMBER OF 

Association of American Colleges 

American Council on Education 

National Catholic Education Association 

American Library Association 

National Council of Independent Schools 

Educational Records Bureau 

American Association for the Advancement of Science 

Jesuit Educational Association 

Alabama Educational Association 



ADMINISTRATION 

AND 

FACULTY 




§0fa<T 



*M*\ 



- s 



TRUSTEES AND GOVERNORS 






TRUSTEES OF THE CORPORATION 

Very Reverend W. Patrick Donnelly, s.j. 

Reverend Sidney A. Tonsmeire, s.j. 

Reverend John A. Cronin, s.j. 

Reverend John A. Gasson, s.j. 

Reverend Andrew C. Smith, s.j. 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

(This board, organized in 1931, is responsible for the supervision 
and administration of the endowment fund for the college.) 



Very Reverend W. Patrick Donnelly, s.j., Chairman ex-officio 

Reverend Joseph M. Walsh, s.j. 

Matthias M. Mahorner, a.m., ll.b., ll.d.* 

David R. Dunlap 

Gordon Smith, sr. 

James C. van Antwerp, b.s. 






♦Deceased, 1950 

Bulletin of Information Page Three 



ADMINISTRATION 



OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE 

Very Reverend W. Patrick Donnelly, s.j., a.m., President 

Reverend Andrew C. Smith, s.j., ph.d., Dean of the College 

Reverend John A. Cronin, s.j., a.m., Treasurer 

Reverend Joseph Michael Paul Walsh, s.j., m.a., Dean of Men 

Louis J. Boudousquie, m.s., Registrar 

OFFICIALS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Mrs. Florence M. Bare, b.s., Dietician 

Alvin Buckhaults, Golf Instructor 

Sergeant First Class Patrick E. Burns, u.s.a., 
Light Weapons NCO, R.O.T.C. 

Norborne R. Clark, jr., a.b., m.a., m.d., Attending Physician 

Reverend Arthur Colkin, s.j., a.b., Director of Intramural Athletics 

William Gardiner, a.b., Director of Athletics and Coach 

Marie Yvonne Jaubert, a.b., m.a., b.l.s., Librarian 

Jean Keller, Assistant to the Registrar 

Mrs. Albert Levet, r.n., Director of the Infirmary 

Paul A. Napolitano, b.s.c, Assistant Athletic Coach 

Sergeant First Class Robert L. Randolph, u.s.a., Supply NCO, R.O.T.C. 

Sergeant First Class Roger L. Reid, u.s.a., Motor NCO, R.O.T.C. 

Reverend John A. Sweeney, s.j., a.b., Student Counsellor 

Sergeant John H. Taylor, u.s.a., Administrative NCO, R.O.T.C. 

Joseph G. Tyrell, a.b., Bursar 

Reverend John T. Walsh, s.j., a.m., Faculty Moderator of Athletics 

Robert J. Zietz, b.s., m.lib., Assistant Librarian 

Page Four Spring Hill College 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



Harold Gurganus Allen, b.s.c, Instructor in Accounting* 
B.S.C., Spring Hill College, 1937. 
Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1946-. 

Arnold J. Benedetto, s.j., ph.d., Assistant Professor of Philosophy and 
Chairman of the Department. 

A.B., St. Louis University, 1937; Ph.D., Gregorian University, 1948. 
Instructor in Classical Languages and History, St. Charles College, 1939-41; Assistant 
Professor of Philosophy, Spring Hill College, 1948-; Chairman, 1950-. 

Samuel M. Betty, m.a., Assistant Professor of Economics* 
B.S.C, Spring Hill, 1939; M.S., Fordham University, 1947. 
Instructor in Economics, Spring Hill College, 1946-48; Assistant Professor, 1948-. 

Joseph S. Bogue, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Gongaza University, 1925; A.M., 1926; Ph.D., Gregorian University, Rome, 1937. 
Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1926-28; Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1928-29; 
Professor, Spring Hill College, 1937-. 

Louis J. Boudousquie, m.s., Registrar, Associate Professor of Drawing and 
Mathematics. 

B.S., Spring Hill, 1917; M.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1936. 
Instructor, McGill Institute, Mobile, 1921-28; Registrar, Spring Hill, 1928-; Instructor, 
1928-36; Associate Professor, 1936-. 

Francis X. Carberry, m.b.a., Associate Professor of Business Administration. 
B.S., Canisius College, 1925; M.B.A., Harvard University, 1928. 

Instructor, Buffalo Collegiate Center, 1933-36; Assistant Professor, Alabama Polytechnic 
Institute, 1936-42; National War Labor Board, 1943-45; Associate Professor, Georgia 
Institute of Technology, 1946-49; Associate Professor, Spring Hill College, 1940-. 

O. L. Chason, b.s., d.p.h., Special Lecturer in Sociology. 

B.S., University of Alabama, 1923; M.D., Tulane, 1925; D.P.H., Harvard, 1934. City 
Health Officer, Mobile, 1934. 

Thomas Hanley Clancy, s.j., a.m., Instructor in Political Science. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1948; M.A., Fordham University, 1951. 
Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1950-. 

Arthur A. Colkin, s.j., a.b., Assistant Professor of History. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1935. 
Instructor in History, Spring Hill College, 1937-41; Assistant Professor of History, 1946-. 

Daniel M. Cronin, s.j., a.m., Professor of Mathematics. 
A.B., St. Louis, 1900; A.M., 1901. 

Instructor, Spring Hill, 1901-03; Jesuit High School, New Orleans, La., 1903-06; 
Associate Professor, Chairman of Department of Mathematics, Spring Hill, 1913-35; 
Spring Hill, 1939-45; Professor, 1946-. 

*On leave for military service. 

Bulletin of Information Page Five 



John A. Cronin, s.j., m.a., Professor of Economics, Chairman of the 
Department. 

B.S.C., Spring Hill, 1929; M.A., St. Louis University, 1937. 

Professor of Economics, Spring Hill, 1937-38, 1943-. Chairman of the Department, 
1943-. 

Armand N. Cuen, b.a., m.a., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

B.A., Texas College College of Mines, 1947; M.A., Texas Western College, 1948. 

Ft. Bliss Language Instructor, 1947; Chavez Academy, 1948; El Paso Public Schools, 

1948-50; Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1950-. 

Eugene R. Curtan, Major, U.S.A., a.b., Assistant Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics. 
A.B., Texas A & M College, 1942. 

Graduate Automotive Maintenance School; Armed Forces Information School; Trans- 
portation School (basic course) and ROTC Indoctrination Course. Assigned Spring Hill 
College, 1950. 

John Vincent Deignan, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Chemistry, Chairman of the 
Department. 

A.B., Woodstock College, 1917; A.M., 1920; Ph.D., Fordham University, 1929. 
Instructor in Chemistry, Spring Hill, 1917-1922; Professor and Chairman, 1929-. 

Louis J. Eisele, s.j., m.s., Assistant Professor of Physics. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1935; M.S., 1940. 

Teaching Fellow, St. Louis University, 1939-40; Instructor in Physics and Mathematics, 
Spring Hill College, 1940-41; Assistant Professor of Physics, 1946-. 

Joseph B. Franckhauser, s.j., a.m., Professor Emeritus of German. 
A.B., Woodstock College, 1900; A.M., 1901. 

Professor, Loyola University of the South, 1912-13; President, St. John's College, 
Shreveport, La., 1927-30; Professor of German, Spring Hill College, 1936-48; Professor 
Emeritus, 1948. 

Warren Eugene Freeman, s.j., a.b., Assistant in English. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1949. 
Assistant in English, 1950. 

William C. Gardiner, a.b., Instructor of Physical Education and Coach, 
Athletic Director. 
A.B., Georgetown University, 1943. 
Athletic Instructor, Washington, D. C, Recreation Department, 1942; Athletic Instructor, 
U. S. Army, 1943-46; Athletic Instructor, and Coach, Spring Hill College, 1946-. 

John A. Gasson, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Philosophy and Psychology, Chair- 
man of the Department of History and Social Sciences. 

A.B., Boston College, 1927; A.M., 1928; Ph.D., Gregorian University, Rome, 1931; 
S.T.L., Weston College, 1934. 

Instructor in History, Latin and Greek, Spring Hill, 1928-30; Professor of Philosophy 
and Psychology, Spring Hill, 1937-. 

Charles C. Goetz, s.j., s.t.l., Assistant Professor of Religion. 
B.S., Spring Hill College, 1938; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1947. 
Instructor in Chemistry, Spring Hill College, 1946-47; Assistant Professor of Religion, 
1948-. 

Lester F. X. Guterl, s.j., m.a., Associate Professor of Education and Chair- 
man of the Department. 

A.B., Villanova College, 1929; M.A., St. Louis University, 1937. 

Assistant Professor, Education and Political Science, Spring Hill College, 1937-39; Dean 
of Men, Assistant Dean of Arts and Sciences, Associate Professor, Religion and Educa- 
tion, Loyola University, 1943-50; Associate Professor of Education, Spring Hill College, 
1951-. 

Page Six Spring Hill College 



Kermit Hart, m.s., (bus. ad.) c.p.a., Special Lecturer in Accounting. 

B.S. (Bus. Ad.), University of Florida, 1927; M.S. (Bus. Ad.), University of Alabama, 
1940; C.P.A. (Alabama). 

Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1928-37; Assistant Professor, 1937-41; Associate Pro- 
fessor, 1941-46; Special Lecturer, 1946-. 

John J. Holden, m.ed., Instructor in History. 

B.S., Ithaca College, 1933; M.Ed., Rutgers University, 1946. 

Educational Adviser, Civilian Conservation Corps, 1934-38; Instructor Middleboro Pub- 
lic Schools, 1939-42; Ordinance Department, War Department, 1942-46; Instructor in 
History, Spring Hill, 1947-. 

John A. Hutchins, s.j., a.m., Professor of French. 

A.B., Woodstock College, 1911; A.M., 1912. 

Instructor, St. Boniface College, Winnipeg, Canada, 1913-16; Jesuit High School, 

1921-22; Spring Hill High School, 1924-27; Professor of French, Spring Hill College, 

1927-. 

James V. Irby, b.s., Instructor in Speech. 
B.S., Spring Hill, 1942. 

Instructor, Army Air Forces, Army Ground Forces, Army Service Forces, 1943-46; 
Instructor, Spring Hill, 1946-. 

Francis L. Janssen, s.j., m.a., Professor of Language and Philosophy, Chair- 
man of the Department of Languages. 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1921; M.A., 1922. 

Professor of Languages, Religion, Philosophy, Spring Hill, 1932-37, 1942-43; Assistant 
Dean, Loyola University, New Orleans, 1937-42; Principal, St. John's High, Shreveport, 
1943-47; Professor of Languages, Religion and Philosophy, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Languages, Spring Hill, 1947-. 

Joseph N. Langan, Special Lecturer in Political Science* 

Member, Alabama State Bar, 1936-; State Representative (Alabama), 1939-43; Graduate, 
Command and General Staff College, U. S. A., 1943; Alabama State Senator, 1947-50; 
Mobile County Commissioner, 1949-50; Member, Alabama State Board of Education, 
1949-; Special Lecturer in Political Science, Spring Hill College, 1949-. 

Everett H. Larguier, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Mathematics and Chairman of 
the Department of Mathematics and Physics. 

A.B., St. Louis University, 1934; M.S., 1936; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1947. 
Teaching Fellow, St. Louis University, 1934-35; Professor of Mathematics and Physics, 
Spring Hill, 1937-38; Assistant, Department of Mathematics, St. Louis University, 
1939-42; Visiting Lecturer in Mathematics, Loyola University, New Orleans, Summer, 
1942; Professor of Mathematics and Chairman of the Department of Mathematics 
and Physics, Spring Hill College, 1947-. 

John A. Leiser, Special Lecturer on Music. 

Certificate, Gunn School of Music, 1927-29; Chicago Musical College, 1929; Juilliard 
School of Music, 1950. 

Music Instructor in various secondary schools, 1933-1950; Special Lecturer on Music, 
Spring Hill College, 1950-. 

Warren J. Martin, s.j., a.m., Special Instructor in Spanish. 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1925; A.M., 1926. 

Instructor, Jesuit High School, Tampa, 1934-44; St. John's, Shreveport, 1944-45; Special 
Instructor, Spring Hill, 1945-. 



*On leave for military service. 

Bulletin of Information Page Seven 



Elmore Patrick Moore, Lt. Col., U.S.A., m.a., Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics, and Chairman of the Department. 
Ph.B., St. Thomas Seminary, 1929; M.A., 1932. 

Graduate, The Infantry School; The Adjutant General School; Command and General 
Staff School; Assigned Spring Hill College, 1950. 

James E. Moore, a.b., ll.b., Special Lecturer in Business Law. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1939; LL.B., University of Alabama, 1948. 
Special Lecturer in Business Law, Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

John Moreau, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Philosophy. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1926; A.M., 1927; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1934; 
Ph.D., Gregorian University, 1938; Mag. Agg., 1938. 
Professor of Philosophy, Spring Hill, 1938-. 

Thomas F. Mulcrone, s.j., m.s., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
B.S., Spring Hill College, 1939; M.S., Catholic University, 1942. 

Instructor in Mathematics, Spring Hill College, 1940-41; 1942-43, Assistant in Mathe- 
matics, St. Louis University, 1944-46; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Spring Hill 
College, 1948-. 

John H. Mullahy, s.j., m.s., Assistant Professor of Biology.** 

A.B., St. Louis University, 1937; M.S., Fordham University, 1942; S.T.L., St. Louis 

University, 1947. 

Instructor in Biology, Spring Hill, 1939-41; Assistant Professor of Biology, Spring Hill, 

1947-. 

Malcolm Patrick Mullen, s.j., ph.d., Associate Professor of Philosophy. 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1928; A.M., 1929; Ph.D., Gregorian University, 1932; 
S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1936. 

Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1929-32; Jesuit High School, New Orleans, Sum- 
mers, 1930-32; Associate Professor, Loyola University, New Orleans, 1937-38; Assistant 
Professor, Spring Hill College, 1939-49; Associate Professor, 1949. 

Raymond Jerome Mullin, s.j., a.m., Assistant Professor of Philosophy and 
Religion. 

LL.B., Brooklyn Law School (St. Lawrence University), 1911; LL.M., 1912; A.B., 
Gonzaga University, 1929; A.M., 1930; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1935. 
Instructor in anguages, Loyola University, 1929-30; Assistant Professor of Religion, 
Philosophy and Sociology, 1940-46; Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion, 
Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

J. Franklin Murray, s.j., a.m., Assistant Professor of English. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1937; A.M., 1942; S.T.L., 1947. 
Instructor in English, Spring Hill College, 1939-40, 1941-42; Assistant Professor, 1946-. 

Joseph Otto Muscat, m.d., Associate Professor of Biology (Part Time). 
M.D., St. Louis University, 1931. 

Paul A. Napolitano, b.s.c, Instructor in Physical Education and Assistant 
Athletic Coach. 
B.S.C, Spring Hill College, 1948. 
Instructor of Physical Education and Assistant Coach, Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

John O'Keefe, s.j., a.m., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1935; A.M., 1939. 

Instructor, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1939-39, 1944-46; Instructor, Spring Hill 
College, 1946-49; Assistant Professor, 1949-. 

**Abscnt on leave. 

Page Eight Spring Hill College 



Eugene T. Regal, a.m., Assistant Professor of Biology. 
A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1933; A.M., 1934. 

Instructor in Biology, Marquette University, 1935-36; Professor of Science, St. Francis 
Seminary, Milwaukee, 1936-39; Instructor in Biology and Director of Intramural 
Athletics and Student Organizations, Milwaukee Public School System, 1939-45; Edica- 
tion Director in charge of Visual Aid and Athletic Programs for Wisconsin Coca-Cola 
Co., 1945-47; Assistant Professor of Biology, Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

Walter Joseph Rhein, s.j., a.m., Assistant Professor of Physics. 
A.B., The Rice Institute, 1936; M.S., Fordham University, 1943. 
Instructor in Physics, Spring Hill College, 1943-45, Assistant Professor, 1950-. 

Hilton L. Rivet, s.j., a.m., Instructor in Sociology. 

A.B., Spring Hill College, 1947; A.M., St. Louis University, 1949. 

Instructor, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, Summer, 1948; Instructor, Spring Hill 

College, 1949-. 

Andrew Cannon Smith, s.j., ph.d., Dean, Professor of English, Chairman 
of the Department. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1923; A.M., Catholic University, 1930; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago, 1934. 

Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1923-24; Assistant Professor of English, Loyola Univer- 
sity of the South, 1931-32; Dean and Professor of English, Spring Hill, 1934-; Chair- 
man of the Department, 1936-. 

Thomas A. Steely, s.j., a.b., Instructor in English. 

A.B., Spring Hill College, 1938; Graduate Studies in St. Louis University School of 

Social Work. 

Assistant in Sociology and German, Spring Hill College, 1948-49; Instructor, 1949-. 

John A. Sweeney, s.j., a.b., Assistant Professor of Religion and Sociology, 
Chairman of the Department of Religion. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1936. 
Instructor, Spring Hill, 1938-41; Assistant Professor and Student Counsellor, 1947-. 

Franklyn H. Sweet, m.s., c.p.a., Professor of Accounting. 
B.S., University of Alabama, 1938; M.S., 1948; C.P.A. (Alabama). 
Assistant Professor of Accounting, University of Alabama, 1946-48; Professor of Account- 
ing, Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

John D. Terrell, Jr., Special Lecturer in Insurance. 

Thames-Jackson-Harris Co., Mobile, Alabama. 

Brother Claver Thomas, s.c., a.b., a.m., Special Lecturer in Mathematics 
and Education. 

A.B., Rutgers University, 1930; A.M., Fordham University, 1946; Cand. Ph.D., 1951. 
Instructor, Sacred Heart Scholasticate, Daphne, 1949-50; Special Lecturer, Spring Hill 
College, 1951-. 

Edwin McKeon Trigg, b.s., Instructor in Chemistry. 
B.S., Spring Hill, 1941. 

Chemist, E. L. DuPont deNemours & Co., 1941-46; Research Assistant, University of 
Chicago, 1944, on assignment from E. I. DuPont deNemours & Co.; Instructor, Spring 
Hill College, 1946-. 

George O. Twellmeyer, s.j., a.b., m.s., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1931; M.S., St. Louis University, 1940. 

Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1938-39; Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Loyola 
University of the South, 1947-49; Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Spring Hill College, 
1950-. 

Bulletin of Information Page Nine 



John T. Walsh, s.j, m.a., Assistant Professor of English. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1939; M.S., Fordham University, 1942. 
Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1941-43; Assistant Professor, 1948-. 

Joseph Michael Paul Walsh, s.j., m.a., Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
and Dean of Men. 

B.S.C., Spring Hill College, 1932; M.A., Gonzaga University, 1938. 
Assistant Principal, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1940-41; Assistant Professor of 
Philosophy, Spring Hill College, 1946-; Dean of Men, 1948-. 

Scott Youree Watson, s.j., ph.d., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

A.B., St. Louis University, 1937; Ph.L., Gregorian University, 1947; Ph.D., 1948. 
Instructor, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1939-41; Instructor, St. Charles College, 
Summers 1940 and 1941; Instructor, Spring Hill College, Summer 1945; Assistant 
Professor of Philosophy, Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

Patrick Henry Yancey, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Biology, Chairman of the 
Department. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1918; A.M., 1919; Ph.D., St. Louis University, 1931. 
Instructor in Biology, Spring Hill, 1919-23; St. Louis University, 1930-31; Professor of 
Biology, Chairman of the Department, 1931-; Member of the Board, National Science 
Foundation, 1950-. 



Page Ten Spring Hill College 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

(1950-1951) 

Admissions and Degrees: 

Mr. Boudousquie, Chairman, Frs.. Deignan, Janssen, Murray and Mr. 
Sweet. 

Curriculum: 

Chairman of the various departments: Fr. Smith {English), Chairman, 
Fr. Benedetto (Philosophy), Fr. J. Cronin (Commerce) , Fr. Deignan (Chem- 
istry), Fr. Gasson (History and Social Sciences), Fr. Guterl (Education), 
Fr. Janssen (Languages), Fr. Larguier (Mathematics and Physics), Col. 
Moore (Military Science and Tactics), Fr. Sweeney (Religion), Fr. Yancey 
(Biology). 

Faculty Ran\ and Tenure: 

Fr. Yancey, Chairman, Frs. Bogue, D. Cronin, Franckhauser, Larguier, 
and Mr. Boudousquie. 

Library: 

Miss Jaubert, Chairman, Frs. Gasson, Larguier, Watson, and Mr. Betty 

Student Welfare: 

Fr. Sweeney, Chairman, Frs. Hutchins, O'Keefe, Joseph Walsh, and 
Messrs. Steely and Rivet. 

Discipline: 

Fr. Joseph Walsh Chairman, Frs. Bogue, Rhein, Smith, and John Walsh. 

Athletics: 

Fr. John Walsh, Chairman, Frs. Colkin, Martin, Messrs. Gardiner and 
Napolitano. 

Publications: 

Fr. Goetz, Chairman, Frs. Murray, Yancey, Messrs. Clancy and Worsham. 

Student Grants: 

Fr. Smith, Chairman, Frs. J. Cronin, Deignan and Goetz. 

Veterans' Affairs and Military Deferment: 

Col. Moore, Chairman, Fr. Mullin, Messrs. Allen, Boudousquie, and 
Tyrrell. 

Public Occasions: 

Mr. Irby, Chairman, Frs. Eisele, Twellmeyer, Messrs. Freeman and 
Holden. 

Recommendations to Medical and Dental Schools: 

Fr. Smith, Chairman, Frs. Deignan, Larguier, Yancey, Messrs. Regal and 
Tri gg- 

Bulletin of Information Page Eleven 



CREDO OF SPRING HILL 



The hope of the future is to mold the mind of youth. Foreign dictator- 
ships sought to perpetuate their shackles through "youth movements." 
American youth is exposed to these poisons which can destroy our hard- 
won liberties. 

Spring Hill College refuses to subscribe to the doctrine that "academic 
freedom" may be used as a pretext to teach systems which destroy all free- 
dom. We proudly boast that it has always taught and always will teach 
the following creed: 

We believe in God 

We believe in the personal dignity of man 

We believe that man has certain rights which come from God 
and not from the State 

We therefore are opposed to all forms of dictatorships which 
hold that the "total man" (totalitarianism) belongs to the State 

We believe in the sanctity of the home — the basic unit of Society 

We believe in the natural right of private property, but like- 
wise that private property has its social obligations 

We believe that Labor has not only rights but obligations 

We believe that Capital has not only rights but obligations 

We are vigorously opposed to all forms of racism — persecution 
or intolerance because of race 

We believe that liberty is a sacred thing, but that law, which 
regulates liberty, is a sacred obligation 

We believe in inculcating all the essential liberties of American 
Democracy and ta\e open and fran\ issue with all brands of 
spurious "democracy!' 

We believe, briefly, in the teachings of Christ, who held that morality 
must regulate the personal, family, economic, political and international life 
of men if civilization is to endure. 

Page Twelve Spring Hill College 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE CHAPEL 




MOBILE 
HALL 




YENNI 
HALL 




THOMAS 

BYRNE 

MEMORIAL 

LIBRARY 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

AND 

REGULATIONS 




GENERAL INFORMATION 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 

The first bishop of Mobile, the Right Reverend Michael Portier, 
D.D., laid the cornerstone of the first building of Spring Hill Col- 
lege on July 4, 1830. It stood on the site of the present Administra- 
tion Building and was opened for classes in November, 1831. Five 
years later, the Governor of Alabama signed the legislative bill 
which chartered the Bishop's seminary-college and gave it "full 
power to grant or confer such degree or degrees in the arts and 
sciences, or in any art or science ... as are usually granted or con- 
ferred by other seminaries of learning in the United States." This 
power was used in the following year, 1837, when four graduates 
received their degrees. Spring Hill thus takes its place among the 
three oldest colleges in the South, while of Jesuit Boarding Colleges, 
it is the oldest after Georgetown. 

As the years went on and the college enrollment rose from thirty 
to more than a hundred, the Bishop found it more and more dif- 
ficult to provide from the limited personnel of his missionary clergy 
the necessary minimum of priest-teachers and administrators. The 
first two Presidents of Spring Hill were called away to be Bishops, 
one to Dubuque (Bishop Loras), the other to Vincennes (Bishop 
Bazin), and the third, Father Mauvernay died after a very brief 
term of office. Reluctantly, Bishop Portier was compelled to trans- 
fer his college to a newly arrived French Congregation, the Fathers 
of Mercy. With little or no experience in teaching, these zealous 
missionaries found the direction of Spring Hill a thankless task 
and gave it up after two years. A similar experiment with the 
Eudists succeeded no better, and in 1845 the College suspended 
operations, pending some new arrangement. 

In this crisis the Lyons province of the Society of Jesus was per- 
suaded to take over Spring Hill, and the new regime was inaugu- 
rated with Father Francis Gautrelet, S.J., as President, in Septem- 
ber, 1847. Since that time through many vicissitudes, the Jesuit 
Fathers have directed the policies of the college and endeavored 
to make a center of liberal culture. During the Civil War, studies 

Bulletin of Information Page Fifteen 



continued without interruption, but a costly fire in 1869 destroyed 
the main building and required the removal of students and faculty 
to St. Charles College, Grand Coteau, Louisiana. Through the 
generous aid of many friends, particularly Bishop Quinlan, "the 
second founder," a new building rose on the site of the old, and 
the new Spring Hill opened its doors. 

Until 1921 the High School and College Departments were not 
perfectly separate in organization and faculty, but after that date, 
a more clear-cut division was noticeable. Within a few years new 
buildings arose on the western side of the campus, and thither the 
college removed for classes and recreation. With the close of the 
term in 1935, the High School department was discontinued, and 
the whole plant thus given over to the needs of the college* 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The College Campus occupies some 700 acres of the elevation 
which gives its name to this residential suburb of Mobile. The 
city and bay are both visible from the hill and easily accessible 
either by bus line or by the famous Old Shell Road, which passes 
the college gates. The village of Spring Hill has a post office, but 
no railroad station. The prospective student or visitor will there- 
fore come first to Mobile, a beautiful city of the Old South, now 
nationally famous for its Azalea Trail. 

Spring Hill is on the Azalea Trail, just six miles from the center 
of the city. The natural beauty of its well-chosen site, adorned with 
an almost endless variety of trees and shrubs and flowers, its lake, 
its shaded avenues, and the striking setting of its athletic fields and 
its buildings make the campus one of the most attractive in the 
United States. 

Owing to its altitude and the invigorating influence of its 
resinous pines upon the surrounding atmosphere, Spring Hill holds 
one of the best records for health in the country. The air is pure 
and bracing, and even in the hottest summer months, the tempera- 
ture, thanks to the nearby Gulf, is usually several degrees lower 
than in the neighboring city. The mildness of the climate all the 
year round makes it possible for outdoor sports to continue with- 
out interruption. 

The Administration Building stands on the site of the first 
building which Bishop Portier erected for his pioneer college. The 

*Those interested in the full story of the first hundred years of Spring Hill should read 
M. Kenny, S.J., The Torch on the Hill (Centenary History of Spring Hill College) Spring 
Hill College, Spring Hill, Alabama. 

Page Sixteen Spring Hill College 



present plant, erected partly in 1869, partly in 1909, to replace the 
damage caused by historic fires, is a brick structure several hundred 
feet in length and three stories high. Covered Spanish colonnades 
join it to the Dining Hall on the west, the Infirmary on the east, 
and the Chapel on the north. The building itself is occupied by 
the Faculty and the administrative offices. Class rooms are also 
located in this building. 

The Infirmary Building is the only building in present use 
which antedates the fire of 1869. On the first floor is located the 
pharmacy under the charge of a registered nurse; and the rooms 
on the second floor are equipped to take care of all ordinary cases 
of illness. 

The Refectory Building across the quadrangle from the In- 
firmary contains the dining halls for faculty and students. The 
faculty hall upstairs is brightened by the painting which Napoleon's 
uncle, Cardinal Fesch, presented to his friend Bishop Portier for 
his new college. The students' dining hall is on the lower floor. 

The College Chapel, dedicated to the Patron of the College, 
St. Joseph, was built in 1910. It is modified Gothic in style, and 
beautifully appointed within. 

Yenni Hall, erected and named in memory of Father Dominic 
Yenni, S.J., Professor of Latin and Greek at Spring Hill for over 
fifty years, and author of Yenni's Latin and Greek Grammars, is 
entirely devoted to Science. Here are installed on different floors 
the Physics, Chemistry, and Biology lecture rooms and laboratories, 
and the Seismographic Station. 

The Thomas Byrne Memorial Library, the newest building 
on the campus is the gift of Mrs. Byrne in memory of her husband 
and son. It was completed in 1930. It has room for 150,000 volumes. 
The general reading room is large enough to accommodate 100 
students at one time. There are besides smaller rooms for research 
and conference, and one large lecture room. A special section of 
the building contains the Lavretta Library, donated by Mr. L. C. 
Lavretta, a Mobile Alumnus. 

The College Inn is a recreation center midway between the 
golf course and Mobile Hall. Recently redecorated, it contains a 
lounge, a little theatre, dance hall and fraternity meeting rooms. 

The Gymnasium is located in a building just west of the Dining 
Hall. It contains a basketball court, locker rooms, and showers. 

Quinlan Hall is the name given to the long corridor of rooms, 
built over the Gymnasium - Auditorium Building in 1916, and 

Bulletin of Information Page Seventeen 



named in honor of Spring Hill's second founder, Bishop Quinlan. 
There are 40 living rooms in the building, each equipped with 
clothes-press and lavatory. 

Mobile Hall is the largest dormitory building. Dedicated 
November 6, 1927, it gave a new center to the college campus. 
Built on modern lines and with ample provision for the future 
growth of the college, it has space and equipment for housing over 
100 students. Currently some of the rooms on the first floor have 
been arranged as offices and classrooms. The living room in this 
building are bright and airy, and provided with every modern 
convenience. 

Cummings Hall and Kenny Hall, named respectively for a 
deceased President and Dean of the College, Father Edward 
Cummings, and for its historian and long-time Philosophy Profes- 
sor, the late Father Michael Kenny, are temporary dormitory build- 
ing erected with the help of the FWA to house Veterans. 

Other campus buildings include the Sodality Chapel, a campus 
landmark recently renovated, an Animal House for biology de- 
partment material and the Chemistry Annex containing laboratory 
space for freshman chemistry classes. 



Page Eighteen Spring Hill College 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND 
EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

The College requires for admission the satisfactory completion 
of a four year course in a secondary school approved by a recog- 
nized accrediting agency. All candidates for admission to Fresh- 
man year must present sixteen units in acceptable subjects. A unit 
represents a year's study in any subject, constituting approximately 
a quarter of a full year's work. This definition of a unit takes the 
four-year high school as a basis and assumes that the length of the 
school year is from thirty-six to forty weeks, that a period is from 
forty-five to sixty minutes in length, and that the study is pursued 
for four or five periods a week. Candidates are admitted either by 
certificate or by examination. 

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE 

Admission unconditionally by certificate is granted applicants from ap- 
proved secondary schools provided: (1) their 16 high school units include 
12 of strictly academic nature (i.e., English, Mathematics, Languages, His- 
tory, Natural Science, Social Science), and specifically such as correlate in 
the opinion of the Board of Admission with the course which the candidates 
intend to pursue; (2) that the student's rank in his high school class be bet- 
ter than that of the lowest quartile or alternatively, that more than half of 
his grades be better than D; and (3) that there is satisfactory evidence of 
personal character and other qualities deemed requisite by the College for 
desirable students. 

Students from countries where the English language is not the vernacular 
are required to have a sufficient mastery of the English language to enable 
them to follow class lectures without difficulty. No special classes in English 
will be provided by the college for these students. 

Blank forms of entrance certificates which are to be used in every case 
may be had on application to the Registrar. Certificates must be made out 
and signed by the Principal, or other recognized officer of the secondary 
school, and sent by him directly to the Registrar. Such certificates upon sub- 
mission become the property of the College, whether the applicant is ac- 
cepted or not. 

ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 

Applicants, who are not entitled to admission by certificate, may with 
permission of the Board of Admissions take examinations for admission. 
These examinations are held during the first week of September. Appli- 

Bulletin of Information Page Nineteen 






cants who are rejected for reasons of character or academic ranking are not 
eligible for these examinations. 

ADMISSION ON PROBATION 

Upon special recommendation of their Principal, graduates of four year 
non-accredited high schools will be admitted without examination on pro- 
bation for their first semester, provided they fully satisfy the quantitative 
and qualitative entrance requirements enumerated above. Admission on pro- 
bation, but with a limited schedule, may also be granted by the Board of 
Admisssions to students who though otherwise acceptable are ranked in the 
lowest quartile of their high school class, provided there is additional evi- 
dence of seriousness of purpose and reasonable prospect of success in college. 
Students on probation are liable to dismissal for poor scholarship at the end 
of the semester unless they pass every subject in their limited schedule. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Students applying for admission from other institutions of collegiate rank 
will be given advanced standing provided the courses taken are considered 
comparable to those given at Spring Hill. In the evaluation of previous work, 
no credit will be accepted for work done with less than a C average for the 
year. The transfer student must also present an honorable dismissal from 
the last institution attended. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Mature and earnest students who either are lacking in the required units 
or wish to pursue particular studies without reference to graduation, may 
be admitted by the permission of the Dean to such courses of their own 
choice as they seem qualified to take. The work done by these students can- 
not be counted later on toward a degree unless all entrance requirements 
have been satisfied. 

PART-TIME COURSES 

For the convenience of teachers and others who have satisfied the require- 
ments of college entrance, the College offers special courses in college sub- 
jects leading to the various bachelor degrees. Students who have not satisfied 
the requirements for college entrance also may enroll in these courses for the 
cultural value and general information to be gained thereby, but credit will 
not be granted until the proper entrance credentials have been approved and 
filed. 

This part-time work is offered in Summer Session, in a Saturday morn- 
ing course, and in Special Courses for Nurses. 

Summer Session 

The Summer Session runs for six weeks for a maximum of eight semester 
hours. The bulletin of this session is published in April. The dates of sum- 
mer session are announced in the calendar. 

Saturday Courses 

On Saturdays from 8:30 to 12:30 courses are given on the college campus 
during a full year of thirty-four weeks. The length of the periods is so ar- 

Page Twenty Spring Hill College 



ranged that students may gain three semester hours credit in a subject by 
taking it through the year, or by taking a double period through the semester. 
The maximum number of credits is nine for the year's work. The tuition is 
$7.50 per semester hour. 

Nurses Courses 

For the student nurses of the Nursing Schools of City Hospital and Provi- 
dence Hospital of Mobile, special courses are offered in Biology, Chemistry, 
Philosophy, Psychology, Religion and Sociology. By special arrangement 
these courses are also open to other qualified students on a part-time basis. 

The Nurses' courses begin the fourth Monday in September and continue 
through the year till the third Saturday in May, with the usual holidays in- 
dicated in the College Calendar. 

STATEMENT OF THE OBJECTIVES 

Ultimate Objectives 

As a Jesuit Liberal Art College, Spring Hill has the same pri- 
mary purpose as the Catholic educational system taken in its en- 
tirety. This is best expressed in the words of Pope Pius XI: "The 
proper and immediate end of Christian education is to cooperate 
with divine grace in forming the true and perfect Christian, that 
is, to form Christ Himself in those regenerated by baptism . . . The 
true Christian, product of Christian education, is the supernatural 
man who thinks, judges and acts constantly and consistently in 
accordance with right reason, illuminated by the supernatural light 
of the example and teaching of Christ; in other words, to use the 
current term, the true and finished men of character." 

Immediate Objectives 

It is in terms of this end that the Jesuit College of Liberal Arts 
conceives its special function in contemporary American life. Obvi- 
ously, then, it will not neglect the field of religion. Instruction in 
Catholic faith and morals will always be a part of its task. But it 
is not the whole. The Jesuit college by its traditions can never be 
content with simply presenting Catholicism as a creed, a code or 
a cult. It must strive to communicate the riches of Catholicism as 
a culture, thus giving the modern man a coign of vantage whence 
to view with understanding not merely the facts in the natural 
order, but those in the supernatural order also, those facts which 
give meaning and coherence to the whole life. 

Jesuit education regards the college of liberal arts as the heart 
of its system. It is through the instrumentality of such colleges 
that Catholic leaders will be formed, men and women who have 
been trained spiritually and intellectually in the Catholic sense, who 

Bulletin of Information Page Twenty-one 



have intelligent and appreciative contact with Catholicism as a 
culture, who through their general education in the college of arts 
have so developed their powers of mind and heart and will that 
they can take an active part in the service of Church and society. 

The Jesuit college in its teaching aims at reaching the whole 
man, his intellect, his will, his emotions, his senses, his imagination, 
his aesthetic sensibilities, his memory, and his powers of expression. 
It seeks to lift up man's whole being to that broad, spiritual out- 
look on life whereby he not only understands and appreciates the 
fact that our entire social heritage is bound up with the Truth, 
Goodness and Beauty of God as seen in Revelation, Nature, Art, 
and Language, but is likewise willing and ready to become identi- 
fied with those activities, individual as well as collective, that make 
for the sanctif ication of the individual and the betterment of society. 

The Jesuit college strives to provide a broad foundation in gen- 
eral education, upon which advanced study in a special field may 
be built. 
Vocational Objectives 

In addition to these objectives held in common with all Jesuit colleges, 
Spring Hill aims by proper direction in the choice of elective studies to pre- 
pare her graduates for successful work in professional schools, in business, 
and in teaching. 

Specific Objectives of the Various Academic Degrees 

The objective of the Arts (A.B.) degree or curriculum is to give a bal- 
anced cultural education as a foundation for full living. This objective is 
to be attained through the humanistic and philosophic disciplines, supple- 
mented by training in scientific and mathematical thinking, the entire cur- 
riculum to be integrated by acquaintance with the social and religious factors 
that have entered into the making of Western civilization, and that con- 
tribute to the solution of contemporary problems. 

The objective of the Science (B.S.) degree or curriculum is to give by 
means of natural sciences, or social sciences, a thorough training in the 
scientific method as a basis of sound scientific thinking, balanced by cul- 
tural training in language, literature and history, and correlated as intimately 
as possible with scholastic philosophy. 

The objective of the Commerce (B.S.C.) degree or curriculum is to give 
a systematic and balanced training in the problems and principles of business 
administration with specialization in one of three fields related to the world 
of commerce, supplemented by cultural work in language, history and scho- 
lastic philosophy. 

Objectives of Pre-professional Curricula 

The Pre-Legal Course prepares the student for admission to various 
recognized Law Schools of the United States by three years of degree work, 
v/ith emphasis on the social sciences. 

Page Twenty-two Spring Hill College 



The Pre-Medical Course enables the students to fulfill the entrance re- 
quirements of the various Class A Medical Schools taking three years of 
degree work with emphasis on the pre-medical sciences. 

The Pre-Dental Course in three years qualifies the student for admis- 
sion to various Class A Dental Schools. The curriculum is much the same 
as that of the pre-medical course. 

The Engineering Course supplies the mathematical deficiencies of the 
beginning engineering student and gives him at least the first year of basic 
engineering, common to all engineering curricula. To finish his course the 
student must transfer after one or two years to a fully accredited Engineer- 
ing School. 

The Nursing Course, while preparing the nursing students of the City 
Hospital and Providence Hospital of Mobile for their diplomas as Registered 
Nurses, gives them two years of accredited courses towards a Bachelors' de- 
gree in Nursing Education. 



Bulletin of Information Page Twenty-three 



THE GOVERNMENT AND THE WELFARE 
OF THE STUDENTS 



THE DISCIPLINE 

Spring Hill is committed to the belief that a system of education which 
discounts the formation of character is pernicious. For this reason oppor- 
tunity is given to learn the important lesson of obedience to salutary laws 
and restraints. Everywhere necessary for ordered living, discipline is impera- 
tive when restless youths are forming a community of their own, as they 
do in a boarding school. Whatever the age of the students, and their opinion 
of their abilities to shape their own lives, the authorities of the school feel 
for their charges the responsibility of a parent. Rules are therefore made gov- 
erning the out-of-class life of the students, particularly their social activities 
and absences from the campus. These rules and the sanctions for their ob- 
servance are made known to the student from the beginning. Their enforce- 
ment, while considerate, is unflinchingly firm. Campus discipline is admin- 
istered through the office of the Dean of Men. 

DISCIPLINARY PENALTIES 

Naturally, in addition to minor breaches of college discipline, there occur 
at times serious offenses which require drastic punishment, even suspension 
or dismissal from college. Such are: serious insubordination, repeated vio- 
lation of regulations, neglect of studies, possession or use of intoxicating 
liquors; habitual use of obscene or profane language, and in general any 
serious forms of immorality. In cases of the suspension or dismissal of a 
student for such reason the tuition fee is not refunded. 

Without committing any overt act of the kind described in the preceding 
paragraph, a student may at times by constant and ill-founded criticism, or 
an habitual attitude of opposition to the college government become an un- 
desirable member of the community. For such cases the college reserves the 
right to request any student to withdraw from school, with, however, an 
honorable dismissal, and the refund of such fees as may be refundable by the 
treasurer's regultions. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE OF STUDENTS 

The College is a Catholic institution intended primarily for Catholic 
students, but it does not exclude those of other religious beliefs who may 
wish to take advantage of its system of education. As a rule about 25 per 
cent of the whole student body, and about 5 per cent of the boarding stu- 
dents are non-Catholic. Special courses in religion are provided for non- 
Catholics to replace the required courses in Catholic religion. They are per- 
mitted and encouraged to attend their own religious obligations on Sunday. 
By exception they are expected and required to assist as a part of the student 
body at the collegiate chapel services listed in the annual College Calendar. 

Page Twenty-jour Spring Hill College 



The Catholic students are given every opportunity to learn their religion 
in theory and in practice. A graded course in Religion is offered, running 
through four years, and all Catholics are obliged to register for these courses. 
Credits are given for the courses and required for graduation. 

Week-day Mass is required of all Catholic boarding students. Frequent, 
even daily, Communion is encouraged and quite generally practiced. Special 
devotions are practiced towards the Sacred Heart on the first Friday of the 
month, and towards the Blessed Virgin Mary during the months of October 
and May. A wonderful occasion of grace for many is the annual three-day 
Retreat given in the first semester and obligatory on all Catholic students, 
boarders and day scholars alike. The day scholars will be charged a nomi- 
nal fee for board and lodging during the three days of the exercises. 

One of the Fathers on the faculty is appointed as counsellor or advisor 
of the students. His principal duty is to direct the spiritual activities of the 
college and the various religious societies and sodalities, in regard to which 
he exercises much the same supervision as the Dean of Men exercises in his 
department. 

veterans' education 

The College is approved for the education of Veterans under the GI Bill 
of Rights and Public Law 16. Accordingly it is the policy of the school to 
afford these men every opportunity for study compatible with their educa- 
tional background and the scope of the institution. 

Full credit will be given for courses and training completed in military 
service. In this matter the college will be guided by the American Council 
on Education in its publication entitled, Guide to the Evaluation of Educa- 
tional Experiences in the Armed Services. 

Special guidance is provided for the veterans and special facilities are 
offered for their admission by examination when their high school course 
was interrupted by war service. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

As college education is accomplished not only during the hours of class 
but also in no small degree during the students' interchange of ideas at other 
periods, the College heartily encourages all student organizations which help 
to develop in the student initiative, self-reliance and leadership in organized 
religious and social movements, qualities which are expected of college men 
generally. 

PRINCIPAL STUDENT GROUPS 

Student Council 

This is the co-ordinating group for all the campus organizations. Repre- 
sentation on the council is enjoyed by all the recognized clubs. The President 
of the Council is elected by the student-body and represents them in all 
petitions to the faculty. 

Sodality of the Immaculate Conception 

The Sodality began its work at Spring Hill in 1847 and has never ceased 
to represent the loyalty of the students to the Mother of God. Regular meet- 
ings are held, and various works of zeal and charity undertaken under the 

Bulletin of Information Page Twenty-five 



sponsorship of this organization. Closely connected with the Sodality are the 
Apostleship of Prayer, and the St. John Berchmans Sanctuary Society, the one 
fostering the ideal of reparation, and the other the liturgical movement. 

Alpha Sigma Nu 

This is the Jesuit Honor Fraternity open to those holding highest academic 
rank in the Senior class. 

Portier Debating Academy 

The purpose of this organization, named for the founder of the college, 
is to foster forensics. From its ranks the intercollegiate debating team is 
usually chosen. 

The Yenni Dramatic Society 

This society, an offshoot of the Portier in 1935, aims to develop a practical 
interest in the drama. 
Beta Beta Beta 

This national fraternity in biology has a very active chapter at Spring Hill. 
Meetings are held twice a month, with guest speakers a frequent attraction. 
The Mendelian is published monthly by the group. 

International Relations Club 

The Carnegie Endownment for International Peace approved in 1940 the 
opening of this campus club at Spring Hill. The purpose of its monthly 
meetings is to enlighten student opinion on world affairs. A special library 
is maintained. 

Philomelic Academy 

This youngest organization on the Spring Hill campus is devoted to the 
study and appreciation of classical as well as modern music masters. Its 
meetings and auditions are open to the public. 

Publications 

In normal times the students publish, under faculty supervision, the fol- 
lowing publications: 

The Springhillian, the fortnightly newspaper of campus activities and 
opinions. 

The Motley, a literary magazine. 

The Spring Hill S Book, a Manual for Freshmen. 

ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

In intercollegiate athletic competition, Spring Hill is a member of the 
newly-formed Gulf States Conference, composed of colleges in Louisiana, 
Mississippi and Alabama and its athletic teams engage those of other col- 
leges in basketball, baseball, tennis and golf. 

Intramural sports play an adequate part in the extra-curricular life of 
the student body at Spring Hill. Facilities for various seasonal intramural 
sports are available on the campus. Conducted on an optional basis, the 
teams represent various student groups in touch-football, basketball and soft- 
ball. Off-campus intramural athletics include among others, a bowling league. 
Trophies are provided for the winners in the various intramural sports. 

Tennis courts, an eighteen-hole golf course and a large spring-fed lake 
are other facilities offered for student participation in athletic activity. 

Page Twenty-six Spring Hill College 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



SESSIONS 

The school year begins in the middle of September and ends in the be- 
ginning of June. The year is divided into two semesters of sessions of 
eighteen weeks each. The first semester ends during the last week of Jan- 
uary. The second begins immediately thereafter, without mid-year holidays. 

ATTENDANCE 

Since the purpose of college education is not only to impart information 
and develop the mental faculties, but also, if not chiefly, to train the student 
in habits of punctuality and fidelity to duty, prompt attendance at all class 
meetings is constantly stressed, and the co-operation of parents and guardians 
in this important matter is earnestly requested. The date of registration and 
the limits of the various holiday periods are clearly stated in this catalogue, 
and will be strictly adhered to. 

Although for grave reasons the Dean may grant an excuse from class at- 
tendance, the responsibility for seeing to it that unauthorized absences from 
class meetings do not exceed the tolerated maximum rests directly on the in- 
dividual student (the tolerated maximum equals the number of class meetings 
per week of the course). The penalty for excessive absence in any course is 
cancellation of the student's registration in that course, and accordingly no 
credit will be given for the course. In special cases the delinquent may be 
reinstated by the Committee on Appeals upon written petition of the student. 
Absences immediately preceding and following holiday periods count triple. 

Failure in prompt attendance is regarded as a partial absence or total 
absence, if in excess of ten minutes. Two partial absences will be equivalent 
to one absence. No absences from laboratory periods are excused and missed 
laboratory work must be done at the convenience of the instructor. These 
extra laboratory periods are subject to special fee (see Fees and Expenses). 

AMOUNT OF WORK 

The unit for computing the amount of a student's work is the semester 
hour, which is defined as approximately one hour of class lecture, recitation 
or demonstration per week for a semester. Two hours of preparation by the 
student for each class hour is presumed. Laboratory periods are double. In 
general, one semester hour represents for the average student ordinarily about 
three hours of actual work each week throughout one semester, divided ap- 
propriately between lecture or laboratory periods and out-of-class preparation. 
A normal student load is about seventeen hours per week and no candidate 
for a degree will be allowed to register for fewer than twelve hours; unusual 
programs need special approval of the Dean for completion of registration. 

Bulletin of Information Page Twenty-seven 



EXAMINATIONS AND GRADES 

Final examinations are held in all courses at the end of each semester. 
Student grades in various courses are determined by these examinations to- 
gether with all intra-semestral recitations, quizzes and tests. Missed exami- 
nations, with or without justifying excuse, must be taken eventually. 

The following system of grading is used. Each semester hour of credit 
is valued as follows: 

A excellent, with 3 quality points per hour of credit. 

B good, with 2 quality points per hour of credit. 

C fair, with 1 quality point per hour of credit. 

D deficient, but passed without quality points. 

E not passed, but entitled to re-examination for passing grade. 

F failed without right to re-examination. 

The student should note that the grade D, although passing, indicates 
unsatisfactory wor\. 

A grade of E may be incurred for deficiency in recitations, quizzes, exami- 
nations or other assigned work. Deficiency in examinations is removable by 
supplementary examination, subject to fee payable in advance, to be admin-? 
istered on dates set by the Dean; failing to register for these supplementary 
examinations upon official publication of schedule by the Dean's office the 
student waives his right to re-examination. Successful completion of supple- 
mentary examination entides the student to a grade of D only. Deficiency due 
to failure to complete assigned work may be removed by making up the re- 
quired work. This ordinarily entails a fine of one dollar and, where labora- 
tory work is required, the additional fees for make-up laboratory periods. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION AND SUSPENSION 

Failure to pass at least three courses in any semester renders a student 
liable to dismissal for poor scholarship. Exception to this rule is made only 
for weighty reasons. 

Low grades and neglect of work within the semester render a student 
liable to probation, including exclusion from extra-curricular activities; and 
failure to improve will entail reduction of schedule with a permanent record 
of failure in the subject cancelled. 

A test in proficiency in English will be given all Sophomores. Should any 
prove unsatisfactory, they will be required to take a course in remedial Eng- 
lish. Passing this course by the beginning of their last semester is a condi- 
tion of graduation. 

STUDENT RANKING 

Those students are ranked as Sophomores who have at least twenty-four 
credit hours and points and have completed the prescribed courses of Fresh- 
man year; Juniors, those who have fifty-six credits and points and have com- 
pleted the prescribed courses of the Sophomore year; Seniors, those who have ! 
ninety-two credit hours and points and have completed the prescribed courses 
of the Junior year. 

REPORTS 

At least four times a year, i.e., in November, January, April and July de- 
tailed reports of scholarship and conduct are issued from the Dean's office. 

Page Twenty-eight Spring Hill College 



At other times also similar reports will be furnished to interested parents or 
guardians upon request. 

WITHDRAWAL 

Students who for any reason withdraw from college during the semester 
must give previous notice to the Registrar. Failure to do this within reason- 
able time will incur forfeiture of right to an honorable dismissal. 

TRANSCRIPT OF RECORD 

Students wishing transcript of records in order to transfer from this col- 
lege to another, or for any other purpose, should make early and seasonable 
application for the same. No statements will be made out during the busy 
periods of examinations and registrations. The first transcript of record is 
furnished free. For each additional copy there is a charge of one dollar. 

ADMISSION TO CONCENTRATION 

Toward the end of his sophomore year each student is to elect a subject 
for his major concentration. This election, however, is to be made only after 
consultation with the academic adviser. Students may be admitted to any 
program of concentration that they desire, provided they have completed 
with a C grade or better all the prerequisities to their chosen department 
of concentration. Exceptions to this will be rare and will be made only with 
the consent of the Dean and the chairman of the department concerned. 






Bulletin of Information Page Twenty-nine 



PROGRAMS OF CURRICULA 



Although there are students who, when they enter college, have not made 
up their minds with any degree of certainty as to the career that they in- 
tend to follow, this does not mean that even their program cannot be con- 
structive. In any instance the directing principle of a well-planned program 
of studies should not be chiefly vocational. A student who intends to study 
medicine will naturally see that he includes all those subjects which the medi- 
cal schools require for admission, but in addition he should not forget that 
a good doctor must also be a good human being and that he needs besides 
his specialized medical knowledge a wide range of interests and cultivated 
tastes. The best medical schools prefer candidates who have not had a nar- 
rowly specialized training in college. Similarly, a student who is planning 
to go into law or engineering should not try to limit himself in college to 
subjects which appear to be immediately contributory to legal or engineering 
studies. A student, when making his choice of program, must realize that 
presumably he has before himself a lifetime of necessary specialization, but 
only three or four years of freedom in which to study the interrelation of 
ideas and knowledge, to broaden his intellectual interest and human sympa- 
thies, to fit himself to take his part as an intelligent man in the social, eco- 
nomic, political and religious order that lies ahead of him. 

The ideal college education should prepare a man to live — physically, men- 
tally and spiritually — up to his fullest capacity, to cooperate with and under- 
stand other men while still preserving the integrity of his own individual 
character, to establish for himself the standards of thinking and conduct which 
shall give directions to all this activities, to see new possibilities in existing 
conditions of life and to adapt himself to other conditions in which he may 
find himself in the future. An education so conceived is what is called a 
liberal education as opposed to an education restricted to vocational training. 
In a liberal education mathematics and the sciences, literature and the other 
arts, history, philosophy and religion are studied as means to liberalizing the 
human spirit, to freeing a man from the narrowing restrictions of a single 
environment and the single age in which he lives. An adequate knowledge 
of the past is our only means of acquiring the necessary experience with 
which to meet the future. Such an education as is described here can pre- 
pare a man adequately for the privileges and the responsibilities of citizen- 
ship in the world of today. 

The programs of curricula listed below are designed to assist the student 
in the achievement of the goals outlined above. For convenience of reference 
these programs of curricula are listed in some detail. Numbers in parentheses 

Page Thirty Spring Hill College 



indicate semester hours of credit required in various subjects. Special atten- 
tion is called to the following requirement, applicable in all instances where 
modern language study is part of the curriculum. 

Those who ta\e an Elementary Modern Language in Freshman year are 
obliged to continue the same language in Sophomore year; the degree re- 
quirement is successful passing of a reading test given after the Intermediate 
course. 

ACADEMIC CURRICULA 

Arts Course (A.B.) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Latin (4), Greek or Modern Language (3), English (3), Mathematics 
(3), Science (4), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Latin (4), Greek or Modern Language (3), Mathematics (3), Science 
(4), Religion (2), English (3). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Latin (4), Greek or Modern Language (3), English Literature (3), 
Sociology (3), Logic (3), Speech (2), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Latin (4), Greek or Modern Language (3), English Literature (3), 
Sociology (3), Metaphysics (3), Art (2), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Psychology (3), History (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Elec- 
tives (9). 

Second semester: Theodicy (3), History (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Elec- 
tives (9). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Ethics (3), History of Philosophy (2), Religion (2), Major and Minor 
Electives (9). 

Second semester: Ethics (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Electives (9). 

Science Courses (B.S.) 

BIOLOGY 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Botany (4), Chemistry (4), French or German (3), English (3), 
Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Zoology (4), Chemistry (4), French or German (3), English (3), 
Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), English (3), Chemistry (4), French or German (3), 
Logic (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Biology (4), English (3), Chemistry (4), French or German (3), 
Metaphysics (3), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Psychology (3), History (3), Religion (2). 
Second semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Theodicy (3), History (3), Religion (2). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Biology (6), Chemistry (4), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (2). 

Second semester: Biology (4), History and Philosophy of Biology (2), Ethics (3), 
Religion (2), Electives (4). 

Bulletin of Information Page Thirty-one 



CHEMISTRY 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: General Inorganic Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), Mod- 
ern Language (3), Drawing (2) or Biology (4), Religion (2). 

Second semester: General Inorganic Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), 
Modern Language (3), Drawing (2) or Biology (4), Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Quantitative analysis (4), Physics (4), Modern Language (3), Logic 
(3), Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Quantitative analysis (4), Physics (4), Modern Language (3), Meta- 
physics (3), Religion (2), Mathematics (3). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Organic Chemistry (4), Psychology (3), English (3), Religion (2), 
History (3), Electricity and magnetism (4). 

Second semester: Organic Chemistry (4), Theodicy (3), English (3), Religion (2), 
History (3), Electricity and magnetism (4). 
SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Physical chemistry (5), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Major and minor 
electives (6). 

Second semester: Physical chemistry (5), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Major and minor 
electives (6). 

MATHEMATICS 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Mathematics (3), Chemistry (4), English (3), French or German (3), 
Religion (2). 

Second semester: Mathematics (3), Chemistry (4), English (3), French or German 
(3), Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Calculus I (3), General Physics (4), English (3), Logic (3), French 
or German (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Calculus II (3), General Physics (4), English (3), Metaphysics (3), 
French or German (3), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Mathematics (3), Psychology (3), Religion (2), History (3), Minor 
Electives (6). 

Second semester: Mathematics (3), Theodicy (3), Religion (2), History (3), Minor 
Electives (6). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Mathematics (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (9). 
Second semesters Mathematics (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (9). 

PHYSICS 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), French or German (3), 
Religion (2). 

Second semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), French or German (3), 
Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: General Physics (4), English (3), Calculus I (3), Logic, (3), Religion 
(2) French or German (3). 

Second semester: General Physics (4), English (3), Calculus II (3), General Meta- 
physics (3), Religion (2), French or German (3). 

Page Thirty-two Spring Hill College 






JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Physics (6), Differential Equations (3), Psychology (3), History (3), 
Religion (2). 

Second semester: Physics (6), Theodicy (3), History (3), Religion (2), Elective 
(Mathematics suggested) (3). 

First semester: Physics (4), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (8). 

Second semester: Physics (4), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (8). 

Social Science Course (B.S.) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Modern Language (3), Science or Mathematics (3-4), English (3), 
History (3), Sociology or Political Science (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Modern Language (3), Science or Mathematics (3-4), English (3), 
History (3), Sociology or Political Science (3), Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Modern Language (3), English (3), Logic (3), Economics (3), Soci- 
ology or Political Science (3), Public Speaking (2), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Modern Language (3), English (3), Metaphysics (3), Economics (3), 
Sociology or Political Science (3), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Philosophy (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Electives (12). 
Second semester: Philosophy (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Electives (12). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Ethics (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Electives (9). 
Second semester: Ethics (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Electives (9). 

PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Commerce Courses (B.S.C.) 

Under a program of expansion, Spring Hill College has increased its 
course offerings in various fields of commerce. This program embraces an 
intensive training in Accounting, Banking and Finance, General Business, 
Industrial Management, and Merchandising as well as a complete training in 
Economics for students preparing for graduate work in that field. Pre-law 
students are offered a strong business program designed to meet law school 
requirements. 

The need of a broad foundation in liberal education, as well as general 
survey of the entire business field, is not overlooked in the planned specialized 
courses. All commerce students take a prescribed program of work in the 
freshman year; specialization begins later. 

As a complement to the campus instruction, the department, with the co- 
operation of Mobile business firms, conducts studies of on-the-ground business 
practices. These field trips are designed to bridge the gap between the class- 
room and the plant. 

The professional accounting program is planned to prepare the student 
for work in the executive and public accounting fields. It has been carefully 
organized to fit the requirements for practical professional work and ultimate 
public certification. It also meets maximum requirements in those states 
which require that aspirants to public certification graduate from college 
with specific preparation in accounting, law, finance, economics and the like. 

Bulletin of Information Page Thirty-three 



The Department of Commerce maintains an active employment service 
for its student personnel. Organized confidential records are prepared for 
students desiring aid and are available for examination by prospective em- 
ployers. 

In the choice of electives the student should consult his special adviser 
before registration in any semester. 

GENERAL PROGRAM FOR FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Algebra (3), English (3), History (3), Economics (3), Elementary 
Accounting (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Trigonometry (3), English (3), History (3), Economics (3), Ele- 
mentary Accounting (3), Religion (2). 

ACCOUNTING 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: English (3), Economic Analysis (3), Business Law (3), Intermediate 
Accounting (3), Logic (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: English (3), Economic Analysis (3), Business Law (3), Intermediate 
Accounting (3), Metaphysics (3), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Advanced Accounting (3), Cost Accounting (3), Corporation Finance 
(3), *Money and Banking (3), Psychology (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Advanced Accounting (3), Advanced Cost Accounting (3), Intro- 
duction to Industrial Maangement (3), *Marketing (3), Theodicy (3), Religion (3). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Income Tax Procedure (3), Elementary Auditing (3), *Business Ad- 
ministration Elective (3), Labor Problems (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Income Tax Procedure (3), Advanced Auditing (3), *Business Ad- 
ministration Electives (3), Speech (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: English (3), Economic Analysis (3), Business Law (3), Financial 
Statement Analysis (3), Logic (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: English (3), Economic Analysis (3), Business Law (3), Statistics 
(3), Metaphysics (3), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Corporation Finance (3), Labor Problems (3), Money and Banking 
(3), Elective (3), Psychology (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Introduction to Industrial Management (3), Marketing (3), Speech 
(3), Elective (3), Theodicy (3), Religion (3). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Electives in Major Field (6), Electives (5), Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Business Problems (3), Elective in Major Field (3), Elective (3), 
Religion (3). 

MAJOR FIELD ELECTIVES 

Banking and Finance: (choose 3) Investments, Credit Management, Advertising, Sales- 
manship, Bank Administration, Insurance, Real Estate, Transportation, Monetary Theory, 
Business Cycles. 

Industrial Management: (choose 3) Purchasing, Sales Management, Insurance, Time 
and Motion Study, Manufacturing Industries, Advanced Industrial Management Problems, 
Personnel Problems, Labor Law, Industrial Relations, Transportation. 

*Advanced ROTC may be substituted here. 

Page Thirty-four Spring Hill College 



Merchandising: (choose 3) Retailing Problems, Purchasing, Credit Management, Adver- 
tising, Salesmanship, Sales Management, Insurance, Personnel Problems, International Trade, 
Business Cycles. 

General Business: Three courses chosen from the above fields with the advice and con- 
sent of the student's major adviser. 

ECONOMICS 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Economic Analysis (3), English (3), Business Law (3), Modern Lan- 
guage (3), Logic (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Economic Analysis (3), English (3), Business Law (3), Modern 
Language (3), Metaphysics (3), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Money and Banking (3), Financial Statement Analysis (3), Sociology 
(3), Minor Elective (3), Psychology (3), Religion (2). 

Selond semester: Speech (3), Statistics (3), Sociology (3), Minor Elective (3), Theo- 
dicy (3), Religion (2). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Major Elective (3), Minor Elective (3), Cultural Elective (4), General 
Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Major Elective (3), Minor Elective (3), Cultural Elective (4), Special 
Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

COMPOSITE DEPARTMENTAL MAJOR FOR PRE-LEGAL TRAINING 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Same as listed under Business Administration. 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Speech (3), Corporation Finance (3), Elective (3), Sociology (3), Psy- 
chology (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Speech (3), Public Finance (3), Elective (3), Sociology (3), Theo- 
dicy (3), Religion (2). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Labor Problems (3), Income Tax Procedure (3), Political Science (3), 
Advanced Speech (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Labor Law (3), Income Tax Procedure (3), Political Science (3), Ad- 
vanced Speech (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

COMPOSITE DEPARTMENTAL MAJOR FOR COMMERCIAL TEACHING 

This curriculum prepares the student for the Alabama Class B Secondary Professional 
Certificate. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Algebra (3), English (3), History (3), Science (3-4), Economics (3), 
Religion (2). 

Second semester: Trigonometry (3), English (3), History (3), Science (3-4), Eco- 
nomics (3), Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: English (3), Sociology (3), Business Law (3), Introduction to Edu- 
cation (3), Logic (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: English (3), Sociology (3), Business Law (3), Education Elective 
(3), Metaphysics (3), Religion (2). 

TUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Elementary accounting (3), Typing (2), Shorthand (2), Political Sci- 
ence (3), Education Elective (3), Psychology (3), Religion (2). 

Bulletin of Information Page Thirty-five 



Second semester: Elementary Accounting (3), Typing (2), Shorthand (2), Political 
Science (3), Speech (3), Theodicy (3), Religion (2). 
SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Typing (2), Shorthand (2), Financial Statement Analysis (3), Money 
and Banking (3), Education Electives (6), Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Typing (2), Shorthand (2), Statistics (3), Business Administration 
Elective (3), Education Electives (6), Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

Engineering Course 

While Spring Hill College does not have the facilities for a complete 
engineering course in any of its various branches, yet it can and does give 
some of the basic, fundamental instruction common to all branches of en- 
gineering. Attention is called particularly to the necessity of thorough prepa- 
ration in English and Mathematics. It is presupposed that a candidate's train- 
ing in English will enable him to express his ideas clearly either orally or in 
writing. In Mathematics, emphasis should be on a thorough mastery of funda- 
mental principles, operations and definitions rather than on covering a wide 
range of subjects. The student whose high school training is deficient in 
these subjects should consider seriously the possibility that his vocational 
choice of engineering is ill-advised; such procedure can forestall future dis- 
appointments. The first two years of engineering training in all branches is 
nearly uniform and can be partially secured by the following program. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), Engineering Drawing 
(2), Religion (2), General Geology (2). 

Second semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), Engineering Drawing 
(2), Religion (2), Engineering Problems (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Calculus I (3), English (3), General Physics (4), Mechanics (2), De- 
scriptive Geometry (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Calculus II (3), English (3), General Physics (4), Mechanics (2), 
Religion (2), Surveying (3). 

Pre-Legal Course 

Most law schools admit all applicants who have successfully completed 
three years of a regular college course for a minimum of 90 credit hours. A 
few with higher standards require an A.B. degree. The usual curriculum to 
be followed is that of the B.S. in Social Sciences. 

For the student who looks forward to a possible law career in Industrial 
relations, Labor law, Tax law, Corporation law and the like, the special com- 
merce department program for pre-legal training, which leads to a B.S. de- 
gree in commerce as a preliminary to entrance into law school, should be of 
definite interest. It is listed earlier in this bulletin. 

Pre-Dental Course 

Although the minimum requirement for admission to recognized dental 
schools is two years of college work with an emphasis on science courses, in 
practice a student must have completed three of four years of college work 
before he can reasonably expect admission. The following program will assist 
the student in attaining his professional objective. 

Page Thirty-six Spring Hill College 



FIRST YEAR 

First semester: General Zoology (4), General Chemistry (4), French or German (3), 
English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (2). , 

Second semester: General Zoology (4), General Chemistry (4), French or German (3), 
English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

SECOND YEAR 

First semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), French or German (3), Logic (3), Re- 
ligion (2), Physics (4). 

Second semester: Biology (4), English (3), French or German (3), Philosophy (3), 
Religion (2), Physics (4). 

THIRD YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Psychology (3), History (3), Religion (2). 
Second semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Theodicy (3), History (3), Religion (2). 

Pre-Medical Course 

The minimum requirement for admission to recognized medical schools, 
in addition to the high school requirement, is ninety semester hours of col- 
legiate work extending through three years of at least thirty-two weeks each, 
in a college approved by the Council of Medical Education of the American 
Medical Association. 

The subjects prescribed for the minimum of three years of college work 
are as follows: 

Chemistry (12), Physics (8), Biology (8), English composition and literature (6), 
Other non-science subjects (12) French or German (8-12). 

Subjects strongly urged: 

Advanced botany or comparative anatomy (3-6), Psychology (3-6), Algebra and trigo- 
nometry (3-6), Additional courses in chemistry (3-6). 

Other suggested electives: 

English (additional), economics, history, sociology, political science, logic, Latin, Greek, 
drawing. 

The above represents the minimum requirements. It is to serve these that 
the Spring Hill pre-medical program, as outlined below, is designed. The 
ideal preparation for the future doctor and now required by some medical 
schools is the four-year course leading to a B.S., or preferably, an A.B. degree. 
The student in this case, however, should make sure to include in his elective 
studies the courses listed above. 

FIRST YEAR 

First semester: General Zoology (4), General Chemistry (4), French or German (3), 
English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: General Zoology (4), General Chemistry (4), French or German (3), 
English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

SECOND YEAR 

First semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), French or German (3), Logic (3), Re- 
ligion (2), Physics (4). 

Second semester: Biology (4), English (3), French or German (3), Philosophy (3), 
Religion (2), Physics (4). 

THIRD YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Psychology (3), History (3), Religion (2). 
Second semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Theodicy (3), History (3), Religion (2). 

Bulletin of Information Page Thirty-seven 



i 



Teacher Training 

Students who wish to prepare for teaching careers in high school may 
fulfill all requirements for necessary teaching certificates while working on 
their degree programs. The requirements for such certification in the State 
of Alabama are outlined below. 

CLASS B SECONDARY TEMPORARY PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE 

A Class B Secondary Temporary Professional Certificate may be issued 
to a person who presents credentials showing: 

1. That he has graduated with a bachelor's or master's degree from a standard in- 
stitution and has met requirements as prescribed by the State Board of Education for the 
training of selondary teachers (Spring Hill is such an institution); 

2. That he has earned prescribed semester hours credits as follows: Education (18) 
including Psychology (4-8), Principles and Philosophy (2-6), Electives in the fields 
Secondary Education (4-12), English (12), Social Studies (12), including courses, each 
of which has a credit value from 2 to 4 hours in 2 of the following fields: History, Eco- 
nomics, Political Science, Sociology, or Geography; Science (6). 

3. That he has to his credit an academic Major of (18) hours in an approved subject; 

4. That he has to his credit an academic minor of (12) hours in an approved subject. 

A Class B Secondary Temporary Professional Certificate is valid for a 
period of three years and is the authority of the holder to teach the subjects 
named in its face and other high school subjects as conditions may require. 
This certificate cannot be continued or reinstated. 

If the holder of this certificate expects to continue to teach after it expires, 
he must meet requirements for a Class B Secondary Professional Certificate 
or a Class A Secondary Professional Certificate. 

CLASS B SECONDARY PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE 

To the requirements for the Class B Secondary Temporary Professional 
Certificate the following must be added to obtain a Class B Secondary Pro- 
fessional Certificate: 

1. Education (6), including Psychology (3), Principles and Philosophy (2), Materials 
and Methods of Teaching Major or Minor Subject in High School (2-6), Directed Teach- 
ing of Major or Minor Subject in High School (2-8), Electives in the field of Secondary 
Education (0-10); 

2. The academic major in approved subject must be 24 semester hours; 

3. The academic minor in approved subject must be 18 semester hours. 

A Class B Secondary Professional Certificate is a conditional permanent 
certificate which is valid in periods of eight years and is the authority of the 
holder to teach the subjects named in its face and other high school subjects 
as conditions may require. 

NATIONAL TEACHER EXAMINATION 

Students enrolled in the Department of Education must take the National 
Teacher Examination sometime during their course, and make the results of 
these examinations a part of their permanent record. The National Teacher 
Examinations are administered annually at Spring Hill College. The special 
student rate given by the National Office will be charged to the student. 
This rate for the Common and Optional Examination is $4.50. 

observation and practice teaching 

In order to supplement its instruction in educational principles, aims, 
methods, curricula and procedure, and to cultivate professional skill in teach- 

Page Thirty-eight Spring Hill College > 



ing, Spring Hill College has secured the cooperation of the Jesuit High 
School of New Orleans. Through the courtesy of its administrators and 
teachers, this school thus becomes the proving ground for the professional 
students of the Department of Education, who have free access to its class- 
rooms for observation of the methods practiced therein and for supervised 
practice teaching. Co-operating with the State Department of Education, 
Spring Hill College requires that its candidates for degrees with a major 
in education present a minimum of 4 semester hours in observation and prac- 
tice teaching with a minimum of 40 full periods of class teaching and 15 
hours of observation. 

Reserve Officers Training Corps 

Spring Hill College has a Transportation Unit of the U. S. Army Re- 
serve Officers Training Corps to provide instruction in Military Science and 
Tactics. The general object of the ROTC is to qualify students for positions 
of leadership in time of national emergency. 

The immediate objective of the four-year course of instruction in military 
science and tactics is to produce junior officers with required qualities of 
leadership. Upon successful completion of this course and having also ful- 
filled requirements for an academic degree the student is commissioned a 
Second Lieutenant, Officers Reserve Corps, United States Army. All regu- 
larly enrolled undergraduate students, who are physically qualified and citi- 
zens of the United States between the ages of 14 and 23 are eligible for en- 
rollment. The course is optional and is divided into a two-year basic course 
and a two-year advanced course. Further details of the program will be fur- 
nished upon inquiry. 

Evening Division 

For the benefit of students who are unable to attend classes during the 
day, the evening division offers a variety of courses in downtown Mobile. 
These courses are for the most part from the Department of Commerce. 
However, to satisfy the needs of those who wish to qualify for the bachelor's 
degree, other required courses are given regularly. 

General admission regulations in the evening division are the same as 
those listed earlier in this Bulletin (see admission requirements and educa- 
tional objectives). In addition to the usual college admissions, persons de- 
siring secretarial training through intensive work of this type may enroll 
either as special students or, by including other regular academic courses 
in their program, as candidates for the B.S.C. degree. 

The maximum load for a student in the evening division is twelve hours 
credit per semester. It is possible for a student to satisfy the requirements 
for the bachelor's degree in approximately five and one-half years; this time 
can be shortened considerably by attendance at summer sessions. 

Details of curricula available, dates of registration, fees and other pertinent 
information are available in a separate bulletin. 



Bulletin of Information Page Thirty-nine 



FEES AND EXPENSES 



BASIC FEES: 

For all students: 

TUITION 

ACTIVITY 



FEE- 



For boarding students only: 

BOARD ._ 

ROOM 

LAUNDRY 

MEDICAL FEE 



REGULAR SESSION 
PER SEMESTER 



$150.00 
25.00 



180.00 

65.00 

25.00 

5.00 






*Per 



y 



SUMMER 
SESSION 

$10.00* 
5.00 

Credit Hour 

75.00 

30.00 

10.00 

5.00 



FEES FOR NEW STUDENTS ONLY: 

Matriculation fee 

Room Deposit (Boarders only) 



SPECIAL FEES: (payable each semester where required) 

Science Laboratory (for each course) 

Laboratory Breakage Deposit (refundable) 

Accounting Laboratory 

Surveying — 

C. P. A. Review Course 

ROTC Deposit (refundable) 

MISCELLANEOUS FEES: 

Conditional Examination (day assigned) 

Conditional Examination (special day) 

Special Tutoring (per hour) 

Make-up Laboratory Period (each) 

Duplicate Transcript of Credit 

Fee for Late Registration 

Fee for Change of Registration 

Golf Membership Fee (per semester) 

Graduation Fee (payable final year only) 

National Teacher Examination 



10.00 
10.00 



7.50 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
40.00 
20.00 



2.00 
5.00 
3.00 
2.00 
1.00 
5.00 
2.00 
12.00 
15.00 
4.50 



MUSIC FEES: (per semester) 

Lessons one hour weekly 45.00 

Use of piano one hour daily 5.00 

Use of organ one hour daily 25.00 



Page Forty 



Spring Hill College 



Activities Fee includes use of the library, entertainments and lectures pro- 
vided by the College authorities, student publications, athletic contests, both 
intercollegiate and intra-mural and courses in physical education. 

Rooms are shared by two occupants. They are equipped with lavatory 
and toilet and are supplied with hot and cold water and all necessary heavy 
furnishings. Students supply their own towels, rugs and whatever decorations 
are appropriate. 

Medical Fee takes care of medical attention by the Staff Physician and 
ordinary nursing in the College Infirmary not in excess of ten days. 

Matriculation Fee, as indicated above, is payable on first entrance only. 

Room Deposit, which must accompany each application for entrance is 
not applied to room rent but is retained to cover any damage beyond reason- 
able wear which may be done to the room or its furnishings while occupied 
by the students. The balance is returned to the parents when the student 
withdraws from the College. In case a students fails to occupy a room after 
reservation, the deposit will not be returned, unless notice of withdrawal is 
received one month before scheduled occupancy of room. 

REGULATIONS OF THE TREASURER 

All checks should be made payable to Spring Hill College and addressed 
directly to the Treasurer's Office. Because of Mobile bank regulations, it is 
requested that Cashier's Checks or Exchange Checks be sent, rather than 
personal checks. A charge of ten cents per fifty dollars will be added to 
personal checks. Those desiring to send Postal Money Orders should have 
them drawn on the Mobile Post Office. Payments made from countries out- 
side continental United States should be made payable in New York or New 
Orleans exchange. 

All minor expenses, for books, stationery, etc., are on a strictly cash basis. 
Money for the personal accounts should be sent directly to the student, who 
alone will be responsible to the parents or guardians for an itemized state- 
ment of expenditures. This money may be deposited for safe keeping with 
the Treasurer, but in this case parents must state in writing a definite amount 
for weekly withdrawals by the student. No advance of money will ever be 
made at any time for any purpose whatever. In case of emergency, students 
should have money wired to them. 

If a student is withdrawn before the end of the semester, no deductions 
will be made. Should, however, a student leave on account of prolonged ill- 
ness, or be dismissed honorably, a deduction for board and room rental, but 
not for tuition and fees, will be made for the remainder of the semester, be- 
ginning with the first of the following month. The date on which notice is 
received by the Treasurer from the Registrar s Office is considered the date 
of withdrawal. 

No student may have an honorable dismissal nor will he be given credit 
for his studies or be admitted to the examination in January or May until 
all indebtedness to the College has been setded. 

Bulletin of Information Page Forty-one 



The College will not be responsible for books, clothing, jewelry or any 
other articles possessed by the student while in school or left by him at his 
departure. 

Refunds, when due, are made only to parents or guardians of the stu- 
dent, unless the College be instructed in writing by parent or guardian to 
make the refund to the student. 

PLAN OF PAYMENTS 

Although the general regulation calls for payment in two installments, 
the College offers the following alternative: Payment may be made in monthly 
installments in advance. An extra charge of $5.00 will be added, should par- 
ents or guardian elect to pay on the monthly plan. This charge will be made 
and is payable with the first monthly installment. 

Special arrangements for any other alternative plan of payments or pos- 
sible reduction in the case of brothers, must be made before the opening 
classes with the Treasurer. 



Page Forty-two Spring Hill College 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT AID 



Scholarships 

Realizing the importance of substantial aid in the encourage- 
ment of deserving students, far-seeing friends of the College have 
from time to time set aside funds for the establishment of scholar- 
ships. A perpetual scholarship is established by the gift of funds 
whose interest will yield a sum sufficient to pay tuition at least in 
part. To cover the entire yearly cost of tuition an endowment of 
$5,000 is required. An annual scholarship is provided by the yearly 
donation of $250. 

The Little Flower Scholarship. This scholarship is worth $200 annually. 

The Saint Ignatius Scholarship. 

The Charles P. Miller Gold Star Scholarship, founded by his mother 
in memory of this member of the class of 1938, who gave his life for his 
country in World War II. J>, /,///« fre/d 

The Bishop Toolen Scholarships, donated by the Most Reverend T. J. 
Toolen, D.D., Bishop of Mobile, carry remittance of tuition fees. One was 
awarded for the period beginning with the fall semester 1949 and another 
was awarded for the fall of 1950. & Y* *jtl<^-*^_ /? M^^^^ ^ ^ c_ 

The American Legion-Veterans of Foreign Wars Memorial Scholar- 
ship. This scholarship is awarded by the Robert L. Bullard Post No. 49 of 
the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the Lamar Y. McLeod Post No. 3 of the 
American Legion to a graduate of the schools of Mobile County. This scholar- 
ship is a memorial to those Americans who made the supreme sacrifice in 
the defense of their country. Cr\S*~htr4s * 

The McGill Scholarship (formerly the Spring Hill High School Scholar- 
ship) is awarded annually to the graduate of McGill Institute, Mobile, who 
wins the highest honors of his class. It carries remittance of tuition fees for 
the student's course. /*W<v/*- <£"/**-** - W**dr . 

The Christian Brothers Scholarship is awarded under the same condi- 
tions as the preceding one to the honor graduate of Christian Brothers' Col- 
lege, Memphis, Tennessee. Dtent* . 

The Jesuit High School Scholarships are granted to the honor graduate 
of each of the High Schools of the New Orleans Province of the Society of 
Jesus, namely, Jesuit High School of New Orleans, Jesuit High School of 
Dallas, Jesuit High School of Tampa, St. John's High School of Shreveport. 

Bulletin of Information J Page Porty-thret 

frt (km Sl • 



Finally, a restricted number of Spring Hill College Scholarships will 
he granted by the college annually. Applications for these scholarships must 
be made to the Dean before August 1st. These scholarships are awarded on 
the basis of proven need and high academic standing. 

Self Aid 

A certain number of student assistantships and clerical positions 
are open annually to deserving students. Students wishing to profit 
by such financial aid should apply to the Dean before May 15th. 

Conditions of Tenure 

A student receiving assistance through scholarship or college 
employment is expected to maintain a scholastic standing which in 
the judgment of the college authorities gives evidence that he is 
making the most of his abilities and opportunities. A mediocre, 
though passing, record in any semester raises for consideration the 
question of continuance of financial assistance. It is clear that the 
student receiving aid must be regular in attendance at his college 
exercises and also must maintain a record of good conduct. 

Gifts and Bequests 

As a private institution of higher learning, Spring Hill College 
must look to its friends and benefactors and to all whose bounty 
is on occasion devoted to the cause of education for the generous 
contributions which will enable the College to carry on its work 
of education, to provide an increase in the aid to deserving students, 
and to extend its contribution to the spread of knowledge and truth. 
Gifts to the College may take the form of funds for the establish- 
ment of scholarships or professorships, of additions to the material 
equipment or library collections, of contributions to the general en- 
dowment fund, or may be undesignated. Those desiring to make 
a bequest to Spring Hill in their wills may be helped by the fol- 
lowing suggested form: 

LEGAL FORM FOR BEQUEST 

/ give (devise) and bequeath to Spring Hill College, an institution incor- 
porated under the laws of the State of Alabama, and located at Spring Hill, 

Mobile County, Alabama, its successors forever, the sum of 

Dollars (or otherwise describe the gift) for its general corporate purpose (or 
name a particular corporate purpose). 



Page Forty-four Spring Hill College 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

The conditions to be satisfied in order that a baccalaureate de- 
gree be earned may be classified under the following headings. 

1. COURSE REQUIREMENT 

The required subjects for various degrees are as follows: 

Prescribed for the A.B. Degree 

Latin (16), Greek or Modern Language (6-12), English (12), Science (8), Mathe- 
matics (6), History (6), Religion (16), Logic (3), Metaphysics (6), Psychology (3), Ethics 
(6), History of Philosophy (2), Sociology (6), Public Speaking (2). 

Prescribed for the B.S. Degree (Natural Sciences) 

Biology (8) and Chemistry (8), or Chemistry (8) and Physics (8), Mathematics (6), 
English (12), Modern Language (6-12), History (6), Logic (3), Metaphysics (6), Ethics 
(6), Psychology (3), Religion (16). 

Prescribed for the B.S. Degree (Social Sciences) 

Modern Language (6-12), English (12), Science of Mathematics (6), History (6), 
Political Science (6), Economics (6), Religion (16), Logic (3), Metaphysics (6), Ethics 
(6), Sociology (6), Public Speaking (2), Psychology (3). 

^Prescribed for the B.S.C. Degree (Commerce) 

Mathematics (6), Business Law (6), English (12), History (6), Public Speaking (2), 
Religion (16), Logic (3), Metaphysics (6), Psychology (3), Ethics (6). 

2. QUANTITATIVE REQUIREMENT 

In order to qualify for a baccalaureate degree the student must present a 
program of studies consisting of not less than 132 semester hours of work, 
including the courses listed in the preceding section appropriate to the de- 
gree he seeks. 

3. QUALITATIVE REQUIREMENT 

A candidate for a degree must obtain not only the number of credits re- 
quired, but his work must reach a certain standard of excellence. In addition 
to the 132 hours credit necessary for graduation, each student must earn at 
least 132 quality points, or an average mark in all subjects of C or better. 
No student will be advanced to candidacy for any collegiate degree whose 
credit points do not equal his semester hours at the beginning of his last 
semester. 

4. LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT 

All candidates for academic degrees must pass satisfactorily a reading test 
in French, German or Spanish to be administered after they have completed 
the intermediate course. Furthermore, a test in proficiency in English is given 

Bulletin of Information Page Forty-five 



to all Sophomores; successful completion of this test by the beginning of the 
semester in which the student plans to graduate is a prerequisite to graduation 
for all candidates. 

5. CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENT 

There must be completed a major sequence in some subject (or at the 
discretion of the department concerned and with the approval of the Dean, 
in some closely related group of subjects) and a minor sequence in another 
subject. The uniform requirement for a major sequence in any department 
is a program of eighteen hours of upper division courses; for a minor se- 
quence, a program of twelve hours of upper division courses. A major may be 
changed only by the consent of the Dean and the heads of the departments 
concerned, and such changes will be permitted only upon the distinct under- 
standing that all the courses prescribed in the major finally chosen shall be 
completed before graduation. 

6. COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

At the end of his senior year the candidate for a degree must pass a com- 
prehensive examination on the various courses offered as a major. Candi- 
dates for honors at graduation (see below) must also present an acceptable 
thesis for the approval of the Dean. 

7. RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT 

The senior year (or 24 of the last 30 semester hours of work) must be 
made at Spring Hill College. 

8. GRADUATION FEE 

A graduation fee of fifteen dollars is payable in advance and a setdement 
of all indebtedness to the College must be made. 

All applicants for a degree must file their applications and present their 
credits and the evidence of having met all requirements listed above on or be- | 
fore the first of April preceding commencement. 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

GRADUATION HONORS 

The honors at graduation to be inscribed on the diplomas, read at com- 
mencement and published in the lists of graduates are granted on the basis of 
quality points in their ratio to the total number of credit hours carried and j 
are awarded according to the following scale: maxima cum laude for a quality 
quotient of 2.9; magna cum laude for a quality quotient of 2.7; cum laude I 
for a quality quotient of 2.5. 



Page Forty-six Spring Hill College 



PRIZES AND TROPHIES 



To encourage the students of Spring Hill College in the de- 
velopment of initiative, self-reliance and leadership in various phases 
of college life the following prizes and trophies are awarded in 
recognition of outstanding achievement. In most instances the 
awards are made annually. 

The Joseph Block Memorial Medal for Music has been founded by the 
children of a former Professor of Music at the college; viz., Edward Block 
of New York; Alexander Block, Mrs. Bettie Haas, Mrs. Emma Eichold and 
Mrs. Francis B. Simon of Mobile. 

This medal was won by Thomas Culhy. Oj^W^ 9fa*-~*<<^<>£L*^ 

The Bishop O'Sullivan Memorial Medal is awarded for excellence in Chris- 
tian Doctrine and Ecclesiastical* History. * j y 
This medal was n<X-auw4at. w> » n. !> \ W~ **J*^ 

The Hutchison Medal, founded by Miller Reese Hutchison is awarded to 
the writer of the best thesis in Philosophy. ^ 

This medal was won by Felix F. Darby. JoSef** v 



The Merilh Medal for the best English essay was founded by Edmund H. 
Merilh, B.S., 1917. 

This medal was won by^ Joscpf r'BuchahlTrr. 



Afi C(u>*-y d^Kf 



The Walsh Memorial Medal was founded in memory of William A. Walsh, 
A.B., 1908, for excellence in Oratory. . o . 

This medal was won by G e orge Barrett. - Aft ' ^ 1 /J**n* »*? * 

The O'Callaghan Medal, donated by Rev. J. McDermott, in memory of 
Rev. C. T. O'Callaghan, D.D., for the best paper in Latin. s 

This medal was won by Thomas Culhy . '3ffr£t*% e Aiaht?n4-. \S 

The Mastin Medal, founded by the former physician of the college, Dr. 
William Mastin, is awarded for the best paper in General Chemistry. s 

This medal was won by Paul D. Lrahn. Ch/Lrtji \f Q(Hti 4 t /ff * 
The Stewart Medal is donated annually by Dr. Dudley M. Stewart, B.S., ^ a 

1923, for the best paper in Biology. A m i t * v It ]f(fy*~J&* 

This medal was won by Ja mes Brownin g. /f*^**~ ** &**&&*+ tit- — V /A^LJa- 

The Houssiere Medal, founded by Charles, Ernest and Jules Houssiere for 
excellence in mathematics. * i^>- 

This medal was won by W - illiam OllingcT . '*** tt^$^^*r- 

Bulletin of Information Page Forty-seven 



The Faulk Medal, donated by Ward C. Faulk for the highest honors of the 
Bachelor of Science in Commerce degree. 

This medal was won by JlZJUi t ttu Lvn'Z .Lcj^r*-* c e Ca hrt? // /(/* fy,^' 

The\Lange Medal, founded by Mrs. Louis\A. La**ge of, 
awarkeoV^QOyd^ll^ 

The Allen Medal, founded by the Most Reverend Edward P. Allen, former 
Bishop of Mobile, is awarded by the votes of the students to the one excelling 
in deportment. 

This medal was won by jumis P. Muiim r Z-fctcM-^ C^f-r*// Am 

The Toolen Medal, founded by the Most Reverend Thomas J. Toolen, D.D., 
Bishop of Mobile, to be awarded to the graduate with the highest scholastic 
average for his four years of work. 

This medal was won by Gbmd&s, Ji ffrrnfr £rn**<?^ fl*trip& t- — ' 

The Matt Rice Service Cup, founded by the Omicron Sigma Fraternity in 
memory of Matthew P. Rice, A.B., 1919, a founder of the fraternity, is 
awarded annually to the student, who during the year has rendered the 
greatest service to the college. ajT 

This cup was awarded to Jitwpc P, Mmtm* /a^^« C M <- 0-tfr>- 

The Freshman Cup, founded in 1938 at the silver jubilee reunion of the class 
of 1913 by the following members of the class: Father John J. Druhan, S.J., 
President of the College, Dr. William Barker, Lee A. Plauche, Frank Pro- 
haska, and William B. Slattery, is awarded annually to the Freshman show- 
ing greatest promise of future leadership. 

This cup was awarded to Clwrhr C, Ceyfa, Jr. /WV* * >V+tf X 

Prize of $25 Security Bond, donated by Mobile Academy of Science to out- 
standing Science Student at Spring Hill College. 

This bond was awarded to S awk'^Na bm. W^aIi-*^ JL ^r^^] 'ffl 

The Economics Medal is donated annually by Mrs. Ellen M. Betty for the 
best paper in Economics. 

This medal was won by Joseph ±4i Caahjey u n o^ <u~i^>L>~~* ■ 

The Distinguished Student in Accountancy Award of the Alabama Society 

of Certified Public Accountants. f\ J *C "7 — * rf~ 

This award was won by FmfilMfl T, McFv^y , i^C* — - k. / A^L - 



€ aU^- J~~— /(L^ t^o^rU^^ 

/^lj^ a^^u^ -£r~£^e 4 s/*^£ 



Page Forty -eight Spring Hill College 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

AND 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS 




DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



INTRODUCTORY NOTES 

The courses of instruction listed below are numbered according to a uni- 
fied plan. Lower division courses (usually taken by freshmen and sopho- 
mores) are numbered 1 to 99. Within the lower division numbers, the num- 
bers 30 to 99 frequendy indicate that the course is reserved for sophomores. 
Upper division courses (usually taken by juniors and seniors and supposing 
previous preparation) are numbered from 100 to 199. Courses given in the 
first semester are usually designated by an odd number and those given in 
the second semester by an even number. Double numbers (e.g. 141-142) fre- 
quently indicate that the first semester course is prerequisite for the second 
semester course and that both must be satisfactorily completed to obtain credit 
for either course. In most departments the courses are grouped into decades 
according to sequence, content, or some other plan of subdivision. 



KEY SYMBOL 

The following is a list of the key letters used to indicate the different 
departments of instruction: 



Accounting Ac German 



Biology Bl 

Business Administration Ac 

Chemistry Ch 

Econom ics Ec 

Education Ed 

Engineering Eg 

English En 

French Fr 



.....Gr Physical Education. 



Greek. - 
History 
Latin ... 



Gk 

Hs 

Lt 

Mathematics Mt 

Military Science and 

Tactics Ms 

Music Mu 

Philosophy _P/ 



_Pc 



Physics Ph 

Political Science Po 

Psychology Ps 

Religion Rl 

Sociology So 

Spanish Sp 

Speech Ex 



Of the courses listed below under the various department headings as 
many as may seem necessary will be given each term; the College, however, 
reserves the right to make such changes or variations as circumstances require, 
including restriction of the number of students to be admitted to any course. 



BIOLOGY (Bl) 

To major in biology a student must include in his program Bl 191 and at least fifteen 
additional upper division hours in biology, as approved by the chairman of the department. 
Students who plan to major in biology should confer with the department chairman as soon 
as possible after this decision has been reached. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. General Zoology 

An elementary course consisting of a study of protoplasm and the cell, the taxonomy of the 

animal kingdom, the morphology and physiology of animal types, and of the principal facts 

Bulletin of Information Page Fifty-one 



of heredity and evolution. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

3. Genetics 

A Survey course of the facts and theories of heredity and variation. Prerequisite: Bl 1 or 
equivalent. Lectures two hours per week. One semester. Two hours credit. 

4. Genetics Laboratory 

A practical course in methods of genetics investigation. Prerequisite: Accompanied by Bl 3. 
Two hours credit. 

5-6. Anatomy and Physiology 

A course intended primarily for nurses. It consists of lectures and demonstrations in gross 
human anatomy and physiology and of lectures and laboratory work in histology and em- 
bryology. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory two hours per week. Two semesters. 
Six hours credit. 

7. General Bacteriology 

This course is designed to make the student more familiar with the existence, char- 
acteristics and activities of micro-organisms, especially as they are related to nursing, with 
emphasis on cultural methods of studying bacteria; microscopic study of pathogenic bacteria 
and their relation to disease; history of microbiology; classification of bacteria; the mechan- 
ism of infection; immunity and immune substances. One semester. Three hours credit. 

8. Botany 

An elementary study of the plant kingdom. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four 
hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

9. Zoology 

An elementary study of the animal kingdom. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four 
hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

11. Introductory Biology 

A general introduction to the science of life designed especially for those who wish only a 
cultural background in biology. The course can not be substituted for Bl 8-9 by majors 
in biology or for Bl 1-2 by pre-medical and pre -dental students. Lectures and demonstra- 
tions three hours per week. Three hours credit. 

31. Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates 

A comparative study of type forms with special reference to analogy and homology. Pre- 
requisite: Bl 1-2. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. Given 
every year. One semester. Four hours credit. 

32. Mammalian Anatomy 

The anatomy of the cat. Prerequisite: Bl 31. Laboratory four hours per week. One semes- 
ter. Two hours credit. 

41. Field Botany 

Collection and classification of specimens of major plant groups; work divided between 

field and laboratory. Prerequisite: Bl 8. Two hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

121. Histology 

A study of cells, tissues and organ structure. Prerequisite: Bl 1-2 or 8-9. Lectures two 

hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

Page Fifty-two Spring Hill College 



722. Vertebrate Embryology 

A study of gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation and later development of 
typical vertebrate forms. Prerequisite: Bl 1-2 or 8-9. Lectures two hours per week; labora- 
tory four hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

125. Special Problems in Biology 

Presentation of problems in biology which have philosophical significance. May be substi- 
tuted for Bl 191. Three lectures per week. Three hours credit. 

150. Microscopic Technique 

A laboratory course in methods of preparing tissues for microscopic study. Prerequisite: Bl 

1-2 or 8-9. Time to be arranged. Two hours credit. 

161. Introduction to General Physiology 

A study of matter and energy in relation to living things; solution; diffusion and osmotic 
pressure; the physico-chemical structure of protoplasm. Prerequisites: Bl 112 or equivalent, 
and Ch 1-2, 31 and Ph 1-2. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
One semester. Four hours credit. 

762. General Physiology 

The fundamental life processes of organisms from a general and comparative viewpoint. 
Prerequisite: Bl 161. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. One 
semester. Four hours credit. 

191. History and Philosophy of Biology 

A discussion of the historical developments and philosophical implication of biology. Re- 
quired of all majors in biology; open to all seniors who have had a course in biology. 
Prerequisites: Bl 1-2 or equivalent and Pi 33-34 and 100. Two hours per week for one 
semester. Two hours credit. 

199. Introduction to Research 

Special work for advanced students and preparation of thesis. Admission only with the 

approval of head of the department. Credits to be arranged. 

CHEMISTRY (Ch) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

7-2. General Inorganic Chemistry 

A course dealing with the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry together with the 
systematic study of the elements. The laboratory experiments are designed to illustrate the 
matter of the course. Obligatory for all Freshmen B.S. Lectures two hours per week; 
laboratory four hours per week. Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

3. Hospital Chemistry 

An introductory survey for nurses, including principles of general chemistry, with special 

applications to nursing practice. Laboratory in blood and urine analysis. Three hours credit. 

11-12. Introductory Chemistry 

A general introduction to the science of chemistry designed to give the student a back- 
ground in this science. This course cannot be substituted for Ch 1-2 to qualify for advanced 
courses in chemistry. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory two hours per week. Two 
semesters. Six hours credit. 

31. Elementary Qualitative Analysis 

This course involves the theoretical and practical study of the principles underlying the 
isolation of the metallic and acid-forming elements. Obligatory for all Pre-Medical students 
and for all those majoring in chemistry. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four 
hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Fifty -three 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

131-132. Organic Chemistry 

The principles of organic chemistry and its relation to general chemistry are emphasized. 
Typical organic compounds are studied. General reactions and characteristics are discussed, 
and many applications to practical life are given. Obligatory for all Pre-Medical students and 
for those majoring in chemistry. Lectures three hours per week; laboratory four hours per 
week. Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

135. Special Problems in Chemistry 

Presentation of problems in chemistry which have philosophical significance. Three lectures 

per week. First semester. Three hours credit. 

140. Elementary Physical Chemistry 

This course is designed for biology and Pre-Medical majors and does not require calculus. 

Three hours credit. 

141-142. Physical Chemistry l-II 

This course is intended to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles of chemical 
theory; the states and properties of matter, thermodynamics, thermochemistry, solutions, 
equilibrium, conductance, electromotive force, phase equilibria, surface chemistry, kinetics 
and photochemistry are discussed. Obligatory for chemistry majors. Prerequisites: Mt 3-4, 
101-101; Quantitative analysis, Elementary organic chemistry, Electricity and magnetism. 
Six hours credit. 

143-144. Physical Chemistry Laboratory 

This course is designed to teach exact measurements, under carefully controlled conditions, 
on chemical substances and processes, a determination of sources and magnitude of error, 
and also to give familiarity with the classical and current literature of the field. Obligatory 
for all chemistry majors. Prerequisites: Mt 3-4, 101-102; Elementary physics and Electricity 
and magnetism. Ch 141-142 may be taken concurrendy. Four hours credit. 

145. Elementary Physical Chemistry Laboratory 

Experiments selected for the requirements of biology and Pre-Medical majors. Prerequisites: 
Quantitative analysis 153, Elementary organic chemistry, Physical chemistry. Ch 140 may 
be taken concurrently. One hour credit. 

153-154. Quantitative Analysis 

A more extended discussion of the theory and practice of volumetric and gravimetric 
methods, including an introduction to electroanalysis. Lecture two hours per week; labora- 
tory six hours per week. Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

161-162. Physiological Chemistry 

An elementary course dealing with the chemistry of the carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. 
The chemical basis underlying the phenomena of metabolism, enzymes, absorption and 
digestion are discussed. Lectures two hours per week. Two semesters. Four hours credit. 

163-164. Physiological Chemistry Laboratory 

A laboratory course to accompany 161-162. Four hours per week. Two semesters. Four 

hours credit. 

171. Qualitative Organic Analysis 

Purification and identification of organic compounds. Special emphasis is placed upon the 
practical analysis of compounds of organic origin. Lecture one hour per week; laboratory 
six hours. One semester. Three hours credit. 

172. Organic Preparations 

A one-semester course for seniors majoring in chemistry. Lecture one hour; laboratory six 
hours. Three hours credit. 

Page Fifty-jour Spring Hill College 



181-182. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

A course for seniors majoring in chemistry. Prerequisite: Ch 141 and 142. Three periods 

of lecture per week. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

183-184. Inorganic Preparations 

A course for seniors majoring in chemistry. Two periods of laboratory per week. Two 

semesters. Four hours credit. 

199. Advanced Seminar 

For seniors majoring in chemistry. Credits to be arranged. 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 

The Greek and Latin languages are so related as the media of a unified ancient culture 
that it seems desirable for the student who majors in classical languages to have courses 
in both. It is possible, however, for a student to major in either one separately. Arrange- 
ment of a joint concentration must be made with the Chairman. In both Greek and Latin, 
courses numbered lower than 10 are for students who fail to present at least two high 
school units in the language. Prerequisite for any upper division course are: three courses 
or their equivalent in high school units, and one year of lower division college work. In 
any degree program, eighteen semester hours must be upper division work. 

GREEK (Gk) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Elementary Gree\ 

Etymology and syntax with simple readings. Six hours credit. 

11-12. Intermediate Gree\ 

Review of grammar; readings from Xenophon. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101-102. Attic Orators 

Selections from Lysias, Isocrates, and Demosthenes. Six hours credit. 

131-132. Gree\ Drama 

A study of selected works of the masters of Greek tragedy. Six hours credit. 

141-142. Homer 

Selected passages from the Iliad or the Odyssey. Comparison with Virgil's Aenied. Six 

hours credit. 

181-182. A Study of the Gree\ Fathers 

Selected readings from Chrysostom and Basil and others. Six hours credit. 

LATIN (Lt) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Elementary Latin 

Etymology and synatax; simple readings. Eight hours credit. 

3-4. Intermediate Latin 

Review of grammar; reading from Caesar. Eight hours credit. 

11-12. Cicero 

Selected readings from Cicero's orations. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101-102. Roman Historians 

Selected readings from Sallust, Tacitus and Livy. Six hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Fifty-five 



103-104. Latin Lyric Poetry and Satire 
The Odes and Satires of Horace. Six hours credit. 

105-106. Roman Epic 

A study of Virgil's Aeneid. Six hours credit. 

131-132. Roman Philosophy 
Philosophical works of Cicero. Six hours credit. 

141-142. Patristic Latin 

Readings from Cyprian, Jerome, Ambrose, Augustine and other Latin Fathers. Six hours 

credit. 



COMMERCE 
ACCOUNTING (Ac) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

10. Introduction to Accounting 

A course in personal and professional accounting for non-commerce students; surveys the 
accounting field; includes some financial statement analysis. Not open to commerce students. 
Three hours credit. 

11-12. Elementary Principles of Accounting 

This is the basic course in accounting, stressing fundamentals, and providing practice in 

bookkeeping and accounting procedures. Required of commerce students. Six hours credit. 

21. Financial Statement Analysis 

The aim of this course is to train students to analyze and interpret financial statements for 

business control. Required of business administration and economics majors. Three hours 

credit. 

31-32. Intermediate Accounting 

A study of more advanced principles of accounting theory, including the study of the 
management viewpoint of accounting. Prerequisite: Ac 11-12. Required of accounting 
majors. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101-102. Advanced Accounting Problems 

Takes up advanced phases of accounting problems, including installment sales, partnership 
liquidations, consolidated statements, foreign exchange and fiduciary accounting. Prerequi- 
site: Ac 31-32. Required of all accounting majors. Six hours credit. 

131. Cost Accounting 

This is the first course in cost accounting. It includes a study of material, labor, and fac- 
tory burden accounting, process costs, etc. Prerequisite: Ac 31*32 and junior standing. 
Required of all accounting majors. Three hours credit. 

132. Advanced Cost Accounting 

Takes up more advanced topics of cost accounting and treats standard costs comprehensively. 
Prerequisites: Ac 31-32 and 131. Required of all accounting majors. Three hours credit. 

161-162. Income Tax Procedure 

Embraces a study of the Federal tax law. Emphasizes individual and partnership tax prob- 
lems during the first semester and corporation, gift, estate, reorganization and payroll tax 
problems during the second semester. Prerequisites: Ac 31-32 and junior standing. Re- 
quired of all accounting majors. Open to pre-law students as an elective. Six hours credit. 



Page Fifty-six Spring Hill College 






171-172. Elementary and Advanced Auditing 

This course covers theory and practice of auditing. Includes practice sets and supplemental 
readings. Prerequisites: Ac 101-102 and 131 (may be taken concurrently). Required of 
all accounting majors. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

181. Controllership 

The functions, duties, and responsibilities of the chief accounting officer in a public or 
private business enterprise are studied. Problems of office organization and management 
are treated as well as integration of staff activities. Takes up the work of the internal 
auditors and the study of internal accounting procedures and control. Prerequisite: Ac 101- 
102, 131, 132. Elective for accounting majors. Three hours credit. 

184. Governmental Accounting 

In this course the student studies the special features of accounting for municipalities and 
other governmental units as well as institutional accounting. Prerequisites: Ac 101-102. 
Elective for accounting majors. Three hours credit. 

191. C.P.A. Examination Review 

Preparation for actual practice and Theory and Practice section of C.P.A. examination. 
Topics include preparation of statements, accounting theory, funds and reserves, partner- 
ships, corporations, consolidated statements, fiduciary accounting, governmental accounting, 
cost problems, etc. Usually offered through Evening Division on the basis of four 2/4 
hour meetings per week for six weeks preceding semi-annual examination dates. Offered 
on demand. Prerequisites: Senior standing, Ac 101-102, 131-132, 171. For accounting 
majors only. Four hours credit. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (Ba) 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Typing for Beginners 

Student learns keyboard control, improvement of speed and accuracy, and business letter 

writing. Offered only in the Evening Division. Four hours credit. 

3-4. Advanced Typing 

Emphasis on speed building through improvement of basic technique, special letter writing 
problems, special typing problems. Prerequisite: Ba 1-2. Offered only in the Evening Divi- 
sion. Four hours credit. 

5-6. Elementary Shorthand 

A study of the theory of Gregg shorthand, development of skill in reading and writing from 
printed shorthand and beginning dictation. Offered only in the Evening Division. Four 
hours credit. 

7-8. Advanced Shorthand 

Rapid dictation and transcription training for secretarial positions in business and pro- 
fessional offices. Prerequisites: Ba 1-2, 5-6. Offered only in the Evening Division. Four 
hours credit. 

11-12. Office Training 

Fundamentals of indexing, filing, etc., business psychology, handling of mail, specialized 

secretarial duties, etc. Offered only in the Evening Division. Four hours credit. 

21. Introduction to Business 

This is a survey course offered primarily for non-commerce students to acquaint them 
with general business practices and the different fields of business activity. Not open to 
commerce students. Three hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Fifty-seven 



31-32. Business Law 

A general course covering contracts, agency, corporation, negotiable instruments, sales, bail- 
ments and carriers, unfair competition. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

115. Corporation Finance 

A study of the problems of financial management of a business. Some of the topics con- 
sidered are: promotion, stocks, bonds, notes, accounts, source of fixed capital, distribution 
of earnings, expansion, reorganization. "Three hours credit. 

117 . Introduction to Industrial Management 

A survey course in management principles and methods. The student is given a compre- 
hensive view of modern practices of planning, organizing, and controlling various functional 
activities in business. Three hours credit. 

124. Investments 

A study of the nature and principles of Investment with their application to the types of 

securities and an analysis of the channels of distribution. Three hours credit. 

132. Marketing 

A presentation of the fundamental principles and methods of marketing functions with an 
analysis of consumer buying habits and motives. Three hours credit. 

133. Retailing Problems 

A course including the intensive study of retail store management and operations. Buying 
operations, stock control and merchandise planning are also included. Open to merchan- 
dising seniors, others with permission of the instructor. Three hours credit. 

136. Purchasing 

The study of the principles of purchasing and types of actual problems confronting a pur- 
chasing agent in the performance of his duties. Three hours credit. 

138. Credit Management 

This course includes the study of the work of the credit manager in the various types of 
marketing agencies, and credit from the mercantile credit manager's viewpoint. Three 
hours credit. 

143. Advertising 

A study of the practices and policies of advertising in the main type of advertising media. 
Three hours credit. 

144. Salesmanship 

The underlying economic and psychological laws which govern selling. Three hours credit. 

145. Sales Management 

A study of the following problems: product, market and distribution research, recruiting, 
selecting, contrasting, training and equipping salesmen, compensation plans, sales territories, 
quotas, sales promotion and sales policies. Three hours credit. 

147. Ban\ Administration 

This course deals with managerial problems of banks. Problems including organization, 
capital structure, earning power, supervision and regulation, examinations, call reports, and 
other regulatory matters are taken up. Open to Banking and Finance seniors, others with 
permission of the instructor. Three hours credit. 

152. Insurance 

The principles and practices underlying the more important types of industries as factors 

in private and business life. Three hours credit. 

Page Fifty-eight Spring Hill College 



174. Real Estate 

A course embracing a study of the economic, legal, and administrative principles of real 

property. Three hours credit. 

181. Time and Motion Study 

A course in the fundamentals of operation analysis, motion economy, time study, job stand- 
ards and industrial efficiency. Three hours credit. 

182. Manufacturing Industries 

A survey course in the technical factors and processes, peculiar business problems and 
economic characteristics of the leading manufacturing industries of the United States. Three 
hours credit. 

183. Industrial Management Problems 

This course includes a study of problems involving planning, layout, operation, administra- 
tion, wage incentive plans, industrial safety in the manufacturing plant; also included is a 
study of economic factors of production and the structure of industrial organization. Open 
to industrial management majors, others with permission of instructor. Three hours credit. 

186. Personnel Problems 

An analysis of the principles of selection, training, care, and administration of personnel, 
considered in the light of current attempts to solve employer-employee differences. Three 
hours credit. 

192. Business Problems 

This course is designed to train the student to solve varied business problems by drawing 
on his survey courses and research in the business library and current periodicals. Required 
of all business administration majors. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Three hours credit. 



ECONOMICS (Ec) 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

31. Introduction to Economics 

A brief analysis of economic principles designed for non-economic majors. Three hours 

credit. 

35-36. Principles of Economics 

This course is intended to give a thorough explanation of the laws and principles under- 
lying the economic system. It embraces a detailed analysis of production, distribution, ex- 
change and consumption. A prerequisite for all upper division courses in economics. Six 
hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

106. Money and Banking 

Designed to give the students a firm grasp of the economic principles and theories under- 
lying money, and the functions and operation of investment, commercial, and central bank- 
ing. Three hours credit. 

107. Monetary Theory 

An elementary investigation of the leading contributions of classical and contemporary 
monetary theorists. Three hours credit. 

110. Economics of Public Finance 

This course is directed to a practical knowledge of the principles and methods of govern- 
mental fiscal operations and policies. Three hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Fifty-nine 



112. Land Economics 

A survey of the principles of land utilization and the major problems arising therefrom. 
Three hours credit. 

122. Labor Economics 

Reviews social, economic, historical, and political factors significant to orientation in in- 
dustrial relations; analysis of main phases of industrial conflict with proposed solutions. 
Three hours credit. 

123. Labor Law 

Study of modern labor legislation which so deeply and so continously affects the problems 
of industrial relations. Three hours credit. 

124. Industrial Relations 

This course is designed to give the student a practical demonstration of union-management 
reltationships; the student is required to participate in actual bargaining conferences under 
the guidance of representative union and management leaders. Three hours credit. 

126. Economic History of the United States 

The economy of colonial America; commerce, agriculture and finance after 1789; the in- 
dustrial revolution; the westward movement; development of banking, transportation and 
labor; rise of the corporation; growth of foreign trade; the United States as a world eco- 
nomic power. Three hours credit. 

128. Statistics 

An introductory consideration of statistical theory; collection, presentation, analysis and in- 
terpretation of data; frequency distribution; time; measures of central tendency and 
dispersion; index numbers; correlation; forecasting. Three hours credit. 

134. International Trade 

This course is designated to give the student a foundation in the theories and operation 
of international commercial policy and practice, foreign investment and foreign exchange. 
Three hours credit. 

138-139. Economic Analysis 

A two semester course in intermediate economics embracing studies in demand and supply, 

marginal analysis. Six hours credit. 

145. Business Cycles 

Economic organization in its relation to the business fluctuations; indexes of business con- 
ditions; timing duration and amplitudes of cycles; international aspects; the problems of | 
forecasting and control. Three hours credit. 

153. History of Economic Thought 

An historical analysis of the development of Economic Theory. A study of the chief con- 
tributions of the Physiocrats, Adam Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, Say, Mill, Cairnes, Carey, 
Bastiat, Marx, Bohm-Bawerk, J. B. Clark, Marshall, and Veblen. Three hours credit. 

155. Contemporary Economic Problems 

The economic principles involved in the existing maladjustments will be considered in the 
light of current attempts to secure a solution. Three hours credit. 

156. Contemporary Economic Thought 

A survey of contemporary economic literature considering present school of economic 
thought, their points of difference and theoretical tendencies. Three hours credit. 

Page Sixty Spring Hill College 



EDUCATION (Ed) 



For information concerning Teacher Training the student is referred to the section of 
this Bulletin on Programs of Curricula. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

21. Introduction to Education 

An orientation course which surveys the field of education and of teacher training. Its 
objective is to provide the prospective teacher with an understanding of the personal and 
professional qualifications, relationships and responsibilities of the teacher. Three hours credit. 

31. History of Education 

A survey of educational theory, institutions and practice during ancient and modern times 
with special emphasis on the European system which influenced the more recent educa- 
tional movements in Europe and America. Three hours credit. 

32. History of Education in the U. S. 

This course begins with a study of the origin and development of the various school sys- 
tems, denominational and public, in the United States. Three hours credit. 

81. Philosophy of Education 

A study of the philosophichal principals underlying the different systems of education with 
a special emphasis on the Jesuit system. Three hours credit. 

82. Educational Psychology 

The student is directed in the study of the laws of learning, the learning curve, the effi- 
ciency and permanence of learning, transfer of training, the result of exercise, the measure- 
ment of achievement, the use of tests, the new type examinations. Three hours crdit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

111. Principles of High School Teaching 

Among the topics considered are: the aims in instruction, the classs exercise; the essentials 
of good questioning; the modes of instruction; the importance of study; the prelection or 
assignment; the repetition or recitation; standards and measurements; the individual and 
social elements in secondary instruction. Three hours credit. 

112. Statistical Methods in Education 

The purpose of the course is to acquaint teachers and prospective teachers with those 
statistical techniqes which are most important from the viewpoint of education. Three 
hours credit. 

135. Extra-Curricular Activities 

The purpose of this course is to instruct the students of education in the importance of 
student participation in school activities outside the classroom. Daily lecture and daily two- 
hour period of field work. Three hours credit. 

150. Co-operative Study of Secondary Schools 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the work accomplished by the Committee 
set up for the Co-operative Study of Secondary School Standards in order to establish the 
ground work for an appreciation and critical evaluation of the standards that should govern 
secondary schools. Three hours credit. 

161. Materials and Methods of Teaching English 

The organization of a balanced curriculum in English. Integration of High School English 

with college requirements. Three hours credit. 

166. Materials and Methods of Teaching History 

The object of this course is to give the student an intimate knowledge of the aim, methods, 

and contents of the history course in the high school. Three hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Sixty-one 



171. Materials and Methods of Teaching Science 

The course purports to evaluate the place of the natural sciences in the high school cur- 
riculum and study in survey the material that make up the science courses along with the 
methods best suited to achieve the aims of the science courses. Three hours: credit. 

176. Materials and Methods of Teaching Language 

A study of the contents and modern methods of presentation of the various modern lan- 
guages as well as the classical languages. Special emphasis is laid on the more recent 
methods of teaching Spanish and French. Three hours credit. 

181. Materials and Methods of Teaching Mathematics 

Current trends and problems in the teaching of mathematics in secondary schools, methods 
of selecting and organizing teaching materials, effective teaching procedures, diagnostic and 
remedial techniques. Three hours credit. 

183. Materials and Methods of Teaching Commercial Subjects 
A study and evaluation of the contents of various commercial courses as found in different 
school systems; a survey of the more advanced methods in the presentotion of commercial 
subjects; the place of the commercial subjects in the modern high school. Three hours credit. 

195-196. Observation and Practice Teaching 

Schedule to be arranged by each student individually with the head of the department of 
education. Candidates for degrees with a major in education must present a minimum of 
4 semester hours in observation and practice teaching with a minimum of 40 full periods of 
class teaching and 15 hours of observation. Four hours credit. 



ENGINEERING (Eg) 



The following courses, administered by the Department of Mathematics and Physics, 
are offered for students who wish to initiate their engineering training at Spring Hill. 

1. Introductory Geology 

A lecture course in the phenomena of dynamic and structural geology, illustrating external 
and internal geological agencies and processes with resulting land forms. Two hours credit. 

2. Surveying 

Theory, use and adjustment of instruments; methods of computation some practical field 
work and topographic map-making. Three hours credit. 

3-4. Engineering Drawing 

Lettering, geometrical construction, orthographic projection, dimensions. Four hours credit, j 

5. Descriptive Geometry 

Critical study of the science of drawing; location of points, lines and planes; single-curved 
surfaces; surfaces of revolution; tangent lines and planes; intersection of surfaces; shades 
and shadows; perspective. Prerequisite: Eg and 4 and solid geometry. Three hours credit. 

7. Introductory Engineering Problems 

Designed to determine the student's abilities, desires and shortcoming in work of an en- 
gineering nature, to aid the student in getting a better grasp of essential elementary mathe- 
matics, and to prepare him for handling better part of his first term of physics. Two hours 
credit. 

Page Sixty-two Spring Hill College 



ENGLISH (En) 

The student desiring to major in English must include in his program of studies En 
161 or 162 or 182 and at least 15 semester hours in other upper division courses, as ap- 
proved by the department chairman. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

FG. Fundamental Grammar and Usage 

A course in the essentials of grammar and correct usage. Required of Freshmen and other 
who may be dificient in the theory or practice of correct English. A no-credit course but 
satisfactory work on the part of those taking it is prerequisite to any other English credit. 

1-2. Freshman Composition 

An intensive study of the various forms of composition, with frequent practice in writing 
and the reading and analysis of models. Required of all Freshmen, unless excused by special 
permission. Six hours credit. 

31. Types of Prose 

A literary study of the chief types of prose writing, narrative and expository with modern 
examples preferred. A substitute for freshmen compostion in the case of superior entering 
students. Three hours credit. 

32. Poetry 

A course in the nature and elements of poetry, principles of versification. Reading, analysis 
and appreciation of selected poetry. Practice in verse writing. Three hours credit. 

33. Report Writing 

A study of the fundamentals of planning and writing special reports, particularly for busi- 
ness purposes; analysis of actual specimens for content, style and manner of presentation. 
Two lectures per week. Two hours credit. 

41. The Short Story 

The rise and development of this literary form. Extensive reading of great examples from 
world literature, with particular attention to the American short story. Analysis as well 
as composition required. Three hours credit. 

45. The Drama 

The theory of the drama will be studied and illustrated through historical examples, chiefly 
from English playwrights. Developments in play production will be studied as well as 
composition. Three hours credit. 

61-62. Survey of English Literature 

A study of the historical background of the chief masterpieces of English literature from 
Beowulf to Thomas Hardy. Readings in the principal authors, and critical papers at weekly 
intervals. Required of all A.B. Sophomores. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

132-133. Shakespeare 

Shakespeare's life, influence; source of his drama*, an acquaintance by reading and assign- 
ments with the Shakespearean literature of criticism; reading, analysis, and close study of 
six to twelve plays. Three to six hours credit. 

146. The Novel 

The principal purpose of this course is to study the technique of the novel, and the various 
schools of fiction. Reading of six selected novels, with special attention to literary and 
ethical critics. Three hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Sixty-three 



150. Aesthetics and Literary Criticism 

The philosophical basis of aesthetics, the elements of taste; theories of criticism; a survey 
of critical standards; a study of the schools of criticism, and of the work of the chief literary 
critics. Three hours credit. 

161. Newman 

A study of three of the English Cardinal's great works; The Idea of a University, The 
Present Position of Catholics in England and Apologia pro Vita Sua; detailed analysis of 
thought, and examination of literary merits. Three hours credit. 

162. Catholic Literary Revival 

A study of the chief figures in the modern literary resurgence stemming from Newman 
and his movement. Special emphasis on Hopkins and Chesterton. Three hours credit. 

181. Milton 

A survey course of the life and work of Milton, with special emphasis on the longer poems. 
Three hours credit. 

182. Chaucer 

A specialized study of the poet and of his works, with particular attention to the Canter- 
bury Tales. Three hours credit. 

185. Romantic Poets 

A specialized study of the five great Romantic Poets; Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, 

and Shelly. Philosophy and literary theory of the period. Three hours credit. 

188. Victorian Poets 

The most important movements and figures in poetry during the Victorian period, with 

detailed study of Browning and Tennyson. Three hours credit. 

191. American Literature 

A rapid survey of the chief American poets and prose writers of the Nineteenth Century. 

Three hours credit. 

195. Modern Literature 
A careful examination of the best writers in English and America who have risen to promi- 
nence since World War I. Three hours credit. 

199. Special Study of Advanced Students 
Two hours credit. 

HISTORY (Hs) 

Twelve semester hours of lower division work are prerequisite to upper division 
courses in History. The prerequisite courses are Hs 1-2, 51-52. The departmental adviser 
will guide the selection of advanced courses after the prerequisites have been fulfilled. 
To major in this department the student must complete in his major field twelve hours 
of lower division work and eighteen hours of upper division, and in his minor field 
twelve hour of lower division and four courses on an upper division level. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Western Civilization 

A brief survey of the development of European civilization. Six hours credit. 

11-12. European History I -II 

A survey of Western civilization from Christian antiquity to 1648. Six hours credit. 

21-22. European History III-IV 

A continuation of Western civilization from 1648 to the present. Prerequisite: Sophomore 

standing. Six hours credit. 

Page Sixty-four Spring Hill College 



51-52. The Americas 

A survey of the Western Hemisphere in its aboriginal and colonial background and 
culture; and a brief history of the American nations since independence. Prerequisite: Hs 
1-2 and Sophomore standing. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101-102. Classical Civilization 

A study of the political, economic, social and cultural civilization of Ancient Greece and 

Rome to the death of Constantine the Great. Six hours credit. 

111-112. Medieval Europe 

A study of medieval civilization from the decline of the Roman Empire to the Renais- 
sance. Six hours credit. 

121. Renaissance and Reformation 

The cultural and religous evolution of the transition period (1300-1648) between medieval 
and modern history. Three hours credit. 

122. Era of Revolution 

The revolutionary movement in Europe and America in the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries. Three hours credit. 

123. The Nineteenth Century 

A century of capitalism, liberalism, nationalism, and secularism growing out of the 
Napoleonic era and extending into the twentieth century. Three hours credit. 

124. The Contemporary World 

The two World Wars in their origin, progress and postwar problems. Three hours credit. 

131-132. English History 

A survey of English civilization from pre-historic times to the present. Six hours credit. 

133-134. English Constitutional History 

The Anglo-Saxon constitution, feudalism, Magna Charta, Common Law, parliamentary 
and cabinet systems, the rise of democracy, and English political theorists. Prerequisite: 
Hs 131-132. Six hours credit. 

141-142. American History 

A survey of United States history from colonial times to the present .Six hours credit. 

143-144. American Constitutional History 

The origin, content and development of the American Constitution and the major con- 
stitutional problems. Prerequisite: Hs 141-142. Three hours credit. 

145. American Diplomatic History 

A survey of United States foreign policy since 1778. Prerequisite: 141-142. Three hours 

credit. 

161-162. Latin American History 

A survey of the colonial and the national civilization of the Latin American countries. 

Six hours credit. 

181-182. Christian Civilization 

A survey of ecclesiastical history from Apostolic times to the present. Six hours credit. 

198. Special Study 

Credit and hours to be arranged by departmental adviser. 

Bulletin of Information Page Sixty-five 



MATHEMATICS (Mt) 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Fundamental Algebra 
This course is to be elected by students with deficient training. Three hours credit. 

2. Trigonometry 

Elements of plane trigonometry; this course together with the preceding will satisfy | 
minimum mathematics requirements for introductory science courses. Three hours credit. 

3. Algebra and Trigonometry 

A course in algebra and trigonometry designed primarily for science majors and engineer- 
ing students. Three hours credit. 

4. Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

A study of the usual topics of analytic geometry with an introduction to calculus. Three 
hours credit. 

Courses Mt 3 and 4, or their substantial equivalent, are prerequisite to further mathe- 
matics courses. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101-102. Calculus I-II 

Differentiation of transcendental functions with applications; formulas, methods and 
applications of integration; series; spaces coordinates and vectors; partial differentiation; 
multiple integration; applications. Six hours credit. 

131. Solid Analytic Geometry 

An exposition of the basic topics of space analytic geometry coordinated with the theory 

of vectors and matrices. Three hours credit. 

151. Differential Equations 

An elementary treatment of ordinary differential equations; simultaneous equations and 

linear differential equations; applications. Three hours credit. 

152 Vector Analysis 

An introduction to the algebra and calculus of vectors. Prerequisite: Mt 101. Three hours 

credit. 

155. Partial Differential Equations 

An introduction to partial differential equations; solution of simpler types; geometrical j 

and physical applications. Three hours credit. 

161. Advanced Calculus 

Special topics in ordinary differential equations including Laplace transform, numerical 

methods and series solutions, boundary value problems, vector analysis. Three hours credit, i 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS (Ms) 

1-2. Basic Course I 

Fundamentals of military discipline, drill and exercise of command military organization; 
military policy of the United States; evolution of warfare; maps and aerial photographs; | 
first aid and hygiene; individual weapons and rifle marksmanship; military problems | 
of the United States. Two class periods and one drill period per week for two semesters. I 
Two hours credit. 

3-4. Basic Course II 

Leadership, drill and exercise of command; and technique of the Transportation Corps j 
which includes introduction to Transportation Corps; economics of military transportation; 
military highway transport and highway organization and operation. Two class periods 
and one drill period per week for two semesters. Two hours credit. 

Page Sixty-six Spring Hill College • 



5-6. Advanced Course I 

Leadership, drill and exercise of command; 120 hours of tactics and technique of Trans- 
portation Corps to include individual weapons and marksmanship. Four class periods and 
one drill period per week during two semesters and attendance at a summer camp for six 
weeks following the Junior Year. Six hours credit. 

7-8. Advanced Course II 

Leadership, drill and exercise of command; military administration; military law; mili- 
tary teaching methods; psychological warfare; geographical foundations of national power; 
and 80 hours of Transportation Corps branch tactics and technique. Four class periods 
and one drill period per week for two semesters. Six hours credit. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 

The courses of the Department are in the French, German, and Spanish languages. The 
nature of the courses and their content are such as to secure the following sequence of 
objectives; a) A reading knowledge sufficient to fulfill the lower division objective in the 
field of modern language; b) A mastery of grammar and syntax, and an acquaintance with 
the elements of style as an immediate preparation for the study of literature. This objective 
will also include an ability to converse with correct pronunciation and natural inflexion; 
c) A knowldge and appreciation of the literature of the language d) An acquaintance with 
the history and culture of the people from which the language comes. 

Two year of lower division work or the equivalent will be required as a prerequisite 
to upper division courses. Majors and other students who take upper division courses in 
the Department of Modern Languages will be advised in the selection of courses by the 
Chairman. 



FRENCH (Fr) 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Elementary French 

The Article, the Noun, the Adjective, the Numerals, Pronouns, Conjugations of regular verbs 
and of the more common irregular verbs. Irregular verbs. Use of Moods and Tenses. Gov- 
ernment of Verbs. Order of words in the sentence. Frequent themes. Six hours credit. 

31-32. Intermediate French 

Review of Syntax, Prose Composition. Reading of graduated texts; Daudet, de Maupassant, 

Coppee, Bourget. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

111-112. Survey of French Literature 1-11 

An anthology study of chief literary masterpieces in chronological order. Six hours credit. 

131-132. The French Novel 

A detailed study of different types of the French novel; Classical, Romantic, Realistic and 
Contemporary, with reference to theme, characters, treatment, and style. Three hours credit. 

141. The French Drama 

A study of the technique of the French drama. Special stress will be laid on the classical 
tragedy, Racine and Corneille. Three hours credit. 

142. The French Comedy 

A reading course with special attention to the works of Moliere. Three hours credit. 

153. Lyric Poets of the Nineteenth Century 

A specialized study of the romantic movement as illustrated in the poetry of Hugo, Musset, 

Vigney and Lamartine. Three hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Sixty-seven 



181. The Catholic Renaissance 

Study of the growing influence of Catholic religious thought in the prose and poetry of 

modern France, up to and including Claudel and Maritain. Three hours credit. 

199. Seminar for Advanced Students 

Special readings for advanced training. Three hours credit. 



GERMAN (Gr) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Elementary German 

A systematically progressive course designed to give the student facility in reading simple 

German. Elements in phonetics and grammar. Six hours credit. 

31-32. Intermediate German 

This study is based on comprehensive readings of modern prose with special emphasis on 

vocabulary building, idioms, and grammar review. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

111-112. Advanced German 

Advanced composition. Survey of the history of German literature. Six hours credit. 

124. Scientific German 

Course is designed to give facility in reading periodicals in German. Three hours credit. 

131-132. German Drama 

Technique of the drama in German, with special study of Goethe and Schiller. Two semes- 
ters. Six hours credit. 

141-142. The German Novel 

A reading course in the modern novel. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 



SPANISH (Sp) 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Elementary Spanish 

Phonetics; pronunciation, accentuation, punctuation, capitalization. Rules governing nouns, 
adjectives and pronouns. Regular Verbs, Auxiliary Verbs: ser, estar, haber. Reading and 
drill in easy conversation. Study of irregular verbs, reflexive verbs, orthographic changing 
verbs. The subjunctive in independent and subordinate clauses. Reading and translation 
of easy stories. Six hours credit. 

31-32. Intermediate Spanish 

An introduction to Spanish Prose, Reading, with a review of basic rules of grammar. 
Vocabulary building, Spanish word order, idiomatic expressions, reading aids, key words. 
Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

111. Spanish History 

The fascinating story of a country that has colonized half of the Western World, and at 
one time or another has held dominion over more than half of the present territory of 
the United States. An introduction to Spanish literature and civilization. Three hours credit. 

112. Don Quijote 

The life and works of Cervantes, with special stress on Don Quijote, the supreme master- 
piece of Spanish literature. A study of the content of the story, character portrayals, humor, 
style. Three hours credit. 

Page Sixty-eight Spring Hill College 



131. The Golden Age 

The period of literature covering the last part of the Fifteenth Century, and extending to 
the end of the Seventeenth Century, the period in which Spanish culture attains its highest 
development. Three hours credit. 

132. Advanced Composition 

Study of Spanish models with a view to composition in imitation. Reading magazines and 
newspapers. Three hours credit. 

MUSIC (Mu) 

Courses in music are administered by the Department of English. The objectives of the 
music program are (a) to provide the instruction necessary for understanding and appre- 
ciating music as a fine art; (b) to present music as a means of broadening and enriching 
cultural life; (c) to stimulate interest in the sacred music of the Catholic Church and to 
disseminate fuller knowledge and appreciation of it; (d) to provide opportunities for par- 
ticipation in various musical organizations. 

The College offers no major in music nor the extensive training necessary for full 
professional musicianship. However, courses are offered in theoretical and applied music, 
both instrumental and vocal, as electives towards an academic degree. Students may select 
music as a minor with the approval of the Dean. For a minor eighteen hours are required, 
at least eight of which must be in Theory. In Applied Music a minimum of six hours credit 
must be gained from courses taught by private lessons in instrument or voice. A maximum 
of four hours credit will be given for satisfactory ensemble work in Applied Music, pro- 
vided the student is registered at the same time in a course in Theory. Approval by the 
instructor is required for admission into any course in music. Choir members must be 
registered in the course in Liturgical Music to gain credit for their ensemble work. Private 
lessons are taught either for one hour or two half hour periods a week. Beginners may 
take private lessons, but not for credit. Instruments other than piano and organ must be 
furnished by the student. 

I THEORY 

1. Elementary Harmony 

An integrated study of the harmonic basis of music. Emphasis on analytical harmony 

from perspective of hearing and understanding rather than of composing. Two hours credit. 

3-4. Appreciation of Music 

A study of the elements necessary for intellectual enjoyment and appreciation of music. 
Principles of melody, rhythm, harmony, and tone color. Study of structure and forms. 
Symphonies, operas, and concertos analyzed and explained. Recordings played in the Music 
room two hours a week. One hour of lecture. Four hours credit. 

5. History of Music 

A survey of the development of music from ancient to modern times with special emphasis 
on the classical and romantic schools. Two hours credit. 

6. Gregorian Chant 

The theory of Gregorian Chant or Plainsong. Neums, modes, chironomy. Syllabic and 
melismatic chants. Psalmody. Recordings studied. Practical vocal study of important chants. 
Two hours credit. 

151-152. Liturgical Music 

The traditions and ideals of the sacred music of the Catholic Church. The aesthetics of 

sacred music as presented in the Motu Proprio of Pius X and in other ecclesiastical legis- 

[ lation. Evaluation of Gregorian, polyphonic, and modern music. Study of the recording by 

I the Solesmes monks and the Sistine choir. Required of all choral students to gain credit 

I in choir section of ensemble music. Four hours credit. 

J Bulletin of Information Page Sixty-nine 



II APPLIED MUSIC 
A. Private Lessons 



11-12. Intermediate Piano 

Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 

15-16. Voice 

Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 

21-22. Organ Studies 

Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 

25-26. String or Wind Instrument 
Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 

111-112. Advanced Piano 

Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 

115-116. Advanced Vocal Studies 
Weekly Private Lessons. Four hours credit. 



B. Ensemble 



17-18. Glee Club 

Group work. One hour credit. 

19-20. Choir 

Group work. One hour credit. 

27-28. Band 

Group work. One hour credit. 

29-30. Orchestra 

Group work. One hour credit. 



PHILOSOPHY (PI) 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

I. Introduction to Scholasticism 

The sources of the scholastic system. Relation of philosophy to science and to faith. Prin- 
cipal tenets of scholasticism. One hour credit. 

II. Dialectics 

The laws of thought; idea and the term; judgment and the proposition; reasoning and the 
syllogism. Fallacies. Methodology. Two hours credit. 

30. Epistemology 

A specialized study of the truth of thought, skepticism, methodic doubt; the criteria of 
certitude, and the problem of error. Four hours credit. 

31. Logic and Critics 

A rapid survey of dialectics, with exercises in reasoning, followed by a study of the truth 
of thought, the sources of cognition, and the criteria of certitude. Three hours credit. 

32. General Metaphysics 

A rapid survey of chief theses in ontology and cosmology, particularly as they affect the 
philosophy of science. Three hours credit. 

Page Seventy Spring Hill College 



33-34. Cosmology 

A specialized study of the properties of bodies; extension, inertia, activity; the laws of 
nature, possibility of miracles; the ultimate constitution of bodies. Metaphysical nature and 
properties of quality, motion, time and space. Six hours credit. 

35. Ontology 

A specialized study of being, its primary determinations and transcendental attributes; the 
various concepts of substance and accident. Individuality and personality; relation and 
cause. Four hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100. Sense Psychology 

A study of sense perception, imagination, memory; the sensuous appetite, movement, and 
feeling. Three hours credit. 

101. Rational Psychology 

The study of phenomena of rational life, intellectual concepts, rational appetency, free will, 
and determination. Origin, nature and destiny of the human soul. Three hours credit 

131. Psychology 

The human intellect and its proper object; its spirtiualiy proved by its acts; origin of ideas; 
innate ideas. Empiricism and Ontologism rejected. The human will and its formal object; 
its freedom, its control of the other faculties. Nature of the human soul; a substantial 
principle, simple, spirtual, immortal, its union with the body; its origin. The unity and 
antiquity of the human race. Three hours credit. 

140-141. Natural Theology 

A specialized study of the proofs for God's existence and of the extent of our human 

knowledge of God's essence and attributes. Six hours credit. 

142. Special Metaphysics (Theodicy) 

Proofs for the existence of God; the validity of human knowledge about the divine nature; 
God's infinity, simplicity, uniqueness, immutability, eternity, immensity and omnipresence; 
the operative attributes, intellect and will, creation; providence and the problem of evil. 
Three hours credit. 

161. History of Ancient Philosophy 

Oriental Philosophy; the Greeks; Socrates, Plato, Aristotle. The Gnostics and Neoplatonists. 
The early Fathers of the Church. Medieval Philosophy. The rival schools and tendencies 
among the Scholastics. The Thomistic synthesis. Two hours credit. 

162. History of Modern Philosophy 

Descartes and his followers; Malabranche, Locke, Hume, Voltaire and the Encyclopaedists, 
Leibnitz Sensists and the Scottish School. The Transcendentalists: Kant, Fichte, Schelling 
and their school of thought. The Neo-Kantians, Neo-Scholasticism and the present outlook. 
Two hours credit. 

180. Ethics for Nurses 

General principles of ethics; duties to self and to fellow man; family obligations; profes- 
sional obligations; obligations to civil authority; religion and morality. Three hours credit. 

181. General Ethics 

The ultimate end of man. The existence of objective morality. Constituents of the moral 
order. Eternal and natural law. Nature of obligation. Three hours credit. 

182. Special Ethics 

Particular rights and duties. Duty of natural religion; of self-preservation; of veracity. The 
right of self-defense; of property. The social relations of man. Conjugal society. Civil 
society. State and Education. International law. Three hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Seventy-one 



197. Texts of Saint Thomas 

A course in the background and interpretation of selected texts of St. Thomas. Two hours 
credit. 

198. Texts of Aristotle 

A course in the background and interpretation of selected texts of Aristotle. Two hours 
credit. 

199. Seminar for Advanced Students 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Pe) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Freshman Physical Education 

Freshmen (non-veterans) must participate in organized gymnasium activities, competition 

on varsity level will suffice. One hour credit. 

5. First Aid 

Course in the teaching of safety and of useful emergency techniques. One hour credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

For Juniors and Seniors who are in Teacher-training Wor\. 

103. Introduction to Physical Education 

Brief discussion of purposes and aims of education, in particular physical education; intro- 
duction to physical education. Three hours credit. 

104. Health and Safety Education 

Individual health and safety; fundamental techniques. Three hours credit. 

105. Principles, Organizations and Administration of Secondary School 
Physical Education Program 

A discussion of proper programs for high schools, and of the administration of interscho- 
lastic and intramural athletics and a physical education program. Three hours credit. 

106. Principles and Practice of Advanced Coaching 

Instruction in coaching of football, basketball and baseball with practica experience in 
coaching grammar school teams. Three hours credit. 

107. Theory and Practice of Physical Education 

This course includes playing of varsity basketball or baseball; may be taken twice. Three 
hours credit. 



PHYSICS (Ph) 

To satisfy the requirements for a major in Physics the student must complete 15 
hours of lecture courses on an upper division level and at least three hours of laboratory 
work including Ph 133-134. Mt 101-102 is a prerequisite for upper division courses in 
physics. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. General Physics 7-7/ 

Introduction to essential features of classical physics including laboratory work. Prerequisites: 

Mt 1 and 2 or their equivalent (concurrent registration not permitted). Eight hours credit: 

11. Introductory Physics 

Survey of classical physics including some laboratory work to give the student a general 

background in this science. Four hours credit. 

Page Seventy-two Spring Hill College 



71-72. Mechanics 

Extensive introduction to mechanics to supplement content of Ph 1 for engineering students 

and physical science majors. Prerequisite: Registration in Mt 101. Four hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100. Special Problems in Physics 

Presentation of physical problems which have philosophical significance. Three hours 

credit. 

131-132. Electricity and Magnetism 1-11 

Treatment on intermediate level of electrical properties of matter and electromagntism. 

This course must be accompanied by Ph 133-134. Six hours credit. 

133-134. Electrical Measurements I-II 

An advancd student laboratory in electrical measurements. Two hours credit. 

141. Optics 

Introduction to topics in physical optics. Three hours credit. 

142. Introduction to Modern Physics 

Introduction to fundamental theories of modern physics. Three hours credit. 

143. Heat 

Treatment on intermediate level of problems in heat and elementary thermodynamics. 
Three hours credit. 

151-152. Experimental Physics I-Il 

An advanced laboratory course for senior students. Credit to be arranged. 

161. Theoretical Physics 

A mathematical study of certain problems in mechanics and electricity. Three hours credit. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE (Po) 

Courses in this field are administered by the Department of History and Social 
Sciences. Twelve semester hours of lower division work are prerequisite to upper divi- 
sion courses in Political Science. The prerequisite courses and Po 1-2, 11-12. The depart- 
mental adviser will guide the selection of advanced courses after the prerequisitions have 
been fulfilled. To major in Political Science the student must complete in his major 
field twelve hours of lower division work and eighteen hours of upper division, and 
in his minor field twelve hours of lower division and four courses on upper division 
level. 

The following courses are acceptable toward fulfiling the requirements of a major 
in Political Science: Ec 110: Economics of Public Finance; Hs 133-134: English Con- 
stitutional History; Hs 143-144: American Constitutional History; Hs 145: American 
Diplomatic History. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Survey of Government 

A survey of American and of comparative governments. Six hours credit. 

11. Principles of Political Science 

The nature, organization, function and international position of the state; the basic 
principles of constitutionalism and totalitarianism. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and 
Po 1-2. Three hours credit. 

12. Democratic Institutions 

The evolution of democratic social and political institutions and their diffusion, character- 
istics and problems. Prerequisite: Po 11. Three hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Seventy-three 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

121. Public Administration 

The principle, structure, organization and problems of public service, and the relation 

of government to economic and social agencies. Three hours credit. 

181-182. History of Political Thought 

A development of the world's foremost political philosophers from Plato to the present. 

Six hours credit. 

198. Special Study 

Credit and hours to be arranged by the departmental adviser. 

PSYCHOLOGY (Ps) 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

131. General Psychology 

The normal functioning of the mind. Proper object of the intellect. Origin of ideas. Nature 

and relationship of the various faculties of the soul. Three hours credit. 

134. Experimental Psychology 

The methods and typical results of the experimental psychology of sensation, perception, 
emotion, memory, imagination, habit, thought, volition, the relation of consciousness to its 
object. Four hours credit. 

142. Abnormal Psychology 

Relation of the abnormal to normal in psychology. Present-day conception of mental dis- 
orders. The chief types. Remote causes; inherited emotional instability, environment. Proxi- 
mate or precipitating causes. Detailed study of examples of major classifications. Treat- 
ment. Three hours credit. 



RELIGION (Rl) 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

31-32. Christian Apologetics 

Revelation and the Church of Christ. The study of Christianity as a revealed religion. 
Divine institution of the Church. Marks of the Church. Its end and constitution. Required 
of all Catholic Freshmen. Two semesters. Four hours credit. 

61. Moral Guidance 

The Catholic Theory of Morality. The Fundamental obligations of the Christian. Detailed 
study of the first three commandments with application to practical cases. One semester. 
Required of all Catholic Sophomores. Two hours credit. 

62. The Commandments 

A detailed study of the last seven comandments and the precepts of the Church. A 
special consideration of the duties and obligations peculiar to the various professions. One 
semester. Required of Catholic Sophomores. Two hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

131-132. Catholic Dogma 

The nature of God; Creation and elevation of Man; Original sin; the Incarnation; the Re- 
demption. Special emphasis is given to the Scriptural texts that illustrate these truths. Two 
semesters. Required of all Catholic Juniors. Four hours credit. 

141. The Sacraments 

On advanced study of the meaning and value of the Catholic Sacramental System. A de- 
tailed study of the first six Sacraments and their place in the Catholic laymen's spiritual 
life. One semester. Required of all Catholic Seniors. Two hours credit. 

Page Seventy-four Spring Hill College 



142. Christian Marriage 

Catholic doctrine on the morality of sex. The Sacrament of Matrimony. Premarital chastity. 
Prenuptial requirements. Rights, duties and graces of married couples. One semester. Re- 
quired of all Catholic Seniors. Two hours credit. 

150. Christian Life and Worship 

An advanced study of the Catholic liturgy. The Grace-life at work in true Christian wor- 
ship. One semester. Two hours credit. 

Special Courses for Non-Catholic Students 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

13-14. Comparative Religion 

Definition and division of religions. A general history of the world's great religions with 
stress on the common factors and characteristic differences. Required of non-Catholic Fresh- 
men and Sophomores. Given odd years. Four hours credit. 

33-34. Biblical Criticism 

The notion of inspiration- Application to the Books of the New Testament. Method and 
spirit of higher criticism. Historical value of the New Testament. Difficulties answered. 
Required of non-Catholic Freshmen and Sophomores. Given even years. Four hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

137-138. Catholic Beliefs 

A course designed to give the student an intelligent understanding of and acquaintance 
with characteristic points of Catholic teaching and practice. Required of non-Catholic Jun- 
iors and Seniors. Given odd years. Four hours credit. 

143-144. Christian Morals 

The obligation of morality; basis in reason and aids from faith; practical applications. Re- 
quired of non-Catholic Juniors and Seniors. Given even years. Four hours credit. 



SOCIOLOGY (So) 

The courses listed below are administered through the Department of History and 
Social Sciences. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Introductory Sociology 

An analytical study of the structure of society; primary and secondary communities and 
associations; temporary formations; social processes; social stability and social change. Three 
hours credit. 

2. Social Problems and Agencies 

A study of some of the more important social problems; the agencies of control; solutions 
to problems in conformity with sound sociological principles. Three hours credit. 

21. Introduction to Public Health 

A survey course on the development of the science of public health, including the principles 
of sanitation and communicable disease control, public health organization and administra- 
tion; the relation of personal hygiene to public health. Primarily a course for nurses. Three 
hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

115. Culture History 

A study of the beginning and development of culture, especially among extant primitive 

people. Two hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Seventy-five 



121. Social Case Wor\ 

A study of the philosophy, methods, processes and ethical aspects of case work. Three 

hours credit. 

131. Social History: Social Origins 

A study of primitive societal institutions, domestic, economic, political and religious. Three 
hours credit. 

132. Social History: History of Social Wor\ 

A study of the historical development of social work from Grecian and Roman practice 
to modern era. Three hours credit. 

141. Social Problems: Communism 

A critical study of Russia's strategy and tactics from the Bolshevik Revolution to the 

present. Three hours credit. 

143. Christian Social Order 

A study of the ideal social order as delineated in the Papal Enclyclicals, Rerum Novarum 
and Quadragesimo Anno. Rejection of the opposite extremes of collectivism and rugged 
individualism. Three hours credit. 

151. The Family 

A study of the bonds of membership, interaction, functions, coordination of family; changes 
and variations in families; the integration and disintegration of family life; the extra- 
familial influences on family. Three hours credit. 

152. The State and International Relations 

Various theories regarding the origin of civil authority and the state; the various types of 
states; the functions of the state; the coordinating bodies within the state; international 
society; war and means of promoting peace. Three hours credit. 

153. Social Problems: Crime and Delinquency 

A study of the extent, causes and cures of crime, the agencies of the police system; institu- 
tions of correction. Three hours credit. 



SPEECH (Ex) 

The courses in speech are administered by the Department of English. No speech course, 
however, will be accepted in the Department of English as a substitute for any English 
course. A minor in speech is permitted. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Basic Principles of Speech 

A study of the basic principles of speech; platform manner; voice control; qualities of a 

good speech; factors of attention; ends of speech; wording the speech; delivery. Four hours 

credit. 

3. Types of Speech 

The speech to entertain; to inform; to impress; to convince; to stimulate; to persuade; to 
actuate. Three hours credit. 

4. Occasional Address 

After-dinner speaking; speeches of courtesy; speeches of acceptance; delivery of reports; 
presenting ideas. Three hours credit. 

5. Classroom Speech 

This course is intended for those training to become teachers. A study of the teacher's 
speech problem; the vocal mechanism; a study of language; speech pathology; the art of 
speaking. Three hours credit. 

Page Seventy-six Spring Hill College 



6. Business Speech 

A course planned for students in the department of commerce, with emphasis on the short 

business report. Three hours credit. 

10. Parliamentary Law 

Study and application of Robert's Rules of Order. Two hours credit. 

31. Debating and Argumentation 

The principles of debating; propositions; briefing; logical reasoning; fallacies; refutation. 
Two hours credit. 

32. Principles of Discussion 

Principles of group discussion; panels; forums; formal and informal discussion. Three hours 
credit. 

33. Extemporaneous Speaking 

The art of extemporaneous speaking; essentials of speaking without preparation. Three 
hours credit. 

34. Radio Speaking 

The occasional radio address; emphasis on the difference between speaking before a visible 
audience and a mike. Three hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101. Advanced Debating and Discussion 

Emphasis on actual debating and discussion. Study of the world's great debates and dis- 
cussions. Three hours credit. 

103. Advanced Radio Speaking 

Newcasts; spot-commercials; live-talent shows; transcribed and recorded programs; special 

events. Three hours credit. 

105. Dramatic Readings 

Oral interpretation of the printed word; short plays; readings. Three hours credit. 



Bulletin of Information Page Seventy-seven 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



May 23, 1950 



Bachelor of Arts 



Charles John Boyle 

cum laude 

Paul J. McCarthy, S.J. 

Francis Xavier Moan, S.J. 

William Warren Nolan 

Charles Edwards O'Neill, S.J. 



Joseph Wilton Sellers 

Walter Cornelius Shea Jr. 

Joseph Henry Stodder 

Hilliard Francis Stiegler, S.J. 

John Robert Welsh S.J. 



Bachelor of Science 



Tom R. Averett, Jr. 

David A. Azar 

Thomas Lorren Barrineau 

Norman Jack Berger 

Hector Carlos Buitrago 

Romolo Arthur Cannamela 

John Henry Carlin 

Francis E. Conmay 

Frederick Paris Coogan, Jr. 

William Kevin Daly 

William Dennis Durick 

cum laude 
Edwin Menahan Fuchs 

Andrew Joe Garcia 
Richard P. Gideon, Jr. 
Joel Walker Goldsby, III 
Richard Joseph Hebert 
John Fielden Kennedy 
Martin Reymond Koch 
Robert William Latham 

William H. Lee, Jr. 

William Herbert Leech 

Douglas Joseph Lemoine 

George Washington Lewis, Jr. 

William Horace Lindsey, Jr. 

Lloyd Anthony Lorio, S.J. 
William Henry McBride, S.J. 

Page Seventy-eight 



William Michael McManus 

William James McQuillen 

Manuel Enrique Martinez 

John Daniel Mese 

Levi Thomas Monica 

Frederick T. Murphy 

Walter Joseph Nee, S.J. 

John Louis Olivier 

William Henderson Ollinger 

Gerald Pichard 

Arthur Edward Pierce, Jr. 

John Wesley Rabby 

Lucius Benton Ramsey 

Robert Thaddeus Roberts 

Melvin Bernard Rotner 

Frank Michael Ruscitto 

Robert Marion Schneider 

John Barber Simms 

cum laude 

Robert Meredith Spanyer 

James Robert Steiner 

James W. Suarez 

Samuel W. Suhrer 

John Francis Sullivan 

Charles McManus Talbott 

Arthur Stevens Tew 
Edgar Joseph Tiblier, S.J. 

Spring Hill College 



Bachelor of Science in Commerce 



William Costello Baker 

Michael Loftin Bethany 

Paul Howard Boudreaux 

William Fleming Browne, Jr. 

Frank Keene Bunkley, Jr. 

John A. Calametti, Jr. 

John A. Davis 

John August Deimel 

William Stapleton Doolan 

James Navarro Duncan 

Joseph Allen Fearn 

Angelo Louis Greco, Jr. 

Joseph Anthony Haskins 

Daniel J. Hurley 

Paul Douglas Johnson 

John James Kelly 

Marshall Joseph Langan, Jr. 

Robert Edward Lee 

William Daniel Lenz, Jr. 

cum laude 



Joseph Patrick McCabe 

Emanuel T. McEvoy, Jr. 

Joseph M. McMillan 

John A. Markwalter 

Walter Eugene Mason 

Donald Arthur Nobert 

John Moore O'Neil 

Arthur Robert Outlaw 

Thomas Earl Page 

Edward McColl Peresich 

John Edwin Rhem 

Alfred Godfray Robichaux, Jr. 

Floyd Edgar Roel 

Joseph Fleetwood Smith 

Gustav John Stahl 

Alton D. Tanner 

Harvell Bernard Taylor 

Francis H. Thompson 

Robert Mark Tremmel 

Claude H. Willis, Jr. 



July 21, 1950 

Bachelor of Arts 



John O. Chavez, S.J. 

Ewert Hilary Cousins, S.J. 

Edward D. DeRussey, S.J. 

Thomas M. Kelley, S.J. 

Patrick H. Koch, S.J. 



Thomas J. Madden, S.J. 

Nicholas T. Schiro, S.J. 

Joseph F. Sweeney, S.J. 

John L. Vessels, S.J. 



Bachelor of Science 



Brother Lee Barker, S.C. 

Joseph Maurice Bonin 

Brother Glenn Brou, S.C. 

Brother Faber Chinery, S.C. 

Robert Charles Clawson 

Juan Octavio Cuevas 

John Daniel Edwards 

Frank Eugene Gray, Jr. 

Sister Mary Benigna Hunt, R.S.M. 

Ray Carl Lauten, Jr. 

Clarence Joseph LeBlanc, Jr. 

Thomas Joseph Lynch 

Brother Mel McLinskey, S.C. 

Robert Moore McCown 

James Paul Martin 

John A. Miklic 



Ella Davidson Morris 

summa cum laude 

William I. Mullins 

Charles Lawrence O'Brien 

Brother Evan Peabody, S.C. 

Florence Clarke Repp 

Theodore F. Robinson 

Joseph Edward Rowley 

James Robert Skidmore 

James Frederick Stanley 

John Trachy Tew 

Robert Anthony Tonne 

Edward Joseph Weber, Jr. 

Charles Fox White 

John Patrick Wilson 



bulletin of Information 



Page Seventy-nine 



Bachelor of Science in Commerce 

John McKennon Andrews Robert Francis Lilly 

Franklin J. Coleman Jesse Cleve Thomas, Jr. 

Albert Rene Florez Manuel Tuero, Jr. 

William Matthews Hall Joseph Henry Wilson, Jr. 



Page Eighty Spring Hill College 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



REGULAR SESSION (1950-51) 



FULL TIME STUDENTS 



(Explanation of Code: A — arts; N — natural sciences; S — social sciences; C — commerce; 
1 — freshman; 2 — sophomore; 3 — junior; 4 — senior; 5 — post-graduate; a code symbol com- 
pounded from preceding appears in parentheses after the student's name in the following 
list.) 



ADAMS, C. F., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Albright, G. R., S.J. (N4) 

Plymouth, Mich. 
Allen, F. H., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Alonzo, R. T., Jr., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Amorosi, J. T., (S4) 

Jersey City, N. J. 
Ardoin, J. L., (Nl) 

Eunice, La. 
Armistead, W. R., (Nl) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Avellino, Marshall, (S4) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
BAGGETT, J. L., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bahlinger, M. J., S.J., (A3) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Baisden, R. L., (N2) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Ball, J. A., (SI) 

Loretto, Ky. 
Ball, J. D., (C2) 

Loretto, Ky. 
Ball, Thomas N., (C2) 

Loretto, Ky. 
Barrett, George E., (S3) 

Nashville, Tenn. 
Barter, C. J., (N3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Barton, H. H., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Batchelor, W. B., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bankhead, J. C, (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 



Bauler, R. J., (S4) 

Wheaton, 111. 
Beatty, A. H., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bedsole, E., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Benitez, Ray A., (N3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Benson, D. R., (S2) 

Birmingham, Ala. 
Berte, J., S.J., (N4) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Berte, J. J., (N2) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Beshara, Bro. F., (N3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Best, H. L., Jr., (CI) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Bibb, J. T., (N3) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Bingham, J., S.J., (A4) 

Long Island, N. Y. 
Bishop, Bro. B., (C2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Bishop, Paul, (N4) 

Elizabeth, N. J. 
Blackburn, G. J. (CI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Bolletieri, N. J., (S2) 

Pelham, N. Y. 
Boiling, F., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Boiling, M. J., Ill, (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bordelon, Bro. K., (A2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Bosarge, J., (N3) 

Prichard, Ala. 



Bosarge, W., (C2) 

Bayou La Batre, Ala. 
Boucher, Bro. E., (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Boucher, Bro. J. M., (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Bourne, Alvin E., (SI) 

Clewiston, Fla. 
Bower, W. T., (C4) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Boyce, Bro. P., (Al) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Bradley, F. E., Jr., (S4) 

Moncks Corner, S. C. 
Bradley, F. W., (S4) 

Hickman Mills, Mo. 
Bradley, W. J., Ill, (N4) 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Brady, Charles A., (Al) 

Chicago, 111. 
Brady, David, (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Brady, E. J., S.J., (N3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Brady, J. D., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Brannon, E. J., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Braquet, A. J„ S.J., (A3) 

Kaplan, La. 
Breault, Bro. M., (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Brennan, T., (CI) 

Milwaukee, Wise. 
Brennan, W., S.J., (N4) 

San Matio, Calif. 
Broadus, J. C, (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Eighty-one 



Bronson, M. N., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Brown, B. R., Jr., (Nl) 

Dallas, Texas 
Brown, J. R., Jr., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Browning J. P., (N4) 

Hot Springs, Ark. 
Bubb, R. L., (Nl) 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Buchanan, J. J., (A4) 

Pontiac, Mich. 
Buckley, Bro. A., (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Buckley, P. T., Jr., (Nl) 

Jackson, Miss. 
Burroughs, C. K., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Burt, J., (N3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Byrd, J. C, (C3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
CADY, EDWIN E., (CI) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Callahan, R. D., (S3) 

Burgenfield, N. J. 
Callan, J. P., (SI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Cameron, C. E,, (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Campbell, M. N., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Campbell, P. F. X., (Nl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Carey, Hugh, (Nl) 

Houston, Texas 
Carmody, T. J., Jr., (SI) 

Winnetka, 111. 
Carrazza, J. A., Jr. (N4) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Carroll C. R. (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Carroll, W. J., (Nl) 

Chicago, 111. 
Carter, J. C, S.J., (N4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Carter, R. J., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Carter, T. F., (SI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Caruso, C. J., (N3) 

Greenville, Miss. 
Carwie, J., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cassidy, L. D., (S4) 

Clayton, Mo. 
Castelin, R. G., (S3) 

Bayou La Batre, Ala. 
Chavez, J. O., S.J., (A5) 

Albuquerque, N. M. 
Cimino, R. D., (Nl) 

Tampa, Fla. 

Page Eighty-two 



Clark, B. E., (A4) 

Louisville, Ky. 
Clarke, W. A., (S2) 

Bowling Green, Ky. 
Clarke, W. E., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cleary, W. F., (CI) 

W. Palm Beach, Fla. 
Clerkin, R. R. (S3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Cloney, R. D., S.J., (N4) 

New Gardens, N. Y. 
Cloonan, Bro. Stephen, (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Coakley, J. A., (C4) 

Wyncote, Pa. 
Cochran, J. A., (C4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Cohen, H. F., S.J. 

New Orleans, La. 
Colacurcio, R. D., (SI) 

Jersey City, N. J. 
Colbert, T. F., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Cole, W. O., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Coles, E. T., S.J., (C5) 

Shreveport, La. 
Collins, H. J., Jr., (C4) 

Dallas, Texas 
Collins, L. A., ((N2) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Comiskey, G., (S2) 

New Orleans, La. 
Connell, R. C, (S3) 

Racine, Wise. 
Connolly, J. F., (N3) 

Newark, N. J. 
Connolly, F. A., (S4) 

Jersey City, N. J. 
Connolly, Bro. R., (Nl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Connor, R. B., (C3) 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Cooper, H. W., (Nl) 

Paterson, N. J. 
Coughlin, L. V., Jr. (SI) 

Memphis, Tenn. 
Cousins, E., S.J., (A5) 

New Orleans, La. 
Covan, J. E., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Coyle, C. G., Jr., (S2) 

New Orleans, La. 
Cratin, Paul D., (N4) 

Sherrill, Ark. 
Creagan, D. A., S.J., (A4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Creel, L. S., Jr. (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cruthirds, J. A., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Cummins, J. F., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cush, C. J., (N3) 

Shreveport, La. 
Cush, M. E., (C2) 

Shreveport, La. 
DALY, T. F., (S3) 

Pelham, N. Y. 
D'Amato, N., (N2) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Daniels, D., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Danne, W. C, Jr. (CI 

Chicago, 111. 
Dantzler, J. A., (S3 

Mobile, Ala. 
Darby, F. F., Jr., (N4) 

Arnaudville, La. 
Daugherty, H. G., (C3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Dean, W. C, (S2) 

Milwaukee, Wise. 
Davis, James B., (SI) ■ 

Mobile, Ala. 
Debarros, J. F., (S2) 

New Orleans, La. 
Deeves, J. F., S.J., (N4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Degnan, J. P., (SI) 

Memphis, Tenn. 
Degnan, J. E., (A3) 

Maiden, Mass. 
deLage, C. J. B., IV, (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Delaney, J. D., (Cl) 

Rockville Centre, N. Y. 
Denton, L., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
DeRussy, E., S.J., (N5) 

New Orleans, La. 
Desmond, D. J., (S2) 

Milwaukee, Wise. 
Dever, D. J., (N2) 

Miami Beach, Fla. 
Devine, J. F., S.J., (N4) 

Melrose Park, Pa. 
Dewine, J. F., (S2) 

Cleveland Hghts, Ohio 
Diaz, M. A., (N2) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Dickinson, W. R., (Nl) 

Evanston, 111. 
Dickson, W. P., (C4) 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Diez, C, Jr. (,S3) . 

Tampa, Fla. 
Dinnean, R. F., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Doerfler, L. J., (SI) 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Doiron, J. R., Jr., (C2) 

Baton Rouge, La. 

Spring Hill College 



Dolan, Bro. R., (S4) 
Spring Hill, Ala. 
Donahue, J. F., (C4) 

Plainville, Conn. 
Donovan, J. F., Jr., (SI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Dorn, K. G., (C4) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Downey, W. J., (C3 

Chicago, 111. 
Drago, Arthur, (S5) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Dretzka, R. J., (Si) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Duff, D. F., (N3) 

Little Rock, Ark. 
Dughi, C. H., (C3) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Duke, V. E., (Nl) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
duMont, S. P., Jr., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Dupuis, Bro. G., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
EDMISTON, F. W., (C4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Edwards, R. E., (SI) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Egan, J. J., (C2) 

Oak Park, 111. 
Egan, R. W., (C3) 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Eidman, A. G., Jr., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ellis, A. C, (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ellis, T. H., Jr. 

Whistler, Ala. 
Ellzey, S., (A2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ernst, J. L., (SI) 

Pine Bluff, Ark. 
Escalante, W. C, (S2) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Evans, B. E., (N2) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Evans, B. D., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Evans, Bro. C, (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Evans, H. L., (C4) 

Vicksburg, Miss. 
Evans, R. A., (Nl) 

Vicksburg, Miss. 
FAGERSTROM, W., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Faget, Bro. B., (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Fagot, H. J., S.J., (N4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Farrell, G. B., Jr., (Nl) 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 



Faucher, Bro. M., (A3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Favre, W. R., Jr., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Fedor, R. E., (N2) 

Dearfield Beach, Fla. 
Feil, P. J., (C4) 
Chicago, 111. 
Fenley, C. E., (C2) 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Ficcio, V. P., (N4) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Findley, A., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Finch, W. F., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Fisher, J. N., (S2) 

Pelham Manor, N. Y. 
Fogelsanger, W. J., S.J., (N5) 

Hamburg, N. Y. 
Fly, Gale S., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Fontaine, Bro. F. X., (S3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Frederick, J. A., (S3) 

West Allis, Wise. 
Friedman, L. J., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Friedrichs, C. C, (Nl) 

Slidell, La. 
Friscia, P. F., (Nl) 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
GALLAGHER, W. B., Jr., 
(N4) 
Ocala, Fla. 
Gandara, R., (Nl) 

Rio PPiedras, P. R. 
Garbin, F., (N4) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Garcia, A. R., (C3) 
Guayama, P. R. 
Garnett, J. F., (N3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Garraway, E., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Garraway, J. A., (S3) 

Irvington, Ala. 
Garrison, Bro. O., (Nl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Gaudin, Bro. R., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Genest, S. A., (N2) 

Miami Shores, Fla. 
Geoghegan, M., (A4) 

Bardstown, Ky. 
George, W. C, (SI) 

Highland Park, Mich. 
Gibbons, H. W., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Gibson, D. E., (Nl) 
Chickasaw, Ala. 



Gier, R. E., (C3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Giglio, J. F., Ill (S) 

Shreveport, La. 
Gilbert, Bro. E., (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Gilbert, J. R., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Gilbert, T., (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Girod, M., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Glass, G. W., (SI) 

Whistler, Ala. 
Glass, T. A., (SI) 

Whistler, Ala. 
Godwin, A., (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Gonzalez, R., (Nl) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Gorham, V. R., (Nl) 

Lake Worth, Fla. 
Goudreaux, Bro. E., (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Gouin, J. L., (Al) 

Montreal, Canada 
Green, R. B., Jr., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Griffin, J. E., (CI) 

Theodore, Ala. 
Guittierrez, Al., Jr., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
HALLETT, G. L., S.J., (A3) 

Fairhope, Ala. 
Halpin, G. A., (C4) 

E. St. Louis, 111. 
Halpin, M. J., (CI) 

E. St. Louis, 111. 
Hamel, Earl, (N4) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Hannigan, H. B., (S3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Hardy, D., (C3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Hartsook, R. M., (SI) 

Demopolis, Ala. 
Hastings, F., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hawie, D. F., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hawie, W. F., Jr., (C4) 

Fairhope, Ala. 
Heggeman, B. J., Jr., (SI) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Helt, S. L., (CI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Heneghan, Bro. B., (Nl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Herlong, T. L., S.J., (N4) 

Lake Charles, La. 
Herold, V. R., (S3) 

Paterson, N. J. 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Eighty-three 



Hickey, J. L., (N4) 

Chicago, 111. 
Hickey, T. A., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hickey, T. J., Jr., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Higgins, J. E., (Al) 

Hopkinsville, Ky. 
Hill, J. F., Jr., (SI) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Hinton, G. L., Jr., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hoar, L. J., Jr., (A2) 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Hodges, C. R., (Nl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Hoffman, J. J., (S2) 

Paducah, Ky. 
Holcomb, B. T., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Holland, P. B., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Honodel, R. J., (C3) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Honovich, J., Jr., (N4) 

Shreveport, La. 
Hood, R. R., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Howell, E. N., S.J., (N4) 

Sayville, N. Y. 
Hubbard, J., (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hudson, H., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hughes, G. T., (Al) 

Chicago, 111. 
INKEL, M. J., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
JACKSON, D. S, (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Jackson, R. E., Jr., (C3) 

Somerville, N. J. 
Jacque, A. G., (A4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Jennings, P. W., (SI) 

Thiensville, Wise. 
Jernigan, H. P., Jr., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Jernigan, C. E., (SI) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Jessie, R. M., (C4) 

Faust, N. Y. 
Johnson, C. M., Jr., (C4) 

Charleston, S. C. 
Johnson, E., S.J., (A4) 

Shreveport, La. 
Johnson, J. R., (A2) 

Montgomery, Ala. 
Johnson, Marion M., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Johnson, M. J., Jr., (Nl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 



Johnson, M. J., (CI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Johnston, E. R. (S4) 

Tiffin, Ohio 
Jones, V. A., (SI) 

Natchez, Miss. 
Jongebloed, N., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Jordan, R., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Journey, C. D., Jr., (Nl) 

Selma, Ala. 
Jumonville, R. J., (Nl) 

Napoleonville, La. 
Junkin, W. J., S.J., (A4) 

Natchez, Miss. 
KAGER, J. A., (S4) 

Chicago, 111. 
Kahler, H. V., (C4) 

Quincey, Mass. 
Kain, J. S., (N2) 

Sarasota, Fla. 
Kane, R. A., (C2) 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Karcher, T. J., Jr., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Kearns, C. D., (CI) 

Louisville, Ky. 
Keene, F. H., (C4) 

Bardstown, Ky. 
Kelly, E. J., Jr., (Nl) 

Lake Worth, Fla. 
Kelly, T. M., S.J:, (A5) 

Mattapan, Mass. 
Kelton, F. H., (C2) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Kiernan, T. J., (Nl) 

Belle Harbor, L.I., N. Y. 
Kilborn, B., (A3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Killorin, E. W., (S3) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Kirkland, R., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Kirwan, J. R., Jr., (C2) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Kittler, F. J., (Nl) 

Shreveport, La . 
Klein, R. F., (N4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Klepac, J., (CI) 

Jackson, Ala. 
Knight, J. M., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Koch, C, S.J., (N4) 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Koch, P., S.J., (A5) 

Dallas, Texas 
Konzen, B. J., (N2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Kovanc, S. C, Jr., (SI) 

W. Palm Beach, Fla. 



Kruse, R. L., (CI 

Mobile, Ala. 
Kuebel, C, (Nl) 

New Orleans, La. 
LaCOLLA, E. M., (S3) 

Jamaica, L. I., N. Y. 
Ladnier, J. K., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lafitteau, W. M. (Nl) 

Metairie, La. 
Lane, M. M., (Nl) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Langan, J. N., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Langermann, L. C, (N2) 

Toledo, Ohio 
Laperle, Bro. P., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Larroque, Bro. L., (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
LaSalle, A. W., (S4) 

New Iberia, La. 
Layden, A. J., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
LeBlanc, D. W., (C4) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
LeBlanc, J. M., (S2) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Lee, T. P., (A3) 

Miami, Fla. 
Leighton, P. H., Jr., (Nl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Leon, F., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lepre, Bro. J., (CI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Leurck, E. D., (C2) 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Linares, C, (CI) 

Havana, Cuba 
Linares, F., (C2) 

Havana, Cuba 
Littlefield, D., (A4) 

Faust, N. Y. 
Lockett, J. A., S.J., (N4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Loftus, J. R., (CI) 

Princeton, Ky. 
Logan, T. W., (S2) 

San Antonio, Texas 
Logan, W., (A4) 

Pass Christian, Miss. 
Long, B. J., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lopez, R. P., (CI) 

Havana, Cuba 
Lousteau, G. J., (C2) 

Norco, La. 
Loyed, W. M., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lowe, F. C, (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Page Eighty-four 



Spring Hill College 



Lowrey, J. L., (Si) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lowrey, R. M., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lubel, M., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lydon, Bro. A., (Al) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Lynam, F. L., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lynch, Bro. J., (C2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Lyons, J. F., (Nl) 

Detroit, Mich. 
MacDONALD, R. J., (CI) 

Washington, D. C. 
MacMurtie, J. A., S.J., (A4) 

Overbrook Hills, Pa. 
McAdam, E. H., (Nl) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
McAdams, O. R., (Nl) 

Wilmer, Ala. 
McAleer, R. N., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McAleer, W. V., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McCabe, P. P., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McCabe, J. E., (SI) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
McCarthy, D., (C2) 

Glen Head, N. Y. 
McCloskey, Bro. D., (S3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
McCormick, H. T., (S4) 

Newark, N. J. 
McCormick, W.N,'., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McCown, P. (,A2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McCourt, C. L., (C3) 

Pine Bluff, Ark. 
McCue, Bro. D., (CI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
McDermott, J., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McDermott, W. H., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McDonald, T. F., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
McGinn, G. P., (CI) 

Savannah, Ga. 
McGinn, L. C, (C4) 

Montgomery, Ala. 
McGowan, R. W., S.J., (A3) 

Dallas, Texas 
McGrannahan, J. M., (S3) 

Shreveport, La. 
McGuinness, Bro. B., (Al) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Mclnerney, W. J., (N4) 

Lowell, Mass. 



McKean, L., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McLaughlin, A., (C2) 

Paterson, N. J. 
McMorrow, Bro. X., (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
McQuillen, C. J., Jr., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McWilliams, W. R., (CI) 

Monroe, La. 
Madden, T. J., S.J., (A5) 

New Orleans, La. 
Magee, N. F., (A4) 

Lancaster, Pa. 
Mahfouz, H., (SI) 

Alexandria, La. 
Malloy, W. J., Jr., (A4) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Maloney, F. J., (S3) 

Larchmont N. Y. 
Mansur, A. E., (Cl) 

Aruba, N. W. I. 
Mansur, R. D., (Cl) 

Aruba, N. W. I. 
Markham, J. E., Jr., (C4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Markwalter, J. S., (Cl) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Marone, B., (A2) 

Rochester, N. Y. 
Marquis, Bro. G., (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Martin, Bro. C, (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Mason, E. A., Jr., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Mason, M. M., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Matthews, D., (SI) 

Brooklyn N. Y. 
Mayson, W., (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Meier, T. J., (A2) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Mese, J. D., (N5) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Metzger, L., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Meyers, L. E., S.J., (A3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Michels, J. G., (A3) 

Rockaway Park, N. Y. 
Miciotto, J. C, (N2) 

Shreveport, La. 
Mills, W. W., (N2) 

Citronelle, Ala. 
Minvielle, P. J., Jr., (Nl) 

New Iberia, La. 
Moan, F. X., S.J., (A5) 

Baltimore, Md. 
Mobley, W. E., Jr., (S4) 

Macon, Ga. 



Monica, L., (S2) 

Garyville, La. 
Montero, W. M., (C2) 

Norco, La. 
Moody, J. D., Ill, (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Moore, J. C, (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Moore, M., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Moorhead, T. J., (S3) 

Wylmette, 111. 
Morel, Bro. A., (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Morris W. P., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Morrissettee, H. T., (C2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Moseley, C, (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Mould, O. W., (C2) 

N. Arlington, Va. 
Mouton, J/ A., (C2) 

Lafayette, La. 
Mueller, E. A., Jr., (Cl) 

Milwaukee, Wise. 
Mugnier, J. R., Jr., (S3) 

Birmingham, Ala. 
Mulherin, J. B., (SI) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Mulherin, L., Jr., (C2) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Mullan, R., S.J., (N4) 

Morriston, N. J. 
Murphy, J. G., (S3) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Murphy, V., (Nl) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Murray, J. W., (SI) 

Decatur, 111. 
Murray, P. D., (SI) 

Whistler, Ala. 
Murray, W. W., (N2) 

Chicago, 111. 
NAM AN, L. J., (N3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Naud, J. N., (Nl) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Naughton, T. J., (SI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Neuhoff, L. Ill, (C3) 

Roanoke, Va. 
Newlin, C. R., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Nieves, J. A., (Nl) 

Guayama, P. R. 
Nolan, D. B., (A3) 

New York, N. Y. 
Nolan, S., (N4) 

Bayou La Batre, Ala. 
Nordloh, J. H., (Al) 

Milwaukee, Wise. 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Eighty-five 



Norris, D. G., (CI) 

Adairville, Ky. 
Noto, T. A., (N2) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Nusz, J. L., (C4) 

Bowling Green, Ky. 
O'BRIEN, W. H., S.J., (N4) 

Jersey City, N. J. 
O'Connor, F. C, S.J., (N4) 

Bronx, N. Y. 
O'Donnell, F. J., (SI) 

Savannah, Ga. 
O'Grady, Bro. C, (Nl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
O'Keefe, J., (S2) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
OLeary, G. P., (S2) 

Milwaukee, Wise. 
Olivier, J. F., (A3) 

Arnaudville, La. 
Olney, J. R„ (CI) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Olney, R. B., (S4) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Ollis, J., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
O'Malley, T., (S4) 

Chicago, 111. 
O'Neal, N., S.J., (A3) 

New Orleans La. 
O'Neill, C. E., S.J., (A5) 

New Orleans, La. 
O'Neill, J. M., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
O'Shea, Bro. B., (A2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
O'Shee, W. S., Jr., (S2) 

Alexandria, La. 
Owens, R., S.J., (N4) 

Folly Beach, S. C. 
PANIELLO, A., (Nl) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Parham, J., (N3) 

Semmes, Ala. 
Park, M. T., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Parker, J. D., (Nl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Parnell, W. B., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Paton, W. D., Jr., (C3) 

Montgomery, Ala. 
Patrick, L., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Pearce, J., S.J., (A3) 

Miami, Fla. 
Pelham, J. C, (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Pelletier, Bro. C, (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Petit, J., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Phaneuf, Bro. A., A2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Phillips, A., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Phillips, E. E., (A4) 

Dallas, Texas 
Picard, A. A., Jr., (C2) 

Worcester, Mass. 
Pieper, C, (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Pocase, V., Jr., (C3) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Poe, J., (Nl) 

Hot Springs, Ark. 
Powell, C, (CI) 

Malcolm, Ala. 
Powell, W. N. 

Little Rock, Ark. 
Power, J. F., (C2) 

Norfolk, Va. 
Proulx, Bro. C, (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Prud'homme, T., (N4) 

Pineland, Texas 
Pugh, J. S., (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Purdy, J., Jr., (C3) 

Birmingham, Ala. 
RABEN, L. W., Jr. (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ramos, J., (Nl) 

San Lorenzo, R. R. 
Rasp, Bro. S., (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Reaves, L., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Redden, J. J., (N4) 

Chicago, 111. 
Rederscheid, D. J., (C3) 

Larchmont, N. Y. 
Redlingshafer, R. A., (C2) 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Reed, J. R., (Nl) 

Eunice, La. 
Reinhart, E. W., Jr., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Resha, J. J., (C2) 

Birmingham, Ala. 
Revere, J. M., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Reynolds, A. E., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Richard, L. L., Jr., (C2) 

Lafayette, La. 
Ring, P. F., Jr., (S4) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Risher, M., (CI) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Robichaux, R. T. G., (A4) 

Thibodaux, La. 
Robinson, P. M., Jr., (Nl) 

Memphis, Tenn. 



Rodriguez, A. M., (C2) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Rookis ,L. P., (N2) 

Birmingham, Ala. 
Rountree, W. F., Jr., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Roy, Bro. B., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ruff, W. F., (S2) 

Inglewood, Calif. 
Rushing, L. E., Jr., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Rushing, L. V., (N2) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Russell, L. W., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ryan, G. W., Ill, (C3) 

Forest Hills, N. Y. 
Ryan, J. P., (S3) 

Savannah, Ga. 
SALMON, M. J., (A3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sanchez, J. E., S.J., (A3) 

Mexico, D. F. 
Sanders, W. G., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sanford, R. A., (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Sapp, E. J., (A3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Saxer, R. J., (N2) 

Hasbrouch Hghts., N. J 
Schafer, J. R., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Schiro, N. T., S.J., (A5) 

New Orleans, La. 
Schluter, J. L., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Schmidt, J., (S4) 

Naperville 111. 
Schmitt, W. J., S.J., (N5) 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Schuler, M. T., S.J., (N3) 

Hamilton, Ohio 
Schutzman, R. S., (C4) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Schweitzer, R. J., (SI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Schwing, P., (S4) 

New Iberia, La. 
Scott, M. T., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Scotto, A. P., (N3) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Sedlin, L. H., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Severiano, L. P., (Nl) 

Fortaleza, Brazil 
Shackelford, T. B., (N3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Sheffield, E. J., (A3) 

Savannah, Ga. 



Page Eighty-six 



Spring Hill College 



Sheldon, J. S. T., (A2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Shields, J. A., (Nl) 

Valley Stream, N. Y. 
Shirvell, Bro. R., (Nl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Shoulders, J., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Shurtleff, D. H., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sibille, V. H., Jr., (Nl) 

Iowa, La. 
Siener, G. H., (A3) 

Spartanburg, S. C. 
Sims, P., J., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sindik, M. A., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sisson, R., (SI) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Skipper, K. J., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Skivo, A. M., (S3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Slaton, H. C, (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Smith, R. I., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Snyder, A. F„ (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sonnhalter, E. J., (C2) 

Cleveland Hghts., Ohio 
Soto, P. J., Jr., (N3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Soule, P. T., (S2) 

Portsmouth, Va. 
Stadther, H. J., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Stafford, E. B., Jr., (C2) 

Madison, N. J. 
St. Amand, Bro. C, (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Stavrakos, H. J., (N3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Steinbach, T., (N3) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Stewart, D., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Stiegler, H., S.J., (A5) 

New Orleans, La. 
Story, R., (SI) 

Milwaukee, Wise. 
Strickland, D., (S3) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Slubbers, J. C, (S4) 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Suhrer, S. W., (S5) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Surratt, J. H., (A2) 

Greenville, Ga. 
Swan, J. L., (N3) 

Mobile, Ala. 

Bulletin of Information 



Sweeney, J., S.., (A5) 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
TAIT, J. E., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Tardy, T. R., (CI) 

West Helena, Ark. 
Taylor, W. H., Jr., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Tebo, B. E., (A3) 

Miami, Fla. 
Tellier, Bro. A., (A3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Terrell, C. P., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Testin, H. S., Jr., (C2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Tharrett, P. V., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Thierry, P. A., (Nl) 

Sarasota, Fla. 
Thoman, C. J., S.J., (N3) 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Thomas, R., S.J., (A4) 

Seffner, Fla. 
Thompson, P. R., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Tiernan E. J., (S4) 

Jersey City, N. J. 
Toler, B. G., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Tonsmeire, L. E., (Al) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Toups, Bro. D., (N2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Trahan, Bro. L. B., (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
UCHELLO, L. C, JR., (Nl) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Underhill, W. E., S.J., (N3) 

Dallas, Texas 
VASSAR, F. G., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Velasquez, M. J., (C4) 

Ciudad Trujillo, D. R. 
Vessels, J. L., S.J., (A5) 

McAllen, Texas 
Vail, W. L., (N2) 

Dallas, Texas 
Voelker Bro. A., (A2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
WADDELL, G. P., (CI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Wade, W. E., (CI) 

Germantown, Tenn. 
Wagner, J., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Walker, E. L., Jr., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Walsh, J. G., (S4) 

Newark, N. J. 
Walsh, J. H., (SI) 

Sarasota, Fla. 



Walter, F. X., Ill, (Al) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Walters, C. W., (Al) 

Memphis, Tenn. 
Wanucha, S. W., Jr., (C3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Warren, D. F., (N3) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Warren, G. E., (S3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Waters, P. L., (N2) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Watts, W. E., Jr., (CI) 

Brookhaven, Miss. 
Weathers, H., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Weber, J. M., (Nl) 

Yazoo City, Miss. 
Wessely, E. E., (S4) 

Gadsden, Ala. 
Whatley, J. P., (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
White, W. W., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
White-Spunner, S. E., Jr., 

(C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Whittington, L. E., Jr., (C4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Whittington, R. G., (Al) 

Houston, Texas 
Willemse, C. W., Ill, (CI) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Williams, C. C, Jr., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Williams, L. M., (CI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Williams, R. E., Ill, (C4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Wilson, C. W., S.J., (N3) 

Miami, Fla. 
Wilson, D. M., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Wilson, H., (S3) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Wolfe, H. E., (Nl) 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
Wood, D. H., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Woods, R. E., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Woolsey, J. E., Jr. (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Wright, E. O., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
YARBROUGH, R. L., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Yelverton, C. L., (C4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Yon, Keitte S., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
ZALOPANY, P. E., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 

Page Eighty-seven 



EVENING DIVISION 



Abrams, William F. 
Arline, Leonora M. 
Arnold, Mrs. Mordecai R. 
Austin, Albert Durward 
Averyt, Joseph Henry, Jr. 
Banks, Betty Lou 
Barnes, John J. 
Barnes, Shirley L. 
Beary, Bro. Dean 
Beauchamp Sr. Benigna 
Bello, Lawrence P. 
Betbeze, Joseph Gaines 
Biggs, Mabel D. 
Black, Marcus P. 
Boazman, Myrtle Harris 
Bodden, Charles Edward 
Bonnette, Bro. Hubert 
Bridgewater, Georgine Piper 
Bruce, Norma Belle 
Brueggemann, Albert Joseph 
Burden, James P. 
Burtu, Jeanne 
Calder, Betty Lou 
Callahan, Leila Comstock 
Carney, John K. 
Carr, Sr. Catherine 
Casey, Joseph George, Jr. 
Cazalas, Marion B. 
Clague, Pearl May 
Clarke, Arthur Pierce 
Click, Roy, Jr. 
Cochran, William Robert 
Coleman, Anna L. 
Convy, Margaret D. 
Crane, Raymond Floyd 
Cyzmoure, Robert Norman 
Davis, Fred R. 
Deakle, Modeste E. 
Debrow, Arnold Dixon 
Demetropolis, Wilma K. 
Demouy, Martin 
Dick, Herman George 
Dolan, George A. 
Dretzka, Sadie Nelson 
Dugan, Margaret Helen 
Dyer, Franklin Helen 
Dyer, Franklin Q. 
Dykes, Joyce A. 
Earp, Genevieve Walsh 
Egan, William Francis 
Ernest, Sidney W., Jr. 
Everett, Lois H. 
Falls, Irving E. 



Felis, Mary Ellen 
Fishburne, Frank A. 
Ford, Mrs. Cecil B. 
Foster, William Glenn 
Fowler, Harry Victor 
Fussell, Anne F. 
Gabelly, Bro. Thaddeus 
Gallagher, Mary Sue 
Gibbons, Howell Eugene 
Girby, Helen Carolyn 
Goff, Mary Margaret 
Goubil, Harold Gregory 
Grace, James J. 
Griffin, Don Howard 
Griggs, Mary Elizabeth 
Gurganus, Annie B. 
Haas, Virginia L. 
Hamilton, Milton Kenneth 
Harding, Charles Irvin 
Hartman, Robert John 
Helms, Myrtya Matthews 
Hennington, Grace 
Hietter, Val 
Hobbs, Ema Dell 
Holden, Vera D. 
Hybart, Evelyn Dershimer 
Inge, Francis Marion, Jr. 
Jeffrey, Maud Buck 
Johnston, Lillian Stockman 
Jones, William Edward 
Kaley, George W. 
Keller, Jean 

Kelley, William Robert 
Kent, Jewel 
Klein, Mary Josephine 
Kotis, Cynthia 
Lambert, Harrie Cane 
Laubenthal, Charles J., Jr. 
Lawrence, Joseph E., Jr. 
Lawson, Carl A. 
Layton, Madeline Mary 
Lee, Rufus B. 
Little, Mazie R. 
Logan, Annie Mae 
Long, Quinton, Jr. 
Loyed, William Robert 
McCann, Thomas Lee 
McCarron, Agnes Louise 
McCorquodale, Lewis C. 
McCoy, James M. 
McCreary, Eunice 
McGrath, Catherine M. 
McHugh, Euphamia A. 



McLain, Ellis Howard 
McNamara, Rose Patricia 
McPartland, Sr. Eugenia 
Manifold, Joseph P. 
Marlow, Edmond O., Jr. 
Marney, Robert A. 
Martin, Marvell Idella 
Midgette, J. N., Jr. 
Miget, Sr. Augustine 
Militano, Simon P. 
Miller, Melgwin 
Moe, Lois W. 
Mullin, Fr. Raymond J. 
Mullins, Gertiwyl M. 
Murphy, Naomi Elizabeth 
Nagel, Marvin K. 
Neese, Ernestine 
Nelson, James C. 
Nettles, Delia 
Nolley, Royal R. 
O'Connor, John A. 
O'Connor, John D. 
Oldani, Sr. Josephine 
Oldemoppen, Bernadette G. 
Orr, Lyndon McCreary 
O'Rourke, Owen S., Jr. 
Overbey, Edward A., Sr. 
Papadeas, Andrew P. 
Parslow, Rose Mary 
Pfister, Harriet Susan 
Pickens, Madge P. 
Pierce, George Hampton 
Pierce, Ruby Morrison 
Poffenberger, Arthur 
Portella, Joseph E. 
Posey, Edna J. 
Potter, Jessie M. 
Powell, Gracie Fields 
Prince, Sam 
Rhem, Charles L., Jr. 
Reimer, Henry E., Jr. 
Reinhart, Margaret 
Repp, Florence C. 
Rice, James E. 
Roberts, Mabel C. 
Rolls, Eloise M. 
Rooney, Florence Mary 
Rouda, Samuel B. 
Sapp, Elise Conley 
Schulte, Josephine 
Scruggs, Anne Louise 
Spear, Frank 
Spence, David L. 



Page Eighty-eight 



Spring Hill College 



Taylor, Douglas K. 
Thorworth, William James 
Touart, Mabel 
Tracy, Paul C. 
Turnbull, Alice W. 
Unger, Elmer R. 
Vance, Joseph Robert 
Vandenberg, Sr. Gertrude 
Van Zandt, Sr. Cecilia 



Allen, Willodean 
Alvey, Mary Ann 
Ballard Edith Marie 
Beckham, Dorothy A. 
Benton, Mary A. 
Black, Plato A. 
Blair, Mary L. 
Bowden, Billie J. 
Brinkman, Barbara M. 
Brown, Ella J. 
Bufkin, James C. 
Burns, Ada J. 
Busby, Billie J. 
Byrd, Ada B. 
Calametti, Mary F. 
Christian, Ann J. 
Coate, Audrey O. 
Coley, Tommis J. 
Connick, Jessie A. 
Cox, Dolores L. 
Davis, Mary L. 
Davis, N. Faye 
Denney, Marie A. 
Dixon, Sue 

Engwall, Christine A. 
Fogelberg, Anna M. 
Fore, Audrey J. 
Flowers, Kathryn M. 
Fincher, Mary C. 
Fussell, Peggy C. 
Glisson, Jacqueline 
Grennlee, Annie L. 
Hamilton, Elizabeth A. 



Vickery, Minnie Elizabeth 
Wallace, Johnny C, Jr. 
Walsh, Fenwick Aloysius 
Watkins, Miles H. 
Weinacker, Cecile 
Weiss, Herman Charles 
Wiegand, Harold George 
Wiegand, Lucille D. 
Williams, David B. 

PART TIME STUDENTS 

Hannon, Catherine M. 
Harrelson, Wilma J. 
Harrison, Magdalene W. 
Harwell, Bernadette R. 
Hastings, Bonnie J. 
Hatchett, Olive Y. 
Henderson, Walter N. 
Hudson, Barbara A. 
Jackson, Maida M. 
Johnson, Brenda O. 
Johnson, Nora M. 
Joseph, William F. 
Kelly, Sidney R. 
Krarer, Nellie C. 
Krebs, Cora N. 
Langan, Carmelite M. 
Leek, Annabell B. 
LeGross, Dolores T. 
Leiser, John A. 
Lipscomb, Margaret J. 
Little, Bettye 
Loper, Gloria M. 
Lopez, Marjorie J. 
McClure, Tommy 
McCluskey, Margaret J. 
McDonald, Theda 
McQueen, Juanita E. 
Malone, Dolores M. 
Marler, June J. 
Marler, Nanine F. 
Marse, Betty J. 
Mears, George E. 
Middleton, Claudie D. 



Williams, Elizabeth S. 
Williams, John Edward 
Williamson, Vernice E. 
Wilson, William Marlon 
Winter, Jean Edwina 
Yates, Clyde W. 
Yeager, Faye Lorraine 
Zoghby, Mitchell Peter 



Montgomery, June L. 
Moore, Honor E. 
Newberry, Amelia R. 
Norrell, Susie M. 
Palmer, Minnie L. 
Patterson, Myrtie F. 
Phillips, Mildred 
Poiroux, Jane C. 
Respess, Edith M. 
Richard, Bro. Louis-Joseph 
Rodriguez, Beatrice M. 
Rogers, Barbara A. 
Rotch, Elouise 
Rowe, Gale W. 
Rushing, Lela L. 
Sharretts, Georgette L. 
Shelley, Anne F. 
Spence, L. D. 
Stanley, Ruby Nell 
Stewart, Edna E. 
Stone, Audrey F. 
Strickland, Ramona B. 
Stringer, Betty J. 
Sutton, Joy D. 
Taylor, Mary M. 
Taylor, Muriel E. 
Thomas, Marguerite Z. 
Violette, Barbara M. 
Witworth, Bessie 
Williamson, Pearl N. 
Wilson, Jennie L. 
Woodward Minnie E. 
Ware, Sr. Ann P. 



Summer Session (1950) 



Albright, Raymond G., S.J. 
Allen, Dorothy G. 
Alonzo, Reynolds T., Jr. 
Anderson, Cecil 
Andrews, John 
Arctander, Olive N. 
Avellino, Marshall 
Baggett, Joseph 
Barker, Bro. Lee 
Beary, Bro. Dean 
Beining, Paul R., S.J. 
Berry, Bro. Donnan 
Berte, John B., S.J. 
Berte, Joseph J. 



Besse, Philip A. 
Bingham, John K., S.J. 
Boggan, Sr. M. Ursula 
Bonin, Joseph M. 
Bonnette, Bro. Hubert 
Boudreaux, Claude, S.J. 
Bower, Walter T. 
Bowers, Bro. Miguel 
Brady, David 
Brady, Edward J., S.J. 
Braquet, Antoine J., S.J. 
Breazeale, Mrs. Sarah 
Brennan, Walter G., S.J. 
Brisolara, Bro. Ashton 



Bronson, Milton 
Brou, Bro. Glenn 
Brown, John R., Jr. 
Browning, James P. 
Browning, Joseph E., S.J. 
Buckley, Bro. Albert 
Bufkin, James C. 
Burt, Jean A. 
Butler, Mrs. Clerah C. 
Byrd, James C. 
Campbell, Patrick F. X. 
Carey, Patricia 
Carnes, Nancy 
Carroll Charles R. 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Eighty-nine 



Carubba, Bro. Martial 
Carter, James C, S.J. 
Cassidy, L. D. 
Castlen, Mrs. Cora 
Cazenavette, J. J., S.J. 
Challen, Mrs. R. W. 
Champagne, Bro. Norman 
Chavez, John O., S.J. 
Chinery, Bro. Faber 
Clarke, William A. 
Clawson, Robert C. 
Clifton, Naomi 
Cloney, Robert D., S.J. 
Cloonan, Bro. Stephen 
Cohen, Harold, S.J. 
Coldfinger, Mrs. Lorene C. 
Coleman, Franklin 
Coles, Edward T., S.J. 
Collier, Mrs. Irma L. 
Conmay, Thomas P. 
Convy, Margaret D. 
Cook, Mrs. Alice C. 
Cousins, Ewert, S.J. 
Cox, James E. 
Cox, Bro. Joges 
Cox, Zoe Belle 
Coxwell, Merrida P. 
Crabtree, Sr. M. Johanna 
Creagan, Daniel A., S.J. 
Crespo, J. Raul 
Cuevas, Juan O. 
Culivan, Jeanne M. 
Cummins, John F. 
DAmato, Nicholas A. 
Damrich, Monica 
Daugherty, H. G. 
Davis, Fred R. 
DeBarros, Julius F. 
Deeves, John F., S.J. 
Delaney, Sr. Maura 
DeNeefe, Richard F. 
DeMouy, Martin 
DeRussy, Edward, S.J. 
Denton, Leo 
DeVan, Carolyn G. 
Devine, John F., S.J. 
Diez, Charles, Jr. 
Donaghey, Bro. Borgia 
Donivan, Sr. Mary Aloysia 
d'Ornellas, Marguerite 
d'Ornellas, Virginia 
Downey, James C. 
Doyle, Bro. Walter 
Drago, Arthur C. 
Dretzka, Sadie N. 
Driscoll, Mrs. Bertie S. 
Duffey, Bro. Clarence 
Duffy, James J., Jr. 
Durick, Sr. M. Margarei 
Edmiston, Fred W. 
Ellis, Mrs. Lucy R. 
Edwards, John 



Ellis, Troy H., Jr. 
England, John 
Ernest, Billie A. 
Ernest, Sidney W., Jr. 
Evans, Bro. Carl 
Evans, Harry L. 
Faget, Bro. Bosco 
Fagot, H. J., S.J. 
Favre, Wm., R., Jr. 
Faulk, Mrs. Meade B. 
Ficcio, Valentino P. 
Finch, Warren 
Florez, Albert R. 
Fogelsanger, Walter J., S.J. 
Fox, Robert A. 
Freeman, Warren E., S.J. 
Gabelly, Bro. Thaddeus 
Garrawy, Erin H. 
Gavin, Bro. Francis 
Geil, Arthur E. 
Gibbons, Howell E. 
Gibbons, Bro. Terence 
Gibson, Donald E. 
Giglio, Joseph F., Ill 
Gilbert, Bro. Emile 
Girold, Morton, K. 
Godwin, Arnold W. 
Gorday, Wm. B. 
Graham, Florence A. 
Grandy, Lucile 
Gray, Frank E., Jr. 
Griffin, James E. 
Grottendick, Sr. M. Philip 
Guillot, Max A., Jr. 
Guthans, Robert 
Hall, William M. 
Hallett, Garth L., S.J. 
Hammond, Gene A. 
Hankins, Katherine H. 
Harwell, Converse 
Hawie, Donald 
Hawie, W. F., Jr. 
Hays, Ann T. 
Hays, Laura 
Heath, Ruth C. 
Hebert, Bro. Cecil 
Henderson, Sr. M. Gregory 
Herlong, T. L., S.J. 
Hilbert, Duval J., S.J. 
Hoffman, Joe 
Holloway, Alvin, S.J. 
Hough, Mrs. Mamie I. 
Howell, Edgar N., S.J. 
Holmes, Bro. Malachy 
Honodel, Richard J. 
Hulcher, Ralph 
Hybart, Mrs. Evelyn 
Jackson, Bro. Alberic 
Jackson, Pellerree 
Jarreau Neil J., S.J. 
Jasany, Robert J. 
Jenniskens, Thomas J., S.J. 



Johnson, Earl, S.J. 
Jones, Shirley 
Jordan, Ralph G. 
Jung, Bro. Arthur 
Junkin, W. J., S.J. 
Kager, John A. 
Kayusa, Robert 
Kearney, Sr. M. Immaculata 
Kelly, Thomas M., S.J., 
Kenny, Bro. Damian 
Kidwell, William C, S.J. 
Kilborn, Ben 
Kirkpatrick, Sr. Edwina 
Koch, Charles F., S.J. 
Koch, Patrick H., S.J. 
Kospetos, Katherine 
Larroque, Bro. Lucian 
Lauten, Ray C, Jr. 
Leatherbury, Mrs. Jamie 
Leatherwood, Emma E. 
LeBlanc, Clarence J., Jr. 
LeBlanc, John M. 
LeBlanc, Bro. Rene 
Ledet, Bro. Sidney 
Lilly, Robert F. 
Lindsey, Beverly 
Lockett, James A., S.J. 
Lorio, Bro. Farrel 
Lorio, Lloyd A., S.J. 
Lousteau, Gordon J. 
Lynch, Bro. Jude 
Lynch, Thomas J. 
Lyons, Peter H. 
McClure, Tommy 
McCown, Robert M. 
McGowan, R. W., S.J. 
McLinskey, Bro. Mel 
McMorrow, Bro. Xavier 
McNeill, Ola 
McQuillen, Claude J. 
MacMurtie, J. Alex., S.J. 
Madden, Thomas J., S.J. 
Mallon, Mrs. Irma C. 
Mareno, Mrs. Edna L. 
Markham, John E., Jr. 
Marroquin, Carlos W. 
Martin, Frances F. 
Martin, James 
Mason, Milton M. 
Maury, Alice M. 
Mendelsohn, Bro. Sherwin 
Messonier, Bro. Rian 
Meyers, Louis E. S.J. 
Miklic, John A. 
Miller, Charles L. 
Mills, Warren 
Monica, Louis R. 
Moccia, Bro. Regis 
Montero, Wilson M. 
Mooney, Bro. Hilbert 
Moore, Milton, W., Jr. 
Morris Ella D. 



Page Ninety 



Spring Hill College 



Morris, William F. 
Mullan, R. F., S.J. 
Mullins, William I. 
Murphy, George A., S.J. 
Myer, Mrs. Ethel B. 
Nass, Dorothy 
Nee, Walter J., S.J. 
Nobles, Noel 
Nolan, Daniel B. 
Noto, Thomas A. 
O'Brien, Charles L. 
O'Brien, William H. S.J. 
O'Connor, Francis O, S.J. 
Olney, Robert 
O'Neill, Charles E., S.J. 
O'Neill, John M., Jr. 
O'Neill, Bro. Clifford 
O'Shea, Bro. Brendan 
O'Shee, William S., Jr. 
Owens, Robert, S.J. 
Palmiter, Madelyn 
Parr, Bro. Joachim 
Parker, Jack D. 
Peabody, Bro. Evan 
Pearce, J. Donald, S.J. 
Pelham, John C. 
Pocase, Vincent J., Jr. 
Poirier, Dave P. 
Przytulski, Bro. Sigmund 
Pugh, Jesse S. 
Rasp, Bro. Sylvester 
Richard, Bro. Ray 
Reinhart, Marguerite W. 
Repp, Florence C. 
Reynolds, Bro. Neil 
Richard, Bro. Louis J. 
Riley, Sr. M. Hortense 
Rimes, Robert, S.J. 
Roberts, Corinne 
Roberts, Mabel C. 
Robinson, Theodore F. 
Rodrigue, Bro. Gaspar 



Rogge, Norman J., S.J. 
Roussell, Bro. James 
Rowley, Joseph C. 
Ruiz, Mario 
Russell, Lloyd W. 
Rutherford, Frances W. 
Sanchez, Jose E., S.J. 
Sanders, Wilber G. 
SanMarco, Salvator, J., S.J. 
Savoie, Donald J. 
Scarabin, Sr. M. Doloretta 
Schambeau, Tarleton A., Jr. 
Schiro, Nicholas, S.J. 
Schmidt, John A. 
Schmitt, William J., S.J. 
Schuler, Mark T., S.J. 
Scott, Marvin 
Sells, Lily T. 
Shackleford Thomas B. 
Shirvell, Bro. Raymond 
Shofner, Vivian 
Singler, James L. 
Skidmore, James R. 
Slaton, H. C. 
Slavick, Kenneth L. 
Stavrakos, Harry J. 
Stephens, Ralph D. 
Stiogler, Hilliard, S.J. 
Strickland, David O. 
Suhrer, Samuel W. 
Sumerlin, Clara M. 
Sweeney, Joseph F., S.J. 
Tew, John T. 
Tew, June T. 
Thoman, Charles J., S.J. 
Thomas J. Cleve 
Thompson Paul R. 
Thomas, Richard M., S.J. 
Thresh, John A. 
Thul, Blanche 
Thul, James R. 
Tiblier, Edgar J., S.J. 
Tiernan, Emmett 



Toland, J. Fred 
Tonne Robert A. 
Toups, Bro. David 
Tuero, Manuel, Jr. 
Turner, Nancy 
Underhill, William E., S.J. 
Usina, Patrick, S.J. 
Urquhart, Madge 
Vaughan Bernice P. 
Velazquez, Maximo E. 
Vessels, John L., S.J. 
Villaverde, Antonio E., S.J. 
Vines, Louis S. 
Voelker, Bro. Alton 
Vogtner, Francis Q. 
Walker, Elijah L., Jr. 
Walle, Julius G., S.J. 
Walsh, James G. 
Walsh, Sr. M. Mark 
Walsh Wm. H., S.J. 
Waters, Perry L. 
Weathers, Henry T. 
Weber, Edward 
Welsh, John R., S.J. 
Wenzel, Bro. Cyran 
Whigham, Elizabeth 
White, Charles F. 
Whittington, Lawrence, Jr. 
Willard, E. Ebbie 
Williams, David B. 
Williams, Robert E., Ill 
Williams, John E. 
Wilson, Crown, S.J. 
Wilson, John Patrick 
Wilson, Emery M. 
Wilson, Joseph H., Jr. 
Wilson, Douglas M. 
Wilson, Nell P. 
Wohlbruck, Bro. Kostka 
Woolsey, Jere E., Jr. 
Yelverton, Calvin L. 
Zibilich, Bro. Foster 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Ninety-one 



Summary of Enrollment 



Number of 
Students 



Regular Session — Full Time 610 

Regular Session — Part Time 99 

Evening Division 193 j 

Summer Session, 1950 356 | 

Total Gross Enrollment 1258 

Less Duplication 219 

Total Net Enrollment 1039 

Summary of Full Time Enrollment 



By Class: 

Freshmen 203 

Sophomores 155 

Juniors 1 04 

Seniors 130 

Postgraduates 18 

By Course: 



Arts 

Commerce 


76 

151 


Natural Sciences 


189 


Social Sciences 


194 



By Place of Residence: 

Alabama 

Araknsas 



.282 



California 

Connecticut 

District of Columbia! 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 



1 

49 
16 
38 
13 

58 



Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York r 

North Carolina 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Pennsylvania 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Brazil 

Canada 

Cuba 



5 

7 

15 

10 

18 

1 

28 

1 

5 

4 

12 

10 

1 

3 

Dominican Republic 1 

N. W. I. 2 

Mexico 1 

Puerto Rico 4 



Page Ninety-two 



Spring Hill College 






. 




SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SECOND 

ACADEMIC YEAR 




1952-1953 



PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE 

MOBILE • SPRING HILL STATION • ALABAMA 



CORPORATE TITLE 

Spring Hill College 

Spring Hill (Mobile Co.) 

Alabama 

ACCREDITED BY 

Alabama State Department of Education 
Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
Board of Regents of the University of the State of New Yor\ 
American Medical Association 

MEMBER OF 

Association of American Colleges 

American Council on Education 

National Catholic Education Association 

American Library Association 

National Council of Independent Schools 

Educational Records Bureau 

American Association for the Advancement of Science 

Jesuit Educational Association 

Alabama Educational Association 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Academic Calendar iv 

Administration and Faculty 1 

Trustees and Governors 3 

Administration 4 

Officers of Instruction 5 

Committees of the Faculty 11 

Credo of Spring Hill 12 

General Information and Regulations 13 

General Information 15 

Admission Requirements and Educational Objectives 19 

The Government and the Welfare of the Students 23 

Academic Regulations 27 

Programs of Curricula 30 

Fees and Expenses 40 

Scholarships and Student Aid 43 

Requirements for Graduation 45 

Prizes and Trophies 47 

Courses of Instruction and Register of Students 49 

Departments of Instruction 51 

fiiology 51 

Chemistry 53 

Classical Languages 55 

Commerce 56 

Education 61 

Engineering 62 

English 63 

History 64 

Mathematics 66 

Military Science and Tactics 67 

Modern Languages 67 

Music 69 

Philosophy 70 

Physical Education 72 

Physics 73 

Political Science 74 

Psychology 74 

Religion 75 

Sociology 76 

SprecA 77 

Decrees Conferred 78 

Register of Students 81 

iii 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR, 19524953 



Summer Session, 1952 : June 14 - July 25 

Regular Session, 1952-1953 



1952 



September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
October 


15-17 
17 
18 
25 
27 

28-31 


November 


1 


November 


6-10 


November 


26 


December 


1 


December 


8 


December 


20 


1953 




January 
January 
January 


5 

21-24 

26 


Janauary 
February 
February 
March 


27 

8 

16-17 

13-17 


April 

April 

April 

May 

May 


2-7 

8 

22 

14 

24 


May 
May 


25-29 
26 


May 


29 



FALL SEMESTER 

Registration and Orientation for Freshmen. 

Registration of upperclassmen. 

All classes begin. Late registration fine becomes applicable. 

Mass of the Holy Spirit celebrated in the College Chapel. 

Conditional examinations from the previous semester. 

Annual spiritual retreat for students. 

Feast of All Saints; no classes meet. 

Fall intrasemestral tests; no classes meet. 

Thanksgiving recess begins at noon. 

Classes resume on regular schedule. 

Feast of the Immaculate Conception; no classes meet. 

Christmas recess begins at noon. 



Classes resume on regular schedule. 

Semester examinations; registration for the spring semester. 

Registration of new students for spring semester. 

SPRING SEMESTER 

First classes of spring semester; fine for late registration. 

Conditional examinations from the preceding semester. 

Mardi Gras recess. 

Spring intrasemestral tests; no classes meet. 

Easter recess. 

Classes resume on regular schedule. 

Solemnity of St. Joseph, Patron of the College; no classes meet. 

Ascension Thursday; no classes meet. 

Baccalaureate Sunday. 

Final examinations for spring semester. 

Last examination and end of the semester. 

Commencement exercises. 






IV 



ADMINISTRATION 

AND 

FACULTY 




Uh 



m 



p s "H 



00k** 



TRUSTEES AND GOVERNORS 



TRUSTEES OF THE CORPORATION 

Very Reverend W. Patrick Donnelly, s.j.* 

Reverend Sidney A. Tonsmeire, s.j. 

Reverend John A. Cronin, s.j. 

Reverend John A. Gasson, s.j. 

Reverend Andrew C. Smith, s.j. 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

(This board, organized in 1931, is responsible for the supervision 
and administration of the endowment fund for the college.) 



Very Reverend W. Patrick Donnelly, s.j., Chariman ex-ojficio 

Reverend Joseph M. Walsh, s.j. 

H. Manning McPhillips 

David R. Dunlap 

Gordon Smith, sr. 

James C. van Antwerp, b.s. 



^Resigned as of March 25, 1952 



Bulletin of Information Page Three 



ADMINISTRATION 



OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE 

Very Reverend W. Patrick Donnelly, s.j., a.m., President* 

Reverend Andrew C. Smith, s.j., ph.d., Dean of the College 

Reverend Sidney A. Tonsmeire, s.j., Secretary^ 

Reverend John A. Cronin, s.j., a.m., Treasurer 

Reverend William J. Rimes, s.j., m.s., Dean of Men 

Louis J. Boudousquie, m.s., Registrar 

OFFICIALS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Mrs. Florence M. Bare, b.s., Dietician 

Alvin Buckhaults, Golf Instructor 

Sergeant First Class Patrick E. Burns, u.s.a., 

Light Weapons NCO, R.O.T.C. 

Norborne R. Clark, jr., a.b., m.a., m.d., Attending Physician 

Reverend Arthur Colkin, s.j., a.b., Director of Intramural Athletics 

Reverend Daniel M. Cronin, s.j., a.m., Faculty Moderator of Athletics 

Master Sergeant Robert E. DeNeefe, jr., u.s.a., Chief Cler\, R.O.T.C. 

William Gardiner, m.a., Director of Athletics and Coach 

Marie Yvonne Jaubert, a.b., m.a., b.l.s., Librarian 

Jean Keller, Assistant to the Registrar 

Mrs. Albert Levet, r.n., Director of the Infirmary 

Reverend Michel B. Majoli, s.j., m.a., Student Counsellor 

Paul A. Napolitano, b.s.c, Assistant Athletic Coach 

Sergeant First Class Rorert L. Randolph, u.s.a., Supply NCO, R.O.T.C. 
Sergeant First Class Roger L. Reid, u.s.a., Motor NCO, R.O.T.C. 

Joseph G. Tyrrell, a.b., Bursar 

Cliff Worsham, b.s., Director of Publicity 

Robert J. Zietz, b.s., m.lib., Assistant Librarian 



♦Resigned as of March 25, 1952 
tActing President as of March 25, 1952 

Page Four Spring Hill College 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 






Arnold J. Benedetto, s.j., ph.d., Assistant Professor of Philosophy and 
Chairman of the Department. 

A.B., St. Louis University, 1937; Ph.D., Gregorian University, 1948. 
Instructor in Classical Languages and History, St. Charles College, 1939-41; Assistant 
Professor of Philosophy, Spring Hill College, 1948-; Chairman, 1950-. 

Samuel M. Betty, m.a., Assistant Professor of Economics* 
M.S.C., Spring Hill, 1939; M.A., Fordham University, 1947. 
Instructor in Economics, Spring Hill College, 1946-48; Assistant Professor, 1948-. 

Louis }. Boudousquie, m.s., Registrar, Professor of Drawing. 
B.S., Spring Hill, 1917; M.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1936. 
Instructor, McGill Institute, Mobile, 1921-28; Registrar, Spring Hill, 1928-; Instructor, 
1928-36; Associate Professor, 1936-50; Professor, 1951-. 

Francis X. Carberry, m.b.a., Associate Professor of Business Administration. 
B.S., Canisius College, 1925; M.B.A., Harvard University, 1928. 

Instructor, Buffalo Collegiate Center, 1933-36; Assistant Professor, Alabama Polytechnic 
Institute, 1936-42; National War Labor Board, 1943-45; Associate Professor, Georgia 
Institute of Technology, 1946-49; Associate Professor, Spring Hill College, 1949-. 

O. L. Chason, d.p.h., Special Lecturer in Sociology. 
Health Officer, Mobile, 1934. 
B.S., University of Alabama, 1923; M.D., Tulane, 1925; D.P.H., Harvard, 1934, County 

Thomas Hanley Clancy, s.j., m.a., Instructor in Political Science. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1948; M.A., Fordham University, 1951. 
Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1950-. 

Arthur A. Colkin, s.j., a.b., Associate Professor of History. 

A.B., St. Louis University, 1935. 

Instructor in History, Spring Hill College, 1937-41; Assistant Professor of History, 

1946-51; Associate Professor, 1951-. 

Daniel M. Cronin, s.j., a.m., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 
A.B., St. Louis, 1900; A.M., 1901. 

Instructor, Spring Hill, 1901-03; Jesuit High School, New Orleans, La., 1903-06; 
Associate Professor, Chairman of Department of Mathematics, Spring Hill, 1913-35; 
Spring Hill, 1939-45; Professor, 1946-51; Professor Emeritus, 1951. 



*On leave for military service. 

Bulletin of Information Page Five 



John A. Cronin, s.j., m.a., Professor of Economics, Chairman of the 
Department. 

B.S.C., Spring Hill, 1929 M.A., St. Louis University, 1937. 

Professor of Economics, Spring Hill, 1937-38, 1943-; Chairman of the Department, 
1943-. 

Armand N. Cuen, m.a., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

B.A., Texas College of Mines, 1947; M.A., Texas Western College, 1948. 

Ft. Bliss Language Instructor, 1947; Chavez Academy, 1948; El Paso Public Schools, 

1948-50; Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1950-. 

Eugene R. Curtan, Lt. Col., U.S.A., a.b., Assistant Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics. 
A.B., Texas A & M College, 1942. 

Graduate Automotive Maintenance School; Armed Forces Information School; Trans- 
portation School (basic course) and ROTC Indoctrination Course. Assigned Spring Hill 
College, 1950. 

John Vincent Deignan, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Chemistry, Chairman of the 
Department. 

A.B., Woodstock College, 1917; A.M., 1920; Ph.D., Fordham University, 1929 
Instructor in Chemistry, Spring Hill, 1917-1922; Professor and Chairman, 1929-. 

Robert Emmett DeNeefe, jr., M/Sgt., U.S.A., b.c.s., Instructor in 
Military Science and Tactics. 
B.C.S., Notre Dame, 1931. 
Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1951-. 

Louis J. Eisele, s.j., m.s., Assistant Professor of Physics. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1935; M.S., 1940. 

Teaching Fellow, St. Louis University, 1939-40; Instructor in Physics and Mathematics, 
Spring Hill College, 1940-41; Assistant Professor of Physics, 1946-. 

Warren Eugene Freeman, s.j., a.b., Instructor in English. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1949. 
Assistant in English, 1950; Instructor, 1951-. 

Walter Laurie Furman, s.j., m.s., Instructor in Physics and Mathematics. 
B.S., The Citadel, 1933; M.S., University of Florida, 1941; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 
1951. 

Assistant in Physics, University of Florida, 1934-36; Instructor in Physics and Mahe- 
matics, Spring Hill Colege, 1943-46; Assistant in Mathematics, St. Louis University, 
1947-50; Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1951-. 

William Q Gardiner, m.a., Assistant Professor of Physical Education and 
Coach, Athletic Director. 

A.B., Georgetown University, 1943; M.A., University of Maryland, 1952. 
Athletic Instructor, Washington, D. C, Recreation Department, 1942; Athletic Instructor, 
U. S. Army, 1943-46; Athletic Instructor, and Coach, Spring Hill College, 1946. 

John A. Gasson, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Philosophy and Psychology, Chair- 
man of the Department of History and Social Sciences. 
A.B., Boston College, 1927; A.M., 1928; Ph.D., Gregorian University, Rome, 1931; 
S.T.L., Weston College, 1934. 

Instructor in History, Latin and Greek, Spring Hill, 1928-30; Professor of Philosophy 
and Psychology, Spring Hill, 1937. 



Page Six Spring Hill College 



Charles C. Goetz, s.j., s.t.l., Assistant Professor of Religion, Chairman of 
the Department. 

B.S., Spring Hill College, 1938; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1947. 
Instructor in Chemistry, Spring Hill College, 1946-47; Assistant Professor of Religion, 
1948-. 

Lester F. X. Guterl, s.j., m.a., Associate Professor of Education and Chair- 
man of the Department. 

A.B., Villanova College, 1929; M.A., St. Louis University, 1937. 

Assistant Professor, Education and Political Science, Spring Hill College, 1937-39; Dean 
of Men, Assistant Dean of Arts and Sciences, Associate Professor, Religion and Educa- 
tion, Loyola University, 1943-50; Associate Professor of Education, Spring Hill College, 
1951-. 

Kermit T. Hart, m.s., c.p.a., Special Lecturer in Accounting. 

B.S., University of Florida, 1927; M.S., University of Alabama, 1940; C.P.A. (Alabama). 
Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1928-37; Assistant Professor, 1937-41; Associate Pro- 
fessor, 1941-46; Special Lecturer, 1946-. 

John J. Holden, m.ed., Assistant Professor of History. 
B.S., Ithaca College, 1933; M.Ed., Rutgers University, 1946. 

Educational Advisor, Civilian Conservation Corps, 1934-38; Instructor Middleboro Pub- 
lic Schools, 1939-42; Ordinance Department, War Department, 1942-46; Instructor in 
History, Spring Hill, 1947-50; Assistant Professor, 1951-. 

John A. Hutchins, s.j., a.m., Professor of French. 
A.B., Woodstock College, 1911; A.M., 1912. 

Instructor, St. Boniface College, Winnipeg, Canada, 1913-16; Jesuit High School, 
1921-22; Spring Hill High School, 1924-27; Professor of French, Spring Hill College, 
1927-. 

Francis L. Janssen, s.j., m.a., Professor of Language and Philosophy, Chair- 
man of the Department of Languages. 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1921; M.A., 1922. 

Professor of Languages, Religion, Philosophy, Spring Hill, 1932-37, 1942-43; Assistant 
Dean, Loyola niversity, New Orleans, 1937-42; Principal, St. John's High, Shreveport, 
1943-47; Professor of Languages, Religion and Philosophy, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Languages, Spring ill, 1947. 

Martin V. Jarreau, s.j., b.s.e., Instructor in Economics. 
B.S.E., Loyola University, 1936. 

Instructor in Economics and Accounting, Spring Hill College, 1943-44, 195 1-; Instruc- 
tor, Jesuit High School, Tampa, 1944-46; Visiting Instructor in Philosophy, Spring Hill 
College, Summer 1950. 

Everett H. Larguier, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Mathematics and Chairman of 
the Department of Mathematics and Physics. 

A.B., St. Louis University, 1934; M.S., 1936; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1947. 
Teaching Fellow, St. Louis University, 1934-35; Professor of Mathematics and Physics, 
Spring Hill, 1937-38; Assistant, Department of Mathematics, St. Louis University, 
1939-42; Visiting Lecturer in Mathematics, Loyola University, New Orleans, Summer, 
1942; Professor of Mathematics and Chairman of the Department of Mathematics and 
Physics, Spring Hill College, 1947. 

C. Franklyn Lynette, s.j., s.t.l., Instructor in Philosophy. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1940; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1948. 
Instructor, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1941-44; Instructor in Philosophy, Loyola 
University, 1949-51; Instructor, Spring Hill College, 195 1-. 

Bulletion of Information Page Seven 



Michel B. Majoli, s.j., m.a., Instructor in Sociology and Religion, Student 
Counsellor. 

A.B., Spring Hill College, 1940; M.A., St. Louis University, 1945; S.T.L., 1948. 
Instructor, St. John's High School, Shreveport, 1941-43; Assistant Principal, 1942-43; 
Instructor, Loyola University, Summer 1942; Student Counsellor, Jesuit High School, 
New Orleans, 1949-51; Instructor in Sociology and Religion, Spring Hill College, 1951-. 

Warren J. Martin, s.j., a.m., Special Instructor in Spanish. 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1925; A.M., 1926. 

Instructor, Jesuit High School, Tampa, 1934-44; St. John's, Shreveport, 1944-45; Special 
Instructor, Spring Hill, 1945-. 

Walter Charles McCauley, s.j., a.b., Instructor in English. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1949. 
Instructor in English, Spring Hill College, 1951-. 

Joseph B. Miller, m.d., Research Associate in Biology. 
M.D., Louisiana State University Medical School, 1944. 

Residency in Pediatrics: Sea View Hospital, Staten Island, N. Y., 1948-49; Bellevue 
Hospital, New York, 1949-50; Research Associate, Spring Hill College, 195 1-. 

Elmore Patrick Moore, Lt. Col., U.S.A., m.a., Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics, and Chairman of the Department. 
Ph. B., St. Thomas Seminary, 1929; M.A., 1932. 

Graduate, The Infantry School; The Adjutant General School; Command and General 
Staff School; Assigned Spring Hill College, 1950. 

James E. Moore, ll.b., Special Lecturer in Business Law. 

A.B., Spring Hill College, 1939; LL.B., University of Alabama, 1948. 
Special Lecturer in Business Law, Sprink Hill College, 1948-. 

John Moreau, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Philosophy. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1926; A.M., 1927; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1934; 
Ph.D., Gregorian University, 1938; Mag. Agg., 1938. 
Professor of Philosophy, Spring Hill, 1938-. 

Thomas F. Mulcrone, s.j., m.s., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
B.S., Spring Hill College, 1939; M.S., Catholic University, 1942. 

Instructor in Mathematics, Spring Hill College, 1940-41; 1942-43, Assistant in Mathe- 
matics, St. Louis University, 1944-46; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Spring Hill 
College, 1948-. 

Malcolm Patrick Mullen, s.j., ph.d., Associate Professor of Philosophy. 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1928; A.M., 1929; Ph.D., Gregorian University, 1932; 
S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1936. 

Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1929-32; Jesuit High School, New Orleans, Sum- 
mers, 1930-32; Associate Professor, Loyola University, New Orleans, 1937-38; Assistant 
Professor, Spring Hill College, 1939-49; Associate Professor, 1949-. 

Raymond Jerome Mullin, s.j., a.m., Assistant Professor of Philosophy and 
Religion. 

LL.B., Brooklyn Law School (St. Lawrence University), 1911; LL.M., 1912; A.B., 
Gonzaga University, 1929; A.M., 1930; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1935. 
Instructor in Languages, Loyola University, 1920-30; Assistant Professor of Religion, 
Philosophy and Sociology, 1940-46; Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion, 
Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

Page Eight Spring Hill College 



J. Franklin Murray, s.j., a.m., Associate Professor of English and Chairman 
of the Department. 

A.B., St. Louis University, 1937; A.M., 1942; S.T.L., 1947. 

Instructor in English, Spring Hill College, 1939-40, 1941-42; Assistant Professor, 
1946-51; Associate Professor, 1951-, Department Chairman, 1952-. 

Joseph Otto Muscat, m.d., Associate Professor of Biology (part time). 
M.D., St. Louis University, 1931. 

Paul A. Napolitano, b.s.c, Instructor in Physical Education and Assistant 
Athletic Coach. 
B.S.C, Spring Hill College, 1948. 
Instructor of Physical Education and Assistant Coach, Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

John O'Keefe, s.j., a.m., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1935; A.M., 1939. 

Instructor, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1939-39, 19444-46; Instructor, Spring Hill 
College, 1946-49; Assistant Professor, 1949-. 

Robert Owens, s.j., b.s., Laboratory Assistant in Biology. 
B.S., Spring Hill College, 1951. 
Assistant in Biology, Spring Hill College, 1951-. 

Eugene T. Regal, a.m., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1933; A.M., 1934. 

Instructor in Biology, Marquette University, 1935-36; Professor of Science, St. Frincis 
Seminary, Milwaukee, 1936-39; Instructor in Biology, Milwaukee Public School System, 
1939-45; Educational Director Wisconsin Coca-Cola Co., 1945-47; Assistant Professor of 
Biology, Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

Walter Joseph Rhein, s.j., m.s., Assistant Professor of Physics* 
A.B., The Rice Institute, 1936; M.S., Fordham University, 1943. 
Instructor in Physics, Spring Hill College, 1943-45, Assistant Professor, 1950-. 

William John Rimes, s.j., m.s., Instructor in Chemistry and Dean of Men. 
B.S., Spring Hill College, 1943; M.S., Catholic University of America, 1945. 
Instructor in Chemistry, Spring Hill College, 1945-46; 1951-; Dean of Men, 1951-. 

Andrew Cannon Smith, s.j., ph.d., Dean, Professor of English. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1923; A.M., Catholic University, 1930; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago, 1934. 

Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1923-24; Assistant Professor of English, Loyola Univer- 
sity of the South, 1931-32; Dean and Professor of English, Spring Hill, 1934-; Chair- 
man of the Department, 1936-52. 

Franklyn H. Sweet, m.s., c.p.a., Professor of Accounting. 
B.S., University of Alabama, 1938; M.S., 1948; C.P.A. (Alabama). 
Assistant Professor of Accounting, University of Alabama, 1946-48; Professor of Account- 
ing, Spring Hill College, 1948. 

Brother Claver Thomas, s.c., a.m., Special Lecturer in Mathematics and 
Education. 

A.B., Rutgers University, 1930; A.M., Fordham University, 1946; Cand. Ph.D., 1951. 
Instructor, Sacred Heart Scholasticate, Daphne, 1949-550; Special Lecturtr, Spring Hill 
College, 1951. 

Bulletin of Information Page Nine 



Clem Emile Toca, b. mus. ed., Instructor in Music. 
B. Mus. Ed., Loyola University, 1950. 

Instructor in music in New Orleans' schools, 1948-49; Instructor, Marine Corps Band 
School, 1950-51; Instructor in music, Spring Hill College, 1951-. 

George O. Twellmeyer, s.j., m.s., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1931; M.S., St. Louis University, 1940. 
Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1938-39, Summer, 1944; Assistant Professor of Chem- 
istry, Loyola University of the South, 1947-49; Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Spring 
Hill College, 1950-. 

John T. Walsh, s.j., m.a., Assistant Professor of English. 
A.B., Spring Hill College, 1939; M.A., Fordham University, 1942. 
Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1941-43; Assistant Professor, 1948-. 

Scott Youree Watson, s.j., ph.d., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1937; Ph.L., Gregorian University, 1947; Ph.D., 1948. 
Instructor, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1939-41; Instructor, St. Charles College, 
Summers, 1940 and 1941; Instructor, Spring Hill College, Summer, 1945; Assistant 
Professor of Philosophy, Spring Hill College, 1948-. 

Patrick Henry Yancey, s.j., ph.d., Professor of Biology, Chairman of the 
Department. 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1918; A.M., 1919; Ph.D., St. Louis University, 1931. 
Instructor in Biology, Spring Hill, 1919-23; St. Louis University, 1930-31; Professor of 
Biology, Chairman of the Department, 193 1-; Member of the Board, National Science 
Foundation, 1950-. 



*Absent on leave. 



Page Ten Spring Hill College 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 
(1951-1952) 



Admission and Degrees: 

Mr. Boudousquie, Chairman; Frs. Deignan, Guterl, Janssen and Mr. 
Sweet. 

Curriculum: 

Chairmen of the various departments: Fr. Smith, Chairman; Fr. Benedetto, 
Fr. J. Cronin, Fr. Deignan, Fr. Gasson, Fr. Goetz, Fr. Guterl, Fr. Janssen, 
Fr. Larguier, Lt. Col. Moore, Fr. Murray, Fr. Yancey. 

Faculty Ran\ and Tenure: 

Fr. Yancey, Chairman; Frs. D. Cronin, Larguier, Tiblier, and Mr. 
Boudousquie. 

Discipline: 

Fr. Rimes, Chairman; Frs. Guterl, Smith, Tonsmeire, Walsh, and Mr. 
Clancy. 

Student Welfare: 

Fr. Majoli, Chairman; Frs. Hutchins, Lynette, O'Keefe and Mr. Owens. 

Library: 

Miss Jaubert, Chairman; Frs. Gasson, Larguier, Smith, Watson and Messrs. 
Cuen and Zietz. 

Athletics: 

Fr. D. Cronin, Chairman; Frs. Colkin, Martin, Messrs. Gardiner, Napoli- 
tano and McCauley. 

Publication: 

Fr. Larguier, Chairman; Frs. Goetz, Murray, Yancey, Messrs. McCauley, 
Worsham. 

Public Occasions: 

Fr. Eisele, Chairman; Frs. Mulcrone, Twellmeyer, Messrs. Freeman and 
Holden. 

Recommendations to Medical and Dental Schools: 

Fr. Smith, Chairman; Frs. Deignan, Furman, Rimes, Yancey and Mr. 
Regal. 

Veterans' Affairs and Military Deferments: 

Lt. Col. Moore, Chairman; Lt. Col. Curtan, Fr. Jarreau, Messrs Boudous- 
quie, Carberry and Tyrrell. 

| Bulletin of Information Page Eleven 



CREDO OF SPRING HILL 



Spring Hill College refuses to subscribe to the doctrine that "academic 
freedom" may be used as a pretext to teach systems which destroy all free- 
dom. We proudly boast that it has always taught and always will teach 
the following creed: 

We believe in God 

We believe in the personal dignity of man 

We believe that man has certain rights which come from God 
and not from the State 

We therefore are opposed to all forms of dictatorships which 
hold that the "total man" (totalitarianism) belongs to the State 

We believe in the sanctity of the home — the basic unit of Society 
We believe in the natural right of private property, but life- 
wise that private property has its social obligations 
We believe that Labor has not only rights but obligations 
We believe that Capital has not only rights but obligations 

We are vigorously opposed to all forms of racism — persecution 
or intolerance because of race 

We believe that liberty is a sacred thing, but that law, which 
regulates liberty, is a sacred obligation 

We believe in inculcating all the essential liberties of American 

Democracy and ta\e open and fran\ issue with all brands of 
spurious "democracy!' 

We believe, briefly, in the teachings of Christ, who held that mortality 
must regulate the personal, family, economic, political and international life 
of men if civilization is to endure. 

Page Twelve Spring Hill College 






A J 





SPRING HILL COLLEGE CHAPEL 




MOBILE 
HALL 




THOMAS 

BYRNE 

MEMORIAL 

LIBRARY 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

AND 

REGULATIONS 




GENERAL INFORMATION 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 

The first bishop of Mobile, the Right Reverend Michael Portier, 
D.D., laid the cornerstone of the first building of Spring Hill Col- 
lege on July 4, 1830. It stood on the site of the present Administra- 
tion Building and was opened for classes in November, 1831. Five 
years later, the Governor of Alabama signed the legislative bill 
which chartered the Bishop's seminary-college and gave it "full 
power to grant or confer such degree or degrees in the arts and 
sciences, or in any art or science ... as are usually granted or con- 
ferred by other seminaries of learning in the United States." This 
power was used in the following year, 1837, when four graduates 
received their degrees. Spring Hill thus takes its place among the 
three oldest colleges in the South, while of Jesuit Boarding Colleges, 
it is the oldest after Georgetown. 

As the years went on and the college enrollment rose from thirty 
to more than a hundred, the Bishop found it more and more dif- 
ficult to provide from the limited personnel of his missionary clergy 
the necessary minimum of priest-teachers and administrators. The 
first two Presidents of Spring Hill were called away to be Bishops, 
one to Dubuque (Bishop Loras), the other to Vincennes (Bishop 
Bazin), and the third, Father Mauvernay died after a very brief 
term of office. Reluctantly, Bishop Portier was compelled to trans- 
fer his college to a newly arrived French Congregation, the Fathers 
of Mercy. With little or no experience in teaching, these zealous 
missionaries found the direction of Spring Hill a thankless task 
and gave it up after two years. A similar experiment with the 
Eudists succeeded no better, and in 1845 the College suspended 
operations, pending some new arrangement. 

In this crisis the Lyons province of the Society of Jesus was per- 
suaded to take over Spring Hill, and the new regime was inaugu- 
rated with Father Francis Gautrelet, S.J., as President, in Septem- 
ber, 1847. Since that time through many vicissitudes, the Jesuit 
Fathers have directed the policies of the college and endeavored 
to make a center of liberal culture. During the Civil War, studies 

Bulletin of Information Page Fifteen 



continued without interruption, but a costly fire in 1869 destroyed 
the main building and required the removal of students and faculty 
to St. Charles College, Grand Coteau, Louisiana. Through the 
generous aid of many friends, particularly Bishop Quinlan, "the 
second founder," a new building rose on the site of the old, and 
the new Spring Hill opened its doors. 

Until 1921 the High School and College Departments were not 
perfectly separate in organization and faculty, but after that date, 
a more clear-cut division was noticeable. Within a few years new 
buildings arose on the western side of the campus, and thither the 
college removed for classes and recreation. With the close of the 
term in 1935, the High School department was discontinued, and 
the whole plant thus given over to the needs of the college.* 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The College Campus occupies some 700 acres of the elevation 
which gives its name to this residential suburb of Mobile. The 
city and bay are both visible from the hill and easily accessible 
either by bus line or by the famous Old Shell Road, which passes 
the college gates. The village of Spring Hill has a post office, but 
no railroad station. The prospective student or visitor will there- 
fore come first to Mobile, a beautiful city of the Oold South, now 
nationally famous for its Azalea Trail. 

Spring Hill is on the Azalea Trail, just six miles from the center 
of the city. The natural beauty of its well-chosen site, adorned with 
an almost endless variety of trees and shrubs and flowers, its lake, 
its shaded avenues, and the striking setting of its athletic fields and 
its buildings make the campus one of the most attractive in the 
United States. 

Owing to its altitude and the invigorating influence of its 
resinous pines upon the surrounding atmosphere, Spring Hill holds 
one of the best records for health in the country. The air is pure 
and bracing, and even in the hottest summer months, the tempera- 
ture, thanks to the nearby Gulf, is usually several degrees lower 
than in the neighboring city. The mildness of the climate all the 
year round makes it possible for outdoor sports to continue with- 
out interruption. 

The Administration Building stands on the site of the first 
building which Bishop Portier erected for his pioneer college. The 

*Those interested in the full story of the first hundred years of Spring Hill should read 
M. Kenny, S.J., The Torch on the Hill (Centenary History of Spring Hill College) Spring 
Hill College, Spring Hill, Alabama. 

Page Sixteen Spring Hill College 



present plant, erected partly in 1869, partly in 1909, to replace the 
damage caused by historic fires, is a brick structure several hundred 
feet in length and three stories high. Covered Spanish colonnades 
join it to the Dining Hall on the west, the Infirmary on the east, 
and the Chapel on the north. The building itself is occupied by 
the Faculty and the administrative offices. Class rooms are also 
located in this building. 

The Infirmary Building is the only building in present use 
which antedates the fire of 1869. On the first floor is located the 
pharmacy under the charge of a registered nurse; and the rooms 
on the second floor are equipped to take care of all ordinary cases 
of illness. 

The Refectory Building across the quadrangle from the In- 
firmary contains the dining halls for faculty and students. The 
faculty hall upstairs is brightened by the painting which Napoleon's 
uncle, Cardinal Fesch, presented to his friend Bishop Portier for 
his new college. The students' dining hall is on the lower floor. 

The College Chapel, dedicated to the Patron of the College, 
St. Joseph, was built in 1910. It is modified Gothic in style, and 
beautifully appointed within. 

Yenni Hall, erected and named in memory of Father Dominic 
Yenn, S.J., Professor of Latin and Greek at Spring Hill for over 
fifty years, and author of Yenni's Latin and Greek Grammars, is 
entirely devoted to Science. Here are installed on different floors 
the Physics, Chemistry, and Biology lecture rooms and laboratories, 
and the Seismographic Station. 

The Thomas Byrne Memorial Library, the newest building 
on the campus is the gift of Mrs. Byrne in memory of her husband 
and son. It was completed in 1930. It has room for 150,000 volumes. 
The general reading room is large enough to accommodate 100 
students at one time. There are besides smaller rooms for research 
and conference, and one large lecture room. A special section of 
the building contains the Lavretta Library, donated by Mr. L. C. 
Lavretta, a Mobile Alumnus. 

The College Inn is a recreation center midway between the 
golf course and Mobile Hall. Recently redecorated, it contains a 
lounge, a little theatre, and dance hall. 

The Gymnasium is located in a building just west of the Dining 
Hall. It contains a basketball court, locker rooms, and showers. 

Quinlan Hall is the name given to the long corridor of rooms, 
built over the Gymnasium - Auditorium Building in 1916, and 

Bulletin of Information Page Seventeen 



named in honor of Spring Hill's second founder, Bishop Quinlan. 
There are 40 living rooms in the building, each equipped with 
clothes-press and lavatory. 

Mobile Hall is the largest dormitory building. Dedicated 
November 6, 1927, it gave a new center to the college campus. 
Built on modern lines and with ample provision for the future 
growth of the college, it has space and equipment for housing 
over 100 students. Currently some of the rooms on the first floor 
have been arranged as offices and classrooms. The living room in 
this building are bright and airy, and provided with every mod- 
ern convenience. 

Cummings Hall and Kenny Hall, named respectively for a 
deceased President and Dean of the College, Father Edward 
Cummings, and for its historian and long-time Philosophy Profes- 
sor, the late Father Michael Kenny, are temporary dormitory build- 
ings. 

Other campus buildings include the Sodality Chapel, a campus 
landmark recently renovated, an Animal House for biology de- 
partment material and the Chemistry Annex containing laboratory 
space for freshman chemistry classes. 



Pagn Eighteen Spring Hill College 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND 
EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

The College requires for admission the satisfactory completion of a four 
year course in a secondary school approved by a recognized accrediting 
agency. All candidates for admission to Freshman year must present sixteen 
units in acceptable subjects. A unit represents a year's study in any subject, 
constituting approximately a quarter of a full year's work. This definition 
of a unit takes the four-year high school as a basis and assumes that the length 
of the school year is from thirty-six to forty weeks, that a period is from 
forty-five to sixty minutes in length, and that the study is pursued for four 
or five periods a week. Candidates are admitted either by certificate or by 
examination. 

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE 

Admission unconditionally by certificate is granted applicants from ap- 
proved secondary schools provided: (1) their 16 high school units include 
12 of strictly academic nature (i.e., English, Mathematics, Languages, His- 
tory, Natural Science, Social Science), and specifically such as correlate in 
the opinion of the Board of Admission with the course which the candidates 
intend to pursue; (2) that the student's rank in his high school class be bet- 
ter than rhat of the lowest quartile or alternatively, that more than half of 
his grades be better than D; and (3) that there is satisfactory evidence of 
personal character and other qualities deemed requisite by the College for 
desirable students. 

Students from countries where the English language is not the vernacular 
are required to have a sufficient mastery of the English language to enable 
them to follow class lectures without difficulty. No special classes in English 
will be provided by the college for these students. 

Blank forms of entrance certificates which are to be used in every case 
may be had on application to the Registrar. Certificates must be made out 
and signed by the Principal, or other recognized officer of the secondary 
school, and sent by him directly to the Registrar. Such certificates upon sub- 
mission become the property of the College, whether the applicant is ac- 
cepted or not. 

ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 

Applicants, who are not entitled to admission by certificate, may with 
permission of the Board of Admission take examinations for admission. 
These examinations are held during the first week of September. Appli- 
cants who are rejected for reasons of character or academic ranking are not 
eligible for these examinations. 

Bulletin of Information Page Nineteen 



ADMISSION ON PROBATION 

Upon special recommendation of their Principal, graduates of four year 
non-accredited high schools will be admitted without examination on pro- 
bation for their first semester, provided they fully satisfy the quantitative 
and qualitative entrance requirements enumerated above. Admission on pro- 
bation, but with a limited schedule, may also be granted by the Board of 
Admissions to students who though otherwise acceptable are ranked in the 
lowest quartile of their high school class, provided there is additional evi- 
dence of seriousness of purpose and reasonable prospect of success in college. 
Students on probation are liable to dismissal for poor scholarship at the end 
of the semester unless they pass every subject in their limited schedule. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Students applying for admission from other institutions of collegiate rank 
will be given advanced standing provided the courses taken are considered 
comparable to those given at Spring Hill. In the evaluation of previous work, 
no credit will be accepted for work done with less than a C average for the 
year. The transfer student must also present an honorable dismissal from 
the last institution attended. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Mature and earnest students who either are lacking in the required units 
or wish to pursue particular studies without reference to graduation, may 
be admitted by the permission of the Dean to such courses of their own 
choice as they seem qualified to take. The work done by these students can- 
not be counted later on toward a degree unless all entrance requirements 
have been satisfied. 

PART-TIME COURSES 

For the convenience of teachers and others who have satisfied the require- 
ments of college entrance, the College offers special courses in college sub- 
jects leading to the various bachelor degrees. Students who have not satisfied 
the requirements for college entrance also may enroll in these courses for the 
cultural value and general information to be gained thereby, but credit will 
not be granted until the proper entrance credentials have been approved and 
filed. 

This part-time work is offered in Summer Session, in an Evening Divi- 
sion, and in Special Courses for Nurses. 

Summer Session 

The Summer Session runs for six weeks for a maximum of eight semester 
hours. The bulletin of this session is published in April. The dates of sum- 
mer session are announced in the calendar. 

Page Twenty Spring Hill College 



Nurses Courses 

For the student nurses of the Nursing Schools of City Hospital and Provi- 
dence Hospital of Mobile, special courses are offered in Biology, Chemistry, 
Philosophy, Psychology, Religion and Sociology. By special arrangement these 
courses are also open to other qualified students on a part-time basis. 

The Nurses' courses begin the fourth Monday in September and continue 
through the year till the third Saturday in May, with the usual holidays in- 
dicated in the College Calendar. 

STATEMENT OF THE OBJECTIVES 

Ultimate Objectives 

As a Jesuit Liberal Art College, Spring Hill has the same primary pur- 
pose at the Catholic educational system taken in its entirety. This is best 
expressed in the words of Pope Pius XI: "The proper and immediate end of 
Christian education is to cooperate with divine grace in forming the true 
and perfect Christian, that is, to form Christ Himself in those regenerated 
by baptism . . . The true Christian, product of Christian education, is the 
supernatural man who thinks, judges and acts constantly and consistently 
in accordance with right reason, illuminated by the supernatural light of 
the example and teaching of Christ; in other words, to use the current term, 
the true and finished men of character." 

Immediate Objectives 

It is in terms of this end that the Jesuit College of Liberal Arts conceives 
its special function in contemporary American life. Obviously, then, it will 
not neglect the field of religion. Instruction in Catholic faith and morals will 
always be a part of its task. But it is not the whole. The Jesuit college by 
its traditions can never be content with simply presenting Catholicism as a 
creed, a code or a cult. It must strive to communicate the riches of Catholi- 
cism as a culture, thus giving the modern man a coign of vantage whence 
to view with understanding not merely the facts in the natural order, but 
those in the supernatural order also, those facts which give meaning and 
coherence to the whole life. 

Jesuit education regards the college of liberal arts as the heart of its 
system. It is through the instrumentality of such colleges that Catholic leaders 
will be formed, men and women who have been trained spiritually and intel- 
lectually in the Catholic sense, who have intelligent and appreciative contact 
with Catholicism as a culture, who through their general education in the 
college of arts have so developed their powers of mind and heart and will that 
they can take an active part in the service of Church and society. 

The Jesuit college in its teaching aims at reaching the whole man, his 
intellect, his will, his emotions, his senses, his imagination, his aesthetic sensi- 
bilities, his memory, and his powers of expression. It seeks to lift up man's 
whole being to that broad, spiritual outlook on life whereby he not only 
understands and appreciates the fact that our entire social heritage is bound 
up with the Truth, Goodness and Beauty of God as seen in Revelation, 
Nature, Art and Language, but is likewise willing and ready to become 
identified with those activities, individual as well as collective, that make 
for the sanctification of the individual and the betterment of society. 

Bulletin of Information Page Twenty-one 



The Jesuit college strives to provide a broad foundation in general educa- 
tion, upon which advanced study in a special field may be built. 

Vocational Objectives 

In addition to these objectives held in common with all Jesuit colleges, 
Spring Hill aims by proper direction in the choice of elective studies to pre- 
pare her graduates for successful work in professional schools, in business, 
and in teaching. 

Specific Objectives of the Various Academic Degrees 

The objective of the Arts (A.B.) degree or curriculum is to give a bal- 
anced cultural education as a foundation for full living. This objective is 
to be atained through the humanistic and pholosophic disciplines, supple- 
mented by training in scientific and mathematical thinking, the entire cur- 
riculum to be integrated by acquaintance with the social and religious factors 
that have entered into the making of Western civilization, and that con- 
tribute to the solution of contemporary problems. 

The objective of the Science (B.S.) degree or curriculum is to give by 
means of natural sciences, or social sciences, a thorough training in the 
scientific method as a basis of sound scientific thinking, balanced by cul- 
tural training in language, literature and history, and correlated as intimately 
as possible with scholastic philosophy. 

The objective of the Commerce (B.S.C.) degree or curriculum is to give 
a systematic and balanced training in the problems and principles of business 
administration with specialization in one of three fields related to the world 
of commerce, supplemented by cultural work in language, history and scho- 
lastic philosophy. 

Objectives of Pre-professional Curricula 

The Pre-Legal Course prepares the student for admission to various 
recognized Law Schools of the United States by three years of degree work, 
with emphasis on the social sciences. 

The Pre-Medical Course enables the students to fulfill the entrance re- 
quirements of the various Class A Medical Schools taking three years of 
degree work with emphasis on the pre-medical sciences. 

The Pre-Dental Course in three years qualifies the student for admis- 
sion to various Class A. Dental Schools. The curriculum is much the same 
as that of the pre-medical course. 

The Engineering Course supplies the mathematical deficiencies of the 
beginning engineering student and gives him at least the first year of basic 
engineering, common to all engineering curricula. To finish his course the 
student must transfer after one or two years to a fully accredited Engineer- 
ing School. 

The Nursing Course, while preparing the nursing students of the City 
Hospital and Providence Hospital of Mobile for their diplomas as Registered 
Nurses, gives them two years of accredited courses towards a Bachelors' de- 
gree in Nursing Education. 



Page Twenty-two Spring Hill College 



THE GOVERNMENT AND THE WELFARE 
OF THE STUDENTS 



THE DISCIPLINE 

Spring Hill is committed to the belief that a system of education which 
discounts the formation of character is pernicious. For this reason oppor- 
tunity is given to learn the important lesson of obedience to salutary laws 
and restraints. Everywhere necessary for ordered living, discipline is impera- 
tive when restless youths are forming a community of their own, as they 
do in a boarding school. Whatever the age of the students, and their opinion 
of their abilities to shape their own lives, the authorities of the school feel 
for their charges the responsibility of a parent. Rules are therefore made gov- 
erning the out-of-class life of the students, particularly their social activities 
and absences from the campus. These rules and the sanctions for their ob- 
servance are made known to the student from the beginning. Their enforce- 
ment, while considerate, is unflinchingly firm. Campus discipline is admin- 
istered through the office of the Dean of Men. 

DISCIPLINARY PENALTIES 

Naturally, in addition to minor breaches of college discipline, there occur 
at times serious offenses which require drastic punishment, even suspension 
or dismissal from college. Such are: serious insubordination, repeated vio- 
lation of regulations, neglect of studies, possession or use of intoxicating 
liquors; habitual use of obscene or profane language, and in general any 
serious forms of immorality. In cases of the suspension or dismissal of a 
student for such reason the tuition fee is not refunded. 

Without committing any overt act of the kind described in the preceding 
paragraph, a student may at times by constant and ill-founded criticism, or 
an habitual attitude of opposition to the college government become an un- 
desirable member of the community. For such cases the college reserves the 
right to request any student to withdraw from school, with, however, an 
honorable dismissal, and the refund of such fees as may be refundable by the 
treasurer's regulations. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE OF STUDENTS 

The College is a Catholic institution intended primarily for Catholic 
students, but it does not exclude those of other religious beliefs who may 
wish to take advantage of its system of education. As a rule about 25 per 
cent of the whole student body, and about 5 per cent of the boarding stu- 
dents are non-Catholic. Special courses in religion are provided for non- 
Catholics to replace the required courses in Catholic religion. They are per- 
mitted and encouraged to attend their own religious obligations on Sunday. 
By exception they are expected and required to assist as a part of the student 
body at the collegiate chapel services listed in the annual College Calendar- 

Bulletin of Information Page Twenty-three 



The Catholic students are given every opportunity to learn their religion 
in theory and in practice. A graded course in Religion is offered, running 
through four years, and all Catholics are obliged to register for these courses. 
Credits are given for the courses and required for graduation. 

Week-day Mass is required of all Catholic boarding students. Frequent, 
even daily, Communion is encouraged and quite generally practiced. Special 
devotions are practiced towards the Sacred Heart on the first Friday of the 
month, and towards the Blessed Virgin Mary during the months of October 
and May. A wonderful occasion of grace for many is the annual three-day 
Retreat given in the first semester and obligatory on all Catholic students, 
boarders and day scholars alike. The day scholars will be charged a nomi- 
nal fee for board and lodging during the three days of the exercises. 

One of the Fathers on the faculty is appointed as counsellor or advisor 
of the students. His principal duty is to direct the spiritual activities of the 
college and the various religious societies and sodalities, in regard to which 
he exercises much the same supervision as the Dean of Men exercises in his 
department. 

veterans' education 

The College is approved for the education of Veterans under the Gl Bill 
of Rights and Public Law 16. Accordingly it is the policy of the school to 
afford these men every opportunity for study compatible with their educa- 
tional background and the scope of the institution. 

Full credit will be given for courses and training completed in military 
service. In this matter the college will be guided by the American Council 
on Education in its publication entitled, Guide to the Evaluation of Educa- 
tional Experiences in the Armed Services. 

Special guidance is provided for the veterans and special facilities are 
offered for their admission by examination when their high school course 
was interrupted by war service. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

As college education is accomplished not only during the hours of class 
but also in no small degree during the students' interchange of ideas at other 
periods, the College heartily encourages all student organizations which help 
to develop in the student initiative, self-reliance and leadership in organized 
religious and social movements, qualities which are expected of college men 
generally. 

PRINCIPAL STUDENT GROUPS 
Student Council 

This is the co-ordinating group for all the campus organizations. Repre- 
sentation on the council is enjoyed by all the recognized clubs. The President 
of the Council is elected by the student-body and represents them in all 
petitions to the faculty. 
Sodality of the Immaculate Conception 

The Sodality began its work at Spring Hill in 1847 and has never ceased 
to represent the loyalty of the students to the Mother of God. Regular meet- 
ings are held, and various works of zeal nad charity undertaken under the 

Page Twenty-jour Spring Hill College 



sponsorship of this organization. Closely conected with the Sociality are the 
Apostleship of Prayer, and the St. John Berchmans Sanctuary Society, the one 
fostering the ideal of reparation, and the other the liturgical movement. 

Alpha Sigma Nu 

This is the Jesuit Honor Fraternity open to those holding highest academic 
rank in the Senior class. 

Portier Debating Academy 

The purpose of this organization, named for the founder of the college, 
is to foster forensics. From its ranks the intercollegiate debating team is 
usually chosen. 

The Yenni Dramatic Society 

This society, an offshoot of the Portier in 1935, aims to develop a practical 
interest in the drama. 

Beta Beta Beta 

This national fraternity in biology has a very active chapter at Spring Hill. 
Meetings are held twice a month, with guest speakers a frequent attraction. 
The Mendelian is published monthly by the group. 

Chemical Society 

The Chemical Society, restricted to Chemistry majors, engages in such 
activities as are calculated to foster a professional attitude toward and pride 
in chemistry. Application has been made for a charter as a chapter of Stu- 
dent Affiliates of the American Chemical Society. Meetings are held on the 
fourth Sunday of each month. 

International Relations Club 

The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace approved in 1940 the 
opening of this campus club at Spring Hill. The purpose of its monthly 
meetings is to enlighten student opinion on world affairs. A special library 
is maintained. 

Philomelic Academy 

This youngest organiaztion on the Spring Hill campus is devoted to the 
study and appreciation of classical as well as modern music masters. Its 
meetings and auditions are open to the public. 

Publications 

The students publish, under faculty supervision, the following publications: 

The Springhillian, the fortnightly newspaper of campus activities and 
opinions. 

The Motley, a literary magazine. 

The Spring Hill S Book, a Manual for Freshmen. 

The Torch, annual publication. 

ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

In intercollegiate athletic competition, Spring Hill is a member of the 
Gulf States Conference, composed of colleges in Louisiana, Mississippi and 
Alabama and its athletic teams engage those of other colleges in basketball 
baseball, tennis and golf. 

Bulletin of Information Page Twenty-jive 



Intramural sports play an adequate part in the extra-curricular life of 
the student body at Spring Hill. Facilities for various seasonal intramural 
sports are available on the campus. With participation optional, teams are 
former under the guidance of the intramural director for competition in 
touch-football, basketball and softball. Off-campus intramural athletics in- 
clude among others, a bowling league. Trophies are provided for the win- 
ners in the various intramural sports. 

Tennis courts, an eighteen-hole golf course and a large spring-fed lake 
are other facilities offered for student participation in athletic activity. 



Page Twenty-six Spring Hill College 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



SESSIONS 

The school year begins in the middle of September and ends in the be- 
ginning of June. The year is divided into two semesters of sessions of 
eighteen weeks each. The first semester ends during the last week of Jan- 
uary. The second begins immediately thereafter, without mid-year holidays. 

ATTENDANCE 

Since the purpose of college education is not only to impart information 
and develop the mental faculties, but also, if not chiefly, to train the student 
in habits of punctuality and fidelity to duty, prompt attendance at all class 
meetings is constantly stressed, and the co-operation of parents and guardians 
in this important matter is earnestly requested. The date of registration and 
the limits of the various holiday periods are clearly stated in this catalogue, 
and will be strictly adhered to. 

Although for grave reasons the Dean may grant an excuse from class at- 
tendance, the responsibility for seeing to it that unauthorized absences from 
class meetings do not exceed the tolerated maximum rests directly on the in- 
dividual student (the tolerated maximum equals the number of class meetings 
per week of the course). The penalty for excessive absence in any course is 
cancellation of the student's registration in that course, and accordingly no 
credit will be given for the course. In special cases the delinquent may be 
reinstated by the Committee on Appeals upon written petition of the student. 
Absences immediately preceding and following holiday periods count triple. 

Failure in prompt attendance is regarded as a partial absence or total 
absence, if in excess of ten minutes. Two partial absences will be equivalent 
to one absence. No absences from laboratory periods are excused and missed 
laboratory work must be done at the convenience of the instructor. These 
extra laboratory periods are subject to special fee (see Fees and Expenses). 

AMOUNT OF WORK 

The unit for computing the amount of a student's work is the semester 
hour, which is defined as approximately one hour of class lecture, recitation 
or demonstration per week for a semester. Two hours of preparation by the 
student for each class hour is presumed. Laboratory periods are double. Id 
general, one semester hour represents for the average student ordinarily about 
three hours of actual work each week throughout one semester, divided ap- 
propriately between lecture or laboratory periods and out-of-class preparation. 
A normal student load is about seventeen hours per week and no candidate 
for a degree will be allowed to register for fewer than twelve hours; unusual 
programs need special approval of the Dean for completion of registration. 

Bulletin of Information Page Twenty-seven 



EXAMINATIONS AND GRADES 

Final examinations are held in all courses at the end of each semester, 
Student grades in various courses are determined by these examinations to- 
gether with all intra-semestral recitations, quizzes and tests. Missed exami- 
nations, with or without justifying excuse, must be taken eventually. 

The following system of grading is used. Each semester hour of credit 
is valued as follows: 

A excellent, with 3 quality points per hour of credit. 

B good, with 2 quality points per hour of credit. 

C fair, with 1 quality point per hour of credit. 

D deficient, but passed without quality points. 

E not passed, but entitled to re-examination for passing grade. 

F failed without right to re-examination. 

The student should note that the grade D, although passing, indicates 
unsatisfactory wor\. 

A grade of E may be incurred for deficiency in recitations, quizzes, exami- 
nations or other assigned work. Deficiency in examinations is removable by 
supplementary examination, subject to fee payable in advance, to be admin- 
istered on dates set by the Dean; failing to register for these supplementary 
examinations upon official publication of schedule by the Dean's office the 
student waives his right to re-examination. Successful completion of supple- 
mentary examination entitles the student to a grade of D only. Deficiency due 
to failure to complete assigned work may be removed by making up the re- 
quired work. This ordinarily entails a fine of one dollar and, where labora- 
tory work is required, the additional fees for make-up laboratory periods. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION AND SUSPENSION 

Failure to pass at least three courses in any semester renders a student 
liable to dismissal for poor scholarship. Exception to this rule is made only 
for weighty reasons. 

Low grades and neglect of work within the semester render a student 
liable to probation, including exclusion from extra-curricular activities; and 
failure to improve will entail reduction of schedule with a permanent record 
of failure in the subject cancelled. 

A test in proficiency in English will be given all Sophomores. Should any 
prove unsatisfactory, they will be required to take a course in remedial Eng- 
lish. Passing this course by the beginning of their last semester is a condi- 
tion of graduation. 

STUDENT RANKING 

Those students are ranked as Sophomores who have at least twenty-four 
credit hours and points and have completed the prescribed courses of Fresh- 
man year; Juniors, those who have fifty-six credits and points and have com- 
pleted the prescribed courses of the Sophomore year; Seniors, those who have 
ninety-two credit hours and points and have completed the prescribed courses 
of the Junior year. 

REPORTS 

At least four times a year, i.e., in November, January, April and July de- 
tailed reports of scholarship and conduct are issued from the Dean't office. 

Page Twenty-eight Spring Hill College 



At other times also similar reports will be furnished to interested parents or 
guardians upon request. 

WITHDRAWAL 

Students who for any reason withdraw from college during the semester 
must give pievious notice to the Registrar. Failure to do this within reason- 
able time will incur forfeiture of right to an honorable dismissal. 

TRANSCRIPT OF RECORD 

Students wishing transcript of records in order to transfer from this col- 
lege to another, or for any other purpose, should make early and seasonable 
application for the same. No statements will be made out during the busy 
periods of examinations and registrations. The first transcript of record is 
furnished free. For each additional copy there is a charge of one dollar. 

ADMISSION TO CONCENTRATION 

Toward the end of his sophomore year each student is to elect a subject 
for his major concentration. This election, however, is to be made only after 
consultation with the academic adviser. Students may be admitted to any 
program of concentration that they desire, provided they have completed 
with a C grade or better all the prerequisites to their chosen department of 
concentration. Exceptions to this will be rare and will be made only with 
the consent of the Dean and the chairman of the department concerned. 



Bulletin of Information Page Twenty-nine 



PROGRAMS OF CURRICULA 



Although there are students who, when they enter college, have not made 
up their minds with any degree of certainty as to the career that they in- 
tend to follow, this does not mean that even their program cannot be con- 
structive. In any instance the directing principle of a well-planned program 
of studies should not be chiefly vocational. A student who intends to study 
medicine will naturally see that he includes all those subjects which the medi- 
cal school require for admission, but in addition he should not forget that 
a good doctor must also be a good human being and that he needs besides 
his specialized medical knowledge a wide range of interests and cultivated 
tasts. The best medical schools prefer candidates woh have not had a nar- 
rowly specialized training in college. Similarly, a student who is planning 
to go into law or engineering should not try to limit himself in college to 
subjects which appear to be immediately contributory to legal or engineering 
studies. A student, when making his choice of program, must realize that 
preseumably he has before himself a lifetime of necessary specialization, but 
only three 01 four years of freedom in which to study the interrelation of 
ideas and knowledge, to broaden his intellectual interest and human sympa- 
thies, to fit himself to take his part as an intelligent man in the social, eco- 
nomic, political and religious order that lies ahead of him. 

The ideal college education should prepare a man to live — physically, men- 
tally and spiritually — up to his fullest capacity, to cooperate with and under- 
stand other men while still preserving the integrity of his own individual 
character, to establish for himself the standards of thinking and conduct which 
shall give direction to all his activities, to see new possibilities in existing 
conditions of life and to adapt himself to other conditions in which he may 
find himself in the future. An education so conceived is what is called a 
liberal education as opposed to an education restricted to vocational training. 
In a liberal education mathematics and the sciences, literature and the other 
arts, history, philosophy and religion are studied as means to liberalizing the 
human spirit, to freeing a man from the narrowing restrictions of a single 
environment and the single age in which he lives. An adequate knowledge 
of the past is our only means of acquiring the necessary experience with 
which to meet the future. Such an education as is described here can pre- 
pare a man adequately for the privileges and the responsibilities of citizen- 
ship in the world of today. 

The programs of curricula listed below are designed to assist the student 
in the achievement of the goals outlined above. For convenience of reference 
these programs of curricula are listed in some detail. Numbers in parentheses 

Page Thirty Spring Hill College 



indicate semester hours of credit required in various subjects. Special atten- 
tion is called to the following requirement, applicable in all instances where 
modern language study is part of the curriculum. 

Those who ta\e an Elementary Modern Language in Freshman year are 
obliged to continue the same language in Sophomore year; the degree re~ 
quirement is successful passing of a reading test given after the Intermediate 
course. 

ACADEMIC CURRICULA 

Art Course (A.B.) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Latin (3), Greek or Modern Language (3), English (3), Mathematics 
(3), Science (4), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Latin (3), Greek or Modern Language (3), Mathematics (3), Science 
(4), Religion (2), English (3). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Latin (3), Greek or Modern Language (3), English Literature (3), 
Sociology (3), Logic (3), Speech (2), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Latin (3), Greek or Modern Language (3), English Literature (3), 
Sociology (3), Metaphysics (3), Art (2), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Psychology (3), History (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Elec- 
tees (9). 

Second semester: Theodicy (3), History (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Elec- 
tives (9). 
SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Ethics (3), History of Philosophy (2), Religion (2), Major and Minor 
Electives (9). 

Second semester: Ethics (3), Religion («2), Major and Minor Electives (9). 

Science Courses (B.S.) 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Botany (4), Chemistry (4), French or German (3), English (3), 
Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Zoology (4), Chemistry (4), French or German (3), English (3), 
Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), English (3), Chemistry (4), French or German (3), 
Logic (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Biology (4), English (3), Chemistry (4), French or German (3), 
Metaphysics (3), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Psychology (3), History (3), Religion (2). 
Second semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Theodicy (3), History (3), Religion (2). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Biology (6), Chemistry (4), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (2). 

Second semester: Biology (4), History and Philosophy of Biology (2), Ethics (3), 
Religion (2), Electives (4). 

Btdletin of Information Page Thirty-one 



CHEMISTRY 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: General Inorganic Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), Mod 
ern Language (3), Drawing (2) or Biology (4), Religion (2). 

Second semester: General Inorganic Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3) 
Modern Language (3), Drawing (2) or Biology (4), Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Quantitative analysis (4), Physics (4), Modern Language (3), Logii 
(3), Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Quantitative analysis (;4), Physics (4), Modern Language (3), Meta 
physics (3), Religion (2), Mathematics (3). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Organic Chemistry (4), Phychology (3), English (3), Religion (2] 
History (3), Electricity and magnetism (4). 

Second semester: Organic Chemistry (4), Theodicy (3), English (3), Religion (2) 
History (3), Electricity and magnetism (4). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Physical Chemistry (5), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Major and minoi j 
electives (6). 

Second semester: Physical Chemistry (5), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Major and minoi 
electives (6). 

MATHEMATICS 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Mathematics (3), Chemistry (4), English (3), French or German (3), 
Religion (2). 

Second semester: Mathematics (3), Chemistry (4), English (3), French or German 
(3), Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Calculus I (3), General Physics (4), English (3), Logic (3), French 
or German (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Calculus II (3), General Physics (4), English (3), Metaphysics (3), 
French or German (3), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Mathematics (3), Psychology (3), Religion (2), History (3), Minor 
Electives (6). 

Second semester: Mathematics (3), Hheodicy (3), Religion (2), History (3), Minor 
Electives (6). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Mathematics (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (9). 
Second semester: Mathematics (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (9). 

PHYSICS 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), French or German (3), 
Religion (2). 

Second semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), French or German (3), 
Religion (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: General Physics (4), English (3), Calculus I (3), Logic (3), Religion 
(2) French or German (3). 

Second semester: General Physics (4), English (3), Calculus II (3), General Meta- 
physics (3), Religion (2), French or German (3). 

Page Thirty-two Spring Hill College 



UNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Physics (6), Differential Equations (3), Psychology (3), History (3), 
eligion (2). 

Second semester: Physics (6), Theodicy (3), History (3), Religion (2), Elective 
Mathematics suggested) (3), 

First semester: Physics (4), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (8). 

Second semester: Physics (4), Ethics (3), Religion (2), Electives (8). 

Social Science Course (B.S.) 

RESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Modern Language (3), Science or Mathematics (3-4), English (3), 
History (3), Sociology or Political Science (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Modern Language (3), Science or Mathematics (3-4), English (3), 
listory (3), Sociology or Political Science (3), Religion (2). 

OPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Modern Language (3), English (3), Logic (3), Economics (3), Soci- 
ology or Political Science (3), Public Speaking (2), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Modern Language (3), English (3), Metaphysics (3), Economics (3), 
ociology or Political Science (3), Religion (2). 

UNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Philosophy (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Electives (12). 
Second semester: Philosophy (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Electives (12). 

ENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Ethics (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Electives (<9). 
Second semester: Ethics (3), Religion (2), Major and Minor Electives (9). 

PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Commerce Courses (B.S.C.) 

The program of courses offered at Spring Hill College in the various 
:ields of commerce embraces an intensive training in Accounting, Banking 
2nd Finance, General Business, Industrial Management, and Merchandising 
is well as a complete training in Economics for students preparing for gradu- 
ate work in that field. Pre-law students are offered a strong business pro- 
gram designed to meet law school requirements. 

The need of a broad foundation in liberal education, as well as general 
survey of the entire business field, is not overlooked in the planned specialized 
courses. All commerce students take a prescribed program of work in the 
freshman year; specialization begins later. 

As a complement to the campus instruction, the department, with the co- 
operation of Mobile business firms, conducts studies of on-the-ground business 
practices. These field trips are designed to bridge the gap between the class- 
room and the plant. 

The professional accounting program is planned to prepare the student 
for work in the executive and public accounting fields. It has been carefully 
organized to fit the requirements for practical professional work and ultimate 
public certification. It also meets maximum requirements in those states 
which require that aspirants to public certification graduate from college 
with specific preparation in accounting, law, finance, economics and the like. 

Bulletin of Information Page Thirty-three 



The Department of Commerce maintains an active employment service 
for its student personnel. Organized confidential records are prepared for 
students desiring aid and are available for examination by prospective 
employers. 

In the choice of electives the student should consult his special adviser 
before registration in any semester. 

GENERAL PROGRAM FOR FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Algebra (3), English (3), History (3), Economics (3), Elementary 
Accounting (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Trigonometry (3), English (3), History (3), Economics (3), Ele- 
mentary Accounting (3), Religion (2). 

ACCOUNTING 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: English (3), Economic Analysis (3), Business Law (3), Intermediate 
Accounting (3), Logic (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: English (3), Economic Analysis (3), Business Law (3), Intermediate 
Accounting (3), Metaphysics (3), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Advanced Accounting (3), Cost Accounting (3), Corporation Finance 
(3), *Money and Banking (3), Psychology (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Advanced Accounting (3), Advanced Cost Accounting (3), Intro- 
duction to Industrial Management (3), *Marketing (3), Theodicy (3), Religion (2). 
SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Income Tax Procedure (3), Elementary Auditing (3), *Business Ad- 
ministration Elective ,(3), Labor Problems (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Income Tax Procedure (3), Advanced Auditing (3), *Business Ad- 
ministration Electives (3), Speech (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: English (3), Economic Analysis (3), Business Law (8), Financial 
Statement Analysis (3), Logic (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: English (3), Economic Analysis (3), Business Law (2), Statistic* 
(3), Metaphysics (3), Religion (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Corporation Finance (3), Labor Problems (3), Money and Banking 
(3), Elective (3), Psychology (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Introduction to Industrial Management (3), Marketing (3), Speech 
(3), Elective (3), Theodicy (3), Religion (2). 
SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Electives in Major Field (6), Electives (5), Ethics (3), Religion (2)j 

Second semester: Business Problems (3), Elective in Major Field (3), Elective (3)j 
Religion (2), Ethics (3). 

MAJOR FIELD ELECTIVES 

Ban\ing and Finance: (choose 3) Investments, Credit Management, Advertising, Sales- 
manship, Bank Administration, Insurance, Real Estate, Transportation, Monetary Theory, 
Business Cycles. 

Industrial Management: (choose 3) Purchasing, Sales Management, Insurance, Time 
and Motion Study, Manufacturing Industries, Advanced Industrial Management Problems, 
Personnel Problems, Labor Law, Industrial Relations, Transportation. 



'Advanced ROTC may be substituted here. 

Page Thirty -four Spring Hill College 



Merchandising: (choose 3) Retailing Problems, Purchasing, Credit Management, Adver- 
j tising, Salesmanship, Sales Management, Insurance, Personnel Problems, Internal Trade, 
! Business Cycles. 

General Business: Three courses chosen from the above fields with the advice and con- 
| sent of the student's major adviser. 

i ECONOMICS 

f SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Economic Analysis (3), English (3), Business Law (3), Modern Lan- 
j guage (3), Logic (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Economic Analysis (3), English (3), Business Law (3), Modern 
I Language (3), Metaphysics (3), Religion (2). 

J JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Money and Banking (3), Financial Statement Analysis (3), Sociology 
(3), Minor Elective (3), Psychology (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Speech (3), Statistics (3), Sociology (3), Minor Elective (3), Theo- 
! dicy (3), Religion (2). 

'\ SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Major Elective (3), Minor Elective (3), Cultural Elective (4), General 
i Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Major Elective (3), Minor Elective (3), Cultural Elective (4), Special 
Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

I COMPOSITE DEPARTMENTAL MAJOR FOR PRE-LEGAL TRAINING 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Same as listed under Business Administration. 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Speech (3), Corporation Finance (3), Elective (3), Sociology (3), Psy- 
i chology (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Speech (3), Public Finance (3), Elective (3), Eociology (3), Theo- 
J dicy (3), Religion (2). 

! SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Labor Problems (3), Income Tax Procedure (3), Political Science (3), 
1 Advanced Speech (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Labor Law (3), Income Tax Procedure (3), Political Science (3), Ad- 
U vanced Speech (3), Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

COMPOSITE DEPARTMENTAL MAJOR FOR COMMERCIAL TEACHING 

This curriculum prepares the student for the Alabama Class B Secondary Professional 
■ Certificate. 
! FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Algebra (3), English (3), History (3), Science (3-4), Economics (3), 
Religion (2). 

Second semester: Trigonometry (3), English (3), History (3), Science (3-4), Eco- 
nomics (3), Religion (2). 

J SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semesters English (3), Sociology (3), Business Law (3), Introduction to Edu- 
cation (3), Logic (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: English (3), Sociology (3), Business Law (3), Education Elective 
! (3), Metaphysics (3), Religion (2). 

I JUNIOR YEAR 

First semester: Elementary accounting (3), Typing (2), Shorthand (2), Political Sci- 
; ence (3), Education Elective (3), Psychology (3), Religion (2). 

Ij Bulletin of Information Page Thirty-five 



Second semester: Elementary Accounting (3), Typing (2), Shorthand (2), Political 
Science (3), Speech (3), Theodicy (3), Religion (2). 

SENIOR YEAR 

First semester: Typing (2), Shorthand (2), Financial Statement Analysis ,('3), Money 
and Banking (3), Education Electives (6), Ethics (3), Religion (3). 

Second semester: Typing (2), Shorthand (2), Statistics (3), Business Administration 
Elective (3), Education Electives (6), Ethics (3), Religion (2). 

Engineering Course 

While Spring Hill College does not have the facilities for a complete 
engineering course in any of its various branches, yet it can and does give 
some of the basic, fundamental instruction common to all branches of en- 
gineering. Attention is called particularly to the necessity of thorough prepa- 
ration in English and Mathematics. It is presupposed that a candidate's train- 
ing in English will enable him to express his ideas clearly either orally or in 
writing. In Mathematics, emphasis should be on a thorough mastery of funda- 
mental principles, operations and definitions rather than on covering a wide 
range of subjects. The student whose high school training is deficient in 
these subjects should consider seriously the possibility that his vocational 
choice of engineering is ill-advised; such procedure can forestall future dis- 
appointments. The first two years of engineering training in all branches is 
nearly uniform and can be partially secured by the following program. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), Engineering Drawing 
(2), Religion (2), General Geology (2). 

Second semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), Mathematics (3), Engineering Drawing 
(2), Religion (2), Engineering Problems (2). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First semester: Calculus I (3), English (3), General Physics (4), Mechanics (2), De- 
scriptive Geometry (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: Calculus II (3), English (3), General Physics (4), Mechanics (2), 
Religion (2), Sruveying (3). 

Pre-Legal Course 

Most law schools admit all applicants who have successfully completed 
three years of a regular college course for a minimum of 90 credit hours. A 
few with higher standards require an A.B. degree. The usual curriculum to 
be followed is that of the B.S. in Eocial Sciences. 

For the student who looks forward to a possible law career in Industrial 
relations, Labor law, Tax law, Corporation law and the like, the special com- 
merce department program for pre-legal training, which leads to a B.S. de- 
gree in commerce as a preliminary to entrance into law school, should be of 
definite interest. It is listed earlier in this bulletin. 

Pre-Dental Course 

Although the minimum requirement for admission to recognized dental 
schools is two years of college work with an emphasis on science courses, in 
practice a student must have completed three of four years of college work 
before he can reasonably expect admission. The following program will assist 
the student in attaining his professional objective. 

Page Thirty-six Spring Hill College 



IRST YEAR 

First semester: General Zoology (4), General Chemistry (4), French or German (3), 
nglish (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: General Zoology (4), General Chemistry (4), French or German (3), 
English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

ECOND YEAR 

First semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), French or German (3), Logic (3), Re- 
igion (2), Physics (4). 

Second semester: Biology (4), English (3), French or German (3), Philosophy (3), 
leligion (2), Physics (4). 

THIRD YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Psychology .('3), History (3), Religion (2). 
Second semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Theodicy (3), History (3), eligion (2). 

Pre-Medical Course 

The minimum requirement for admission to recognized medical schools, 

n addition to the high school requirement, is ninety semester hours of col- 

egiate work extending through three years of at least thirty-two week's each, 

ijin a college approved by the Council of Medical Education of the American 

Medical Association. 

The subjects prescribed for the minimum of three years of college work 
|are as follows: 

Chemistry (12), Physics (8), Biology (8), English composition and literature (6), 
Other non-science subjects (12), French or German (8-12). 

Subjects strongly urged: 

Advanced botany or comparative anatomy (3-6), Psychology (3-6), Algebra and trigo- 
nometry (3-6), Additional courses in chemistry (3-6). 

Other suggested electives: 

English (additional), economics, history, sociology, political scoence, logic, Latin, Greek, 
i drawing. 

The above represents the minimum requirements. It is to serve these that 
the Spring Hill pre-medical program, as outlined below, is designed. The 
ideal preparation for the future doctor and now required by some medical 
schools is the four-year course leading to a B.S., or preferably, an A.B. degree. 
The student in this case, however, should make sure to include in his elective 
studies the courses listed above. 

FIRST YEAR 

First semester: General Zoology (4), General Chemistry (4), French or German (3), 
English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

Second semester: General Zoology (4), General Chemistry (4), French or German (3), 
English (3), Mathematics (3), Religion (2). 

SECOND YEAR 

First semester: Chemistry (4), English (3), French or German (3), Logic (3), Re- 
ligion (2), Physics (4). 

Second semester: Biology (4), English (3), French or German (3), Philosophy (3), 
Religion (2), Physics (4). 

THIRD YEAR 

First semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Psychology (3), History (3), Religion (2). 
Second semester: Biology (4), Chemistry (4), Theodicy (3), History (3), Religion (2). 

Bulletin of Information Page Thirty-seven 



Teacher Training 

Students who wish to prepare for teaching careers in high school may 
fulfill all requirements for necessary teaching certificates while working on 
their degree programs. The requirements for such certification in the State 
of Alabama are outlined below. 

CLASS B SECONDARY TEMPORARY PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE 

A Class B Secondary Temporary Professional Certificate may be issued 
to a person who presents credentials showing: 

1. That he has graduated with a bachelor's or master's degree from a standard in- 
stitution and has met requirements as prescribed by the State Board of Education for the 
training of secondary teachers (Spring Hill is such an institution); 

2. That he has earned prescribed semester hours credits as follows: Education (18), 
including Psychology (3-8), Principles and Philosophy (2-6), Electives in the fields of 
Secondary Education (4-12), English (12), Social Studies (12), including courses, each 
of which has a credit value from 2 to 4 hours in 2 of the following fields: History, Eco- 
nomics, Political Science, Sociology, or Geography; Science (6). 

3. That he has to his credit an academic Major of (J 18) hours in an approved subject; 

4. That he has to his credit an academic minor of (12) hours in an approved subject. 

A Class B secondary Temporary Professional Certificate is valid for a 
period of three years and is the authority of the holder to teach the subjects 
named in its face and other high school subjects as conditions may require. 
This certificate cannot be continued or reinstated. 

If the holder of this certificate expects t ocontinue to teach after it expires, 
he must meet requirements for a Class B secondary Professional Certificate 
or a Class A Secondary Professional Certificate. 

CLASS B SECONDARY PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE 

To the requirements for the Class B Secondary Temporary Professional 
Certificate the following must be added to obtain a Class B Secondary Pro- 
fessional Certificate: 

1. Education (6), including Psychology (3), Principles and Philosophy (2), Materials 
and Methods of Teaching Major or Minor Subject in High School (2-6), Directed Teach- 
ing of Major or Minor Subject in High School (2-8), Electives in the field of Secondary 
Education (0-19); 

2. The academic major in approved subject must be 24 semester hours; 

3. The academic minor in approved subject must be 18 semester hours. 

A Class B Secondary Professional Certificate is a conditional permanent 
certificate which is valid in periods of eight years and is the authority of the 
holder to teach the subjects named in its face and other high school subjects 
as conditions may require. 

NATIONAL TEACHER EXAMINATION 

Students enrolled in the Department of Education must take the National 
Teacher Examination sometime during their course, and make the results of 
these examinations a part of their permanent record. The National Teacher 
Examinations are administered annually at Spring Hill College. The special 
student rate given by the National Office will be charged to the student. 
This rate for the Common and Optional Examinations is $4.50. 
observation and practice teaching 

In order to supplement its instruction in educational principles, aims, 
methods, curricula and procedure, and to cultivate professional skill in teach- 

Page Thirty-eight Spring Hill College 



ing, Spring Hill College has secured the cooperation of the McGill insti- 
tute of Mobile. Though the courtesy of its administration and teachers, this 
school thus becomes the proving ground for the professional students of the 
Department of Education, who have free access to its classrooms for obser- 
vation of the methods practiced therein and for supervised practice teaching. 
Co-operating with the State Department of Education, Spring Hill College 
requires that its candidates for degree with a major in education present a 
minimum of 4 semester hours in observation and practice teaching with a 
minimum of 40 full periods of class teaching and 15 hours of observation. 

Reserve Officers Training Corps 

Spring Hill College has a Transportation Unit of the U. S. Army Re- 
serve Officers Training Corps to provide instruction in Military Science and 
Tactics. The general object of the ROTC is to qualify students for positions 
of leadership in time of national emergency. 

The immediate objective of the four-year course of instruction in miliary 
science and tactics is to produce junior officers with required qualities of 
leadership. Upon successful completion of this course and having also ful- 
filled requirements for an academic degree the student is commissioned a 
Second Lieutenant, Officers Reserve Corps, United States Army. All regu- 
larly enrolled undergraduate students, who are physically qualified and citi- 
zens of the United States between the ages of 14 and 23 are eligible for en- 
rollment. The course is optional and is divided into a two-year basic course 
and a two-year advanced course. Further details of the program will be fur- 
nished upon inquiry. 

Evening Division 

For the benefit of students who are unable to attend classes during the 
day, the evening division offers a variety of courses in downtown Mobile. 
These courses are for the most part from the Department of Commerce. 
However, to satisfy the needs of those who wish to qualify for the bachelor's 
degree, other required courses are given regularly. 

General admission regulations in the evening division are the same as 
those listed earlier in this Bulletin (see admission requirements and educa- 
tional objectives). In addition to the usual college admissions, persons de- 
siring secretarial training through intensive work of this type may enroll 
either as special students or, by including other regular academic courses in 
their program, as candidates for the B.S.C. degree. 

The maximum load for a student in the evening division is twelve hours 
credit per semester. It is possible for a student to satisfy the requirements 
for the bachelor's degree in approximately five and one-half years; this time 
can be shortened considerably by attendance at summer sessions. 

Details of curricula available, dates of registration, fees and other pertinent 
information are available in a separate bulletin. 

Bulletin of Information Page Thirty-nine 



FEES AND EXPENSES 



BASIC FEES 

REGULAR SESSION SUMMER 

PER SEMESTER SESSION 

For all students: 

tuition $150.00 $10.00* 

activity fee 25.00 5.00 

For boarding students only: *Per Credit Hour 

board 180.00 75.00 

room 65.00 30.00 

LAUNDRY 25.00 10.00 

MEDICAL FEE 5.00 5.00 

OTHER FEES 

For new students only: 

MATRICULATION FEE 1 0.00 

ROOM DEPOSIT ( BOARDERS ONLY) 10.00 

Special Fees: (payable each semester where required) 

SCIENCE LABORATORY (FOR EACH COURSE) 7.50 

LABORATORY BREAKAGE DEPOSIT (REFUNDABLE) 5.00 

ACCOUNTING LABORATORY 5.00 

SURVEYING 5.00 

C. P. A. REVIEW COURSE 40.00 

ROTC DEPOSIT ( REFUNDABLE) 20.00 

Miscellaneous Fees: 

CONDITIONAL EXAMINATION (DAY ASSIGNED) 2.00 

CONDITIONAL EXAMINATION ( SPECIAL DAY) 5.00 

SPECIAL TUTORING (PER HOUR) 3.00 

MAKE-UP LABORATORY PERIOD (each) 2.00 

DUPLICATE TRANSCRIPT OF CREDIT 1.00 

FEE FOR LATE REGISTRATION 5.00 

FEE FOR CHANGE OF REGISTRATION 2.00 

GOLF MEMBERSHIP FEE (PER SEMESTER) 12.00 

GRADUATION FEE (PAYABLE FINAL YEAR ONLY) 15.00 

NATIONAL TEACHER EXAMINATION 4.50 

Music Fees: (per semester) 

LESSONS ONE HOUR WEEKLY... 50.00 

USE OF PIANO ONE HOUR DAILY 5.00 



Page Forty 



Spring Hill College 



Activities Fee includes use of the library, ententainments and lectures pro- 
vided by the College authorities, student publications, athletic contests, both 
intercollegiate and intra-mural and courses in physical education. 

Rooms are shared by two occupants. They are equipped with lavatory 
and toilet and are supplied with hot and cold water and all necessary heavy 
furnishings. Students supply their own towels, rugs and whatever decorations 
are appropriate. Arrangements for single occupancy of a room are often 
possible; inquiry should be made early to the Dean of Men. An additional 
fee will be assessed for this privilege by the Treasurer's Office. 

Medical Fee takes care of medical attention by the Staff Physician and 
ordinary nursing in the College Infirmary not in excess of ten days. 

Matriculation Fee, as indicated above, is payable on first entrance only. 

Room Deposit, which must accompany each application for entrance is 
not applied to room rent but is retained to cover any damage beyond reason- 
able wear which may be done to the room or its furnishings while occupied 
by the students. The balance is returned to the parents when the student 
withdraws from the College. In case a student fails to occupy a room after 
reservation, the deposit will not be returned, unless notice of withdrawal is 
received one month before scheduled occupancy of room. 

REGULATIONS OF THE TREASURER 

All checks should be made payable to Spring Hill College and addressed 
directly to the Treasurer's Office. Because of Mobile bank regulations, it is 
requested that Cashier's Checks or Exchange Checks be sent, rather than 
personal checks. A charge of ten cents per fifty dollars will be added to 
personal checks. Those desiring to send Postal Money Orders should have 
them drawn on the Mobile Post Office. Payments made from countries out- 
side continental United States should be made payable in New York or New 
Orleans exchange. 

All minor expenses, for books, stationery, etc., are on a strictly cash basis. 
Money for the personal accounts should be sent directly to the student, who 
alone will be responsible to the parents or guardians for an itemized state- 
ment of expenditures. This money may be deposited for safe keeping with 
the Treasurer, but in this case parents must state in writing a definite amount 
for weekly withdrawals by the student. No advance of money will ever be 
made at any time for any purpose whatever. In case of emergency, students 
should have money wired to them. 

If a student is withdrawn before the end of the semester, no deductions 
will be made. Should, however, a student leave on account of prolonged ill- 
ness, or be dismissed honorably, a deduction for board and room rental, but 
not for tuition and fees, will be made for the remainder of the semester, be- 
ginning with the first of the following month. The date on which notice is 
received by the Treasurer from the Registrar's Office is considered the date 
of withdrawal. 

No student may have an honorable dismissal nor will he be given credit 
for his studies or be admitted to the examination in January or May until 
all indebtedness to the College has been settled. 

Bulletin of Information Page Forty-one 



The College will not be responsible for books, clothing, jewelry or any 
other articles possessed by the student while in school or left by him at his 
departure. 

Refunds, when due, are made only to parents or guardians of the stu- 
dent, unless the College be instructed in writing by parent or guardian to 
make the refund to the student. 

PLAN OF PAYMENTS 

Although the general regulation calls for payment in two installments, 
the College offers the following alternative: Payment may be made in monthly 
installments in advance. An extra charge of $5.00 will be added, should par- 
ents or guardian elect to pay on the monthly plan. This charge will be made 
and is payable with the first monthly installment. 

Special arrangements for any other alternative plan of payments or pos- 
sible reduction in the case of brothers, must be made before the opening 
classes with the Treasurer. 



Page Forty -two Spring Hill College 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT AID 



scholarships 

Realizing the importance of substantial aid in the encourage- 
ment of deserving students, far-seeing friends of the College have 
■ rom time to time set aside funds for the establishment of scholar- 
ships. A perpetual scholarship is established by the gift of funds 
vhose interest will yield a sum sufficient to pay tuition at least in 
:c>art. To cover the entire yearly cost of tuition an endowment of 
$5,000 is required. An annual scholarship is provided by the yearly 
jionation of $250. 

The Little Flower Scholarship. This scholarship is worth $200 annually. 

The Saint Ignatus Scholarship. 

The Charles P. Miller Gold Star Scholarship, founded by his mother 
!.n memory of this member of the class of 1938, who gave his life for his 
country in World War II. 

The Bishop Toolen Scholarships, donated by the Most Reverend T. J. 
jloolen, D.D., Bishop of Mobile, carry remittance of tuition fees. 

The Prohaska Memorial Scholarships, founded by a bequest under the 
will of Frank Prohaska, of the class of 1913, for the establishment of scholar- 
ships for the benefit of students needing financial assistance. 

The American Legion- Veterans of Foreign Wars Memorial Scholar- 
ship. This scholarship is awarded by the Robert L. Bullard Post No. 49 of 
the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the Lamar Y. McLeod Post No. 3 of the 
American Legion to a graduate of the schools of Mobile County. This scholar- 
ship is a memorial to those Americans who made the supreme sacrifice in 
ithe defense of their country. 

The McGill Scholarship (formerly the Spring Hill High School Scholar- 
ship) is awarded annually to the graduate of McGill Institute, Mobile, who 
iwins the highest honors of his class. It carries remittance of tuition fees for 
the student's course. 

The Christian Brothers Scholarship is awarded under the same condi- 
tions as the preceding one to the honor graduate of Christian Brothers' Col- 
lege, Memphis, Tennessee. 

The Jesuit High School Scholarships are granted to the honor graduate 
[of each of the High Schools of the New Orleans Province of the Society of 
jjesus, namely, Jesuit High School of New Orleans, Jesuit High School of 
Dallas, Jesuit High School of Tampa, St. John's High School of Shreveport. 

^Bulletin of Information Page Forty -three 



Finally, a restricted number of Spring Hill College Scholarships wi 
be granted by the college annually. Applications for these scholarships mui 
be made to the Dean before August 1st. These scholarships are awarded o 
the basis of proven need and high academic standing. 

Self Aid 

A certain number of student assistantships and clerical position 
are open annually to deserving students. Students wishing to profi 
by such financial aid should apply to the Dean before May 15th 

Conditions of Tenure 

A student receiving assistance through scholarship or colleg 
employment is expected to maintain a scholastic standing which I 
the judgment of the college authorities given evidence that he i 
making the most of his abilities and opportunities. A mediocre 
though passing, record in any semester raises for consideration thj 
question of continuance of financial assistance. It is clear that th«! 
student receiving aid must be regular in attendance at his colleg 
exercises and also must maintain a record of good conduct. 

Gifts and Bequests 

As a private institution of higher learning, Spring Hill Collegj 
must look to its friends and benefactors and to all whose bounty 
is on occasion devoted to the cause of education for the generou: 
contributions which will enable the College to carry on its wori 
of education, to provide an increase in the aid to deserving students 
and to extend its contribution to the spread of knowledge and truth 
Gifts to the College may take the form of funds for the establish 
ment of scholarships or professorships, of additions to the materia 
equipment of library collections, of contributions to the general en- 
dowment fund, or may be undesignated. Those desiring to make 
a bequest to Spring Hill in their wills may be helped by the fol 
lowing suggested form: 

legal form for bequest 

/ give (devise) and bequeath to Spring Hill College, an institution incor- 
porated under the laws of the State of Alabama, and located at Spring Hill, 

Mobile County, Alabama, its successors forever, the sum of 

Dollars (or otherwise describe the gift) for its general corporate purpose (or 
name a particular corporate purpose). 



Page Forty -four Spring Hill College 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

The conditions to be satisfied in order that a baccalaureate de- 
gree be earned may be classified under the following headings. 

1. COURSE REQUIREMENT 

The required subjects for various degrees are as follows: 

Prescribed for the A.B. Degree 

Latin (12), Greek or Modern Languarge (6-12), English (12), Science (8), Mathe- 
matics (6), History (6), Religion (16), Logic (3), Metaphysics (6), Psychology (3), Ethics 
(6), History of Philosophy (2), Sociology (6), Public Speaking (2). 

Prescribed for the B.S. Degree (Natural Sciences) 

Biology (8) and Chemistry (8), or Chemistry (8) and Physics ('8), Mathematics (6), 
English (12), Modern Language (6-12), History (6), Logic (3), Metaphysics (6), Ethics 
(6), Psychology (3), Religion (16). 

Prescribed for the B.S. Degree (Social Sciences) 

Modern Language (6-12), English (12), Science or Mathematics (6), History (6), 
Political Science (6), Economics (6), Religion (16), Logic (3), Metaphysics (6), Ethics 
(6), Sociology (6), Public Speaking (2), Psychology (3). 

Prescribed for the B.S.C. Degree (Commerce) 

Mathematics (6), Business Law (6), English (12), History (6), Public Speaking (2), 
Religion (16), Logic (3), Metaphysics (6), Psychology (3), Ethics (6). 

2. QUANTITATIVE REQUIREMENT 

In order to qualify for a baccalaureate degree the student must present a 
program of studies consisting of not less than 132 semester hours of work, 
including the courses listed in the preceding section appropriate to the de- 
gree he seeks. 

3. QUALITATIVE REQUIREMENT 

A candidate for a degree must obtain not only the number of credits re- 
quired, but his work must reach a certain standard of excellence. In addition 
to the 132 hours credit necessary for graduation, each student must earn at 
least 132 quality points, or an average mark in all subjects of C or better. 
No student will be advanced to candidacy for any collegiate degree whose 
credit points do not equal his semester hours at the beginning of his last 
semester. 

4. LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT 

All candidates for academic degrees must pass satisfactorily a reading test 
in French, German or Spanish to be administered after they have completed 
the intermediate course. Furthermore, a test in proficiency in English is given 

Bulletin of Information Page Forty-jive 



to ali Sophomores; successful completion of this test by the beginning of the 
semester in which the student plans to graduate is a prerequisite to graduation 
for all candidates. 

5. CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENT 

There must be completed a major sequence in some subject (or at the 
discretion of the department concerned and with the approval of the Dean, 
in some closely related group of subjects) and a minor sequence in another 
subject. The uniform requirement for a major sequence in any department 
is a program of eighteen hours of upper division courses; for a minor se- 
quence, a program of twelve hours of upper division courses. A major may be 
changed only by the consent of the Dean and the heads of the departments 
concerned, and such changes will be permitted only upon the distinct under- 
standing that all the courses prescribed in the major finally chosen shall be 
completed before graduation. 

6. COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

At the end of his senior year the candidate for a degree must pass a com- 
prehensive examination on the various courses offered as a major. Candi- 
dates for honors at graduation (see below) must also present an acceptable 
thesis for the approval of the Dean. 

7. RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT 

The senior year (or 24 of the last 30 semester hours of work) must be 
made at Spring Hill College. 

8. GRADUATION FEE 

A graduation fee of fifteen dollars is payable in advance and a settlement 
of all indebtedness to the College must be made. 

All applicants for a degree must file their applications and present their 
credits and the evidence of having met all requirements listed above on or be- 
fore the first of April preceding commencement. 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

GRADUATION HONORS 

The honors at graduation to be inscribed on the diplomas, read at com- 
mencement and published in the lists of graduates are granted on the basis of 
quality points in their ratio to the total number of credit hours carried and 
are awarded according to the following scale: maxima cum laude for a quality 
quotient of 2.9; magna cum laude for a quality quotient of 2.7; cum laude 
for a quality quotient of 2.5. 



Page Forty-six Spring Hill College 



PRIZES AND TROPHIES 



To encourage the students of Spring Hill College in the de- 
velopment of initiative, self-reliance and leadership in various phases 
of college life the following prizes and trophies are awarded in 
recognition of outstanding achievement. In most instances the 
awards are made annually. 

The Joseph Block Memorial Medal for Music has been founded by the 
children of a former Professor of Music at the college; viz., Edward Block 
of New York; Alexander Block, Mrs. Bettie Haas, Mrs. Emma Eichold and 
Mrs. Francis B. Simon of Mobile. 

This medal was awarded to Stanley Wanueha. 

|The Bishop O'Sullivan Memorial Medal is awarded for excellence in Chris- 
|tian Doctrine and Ecclesiastical History. 

This medal was awarded to John Kager. 

The Hutchison Medal, founded by Miller Reese Hutchison is awarded to 
the writer of the best thesis in Philosophy. 
This medal was awarded to Joseph Degnan. 

The Merilh Medal for the best English essay was founded by Edmund H. 
Merilh, B.S., 1917. 

This medal was not awarded. 

The Walsh Memorial Medal was founded in memory of William A. Walsh, 
A.B., 1908, for excellence in Oratory. 

This medal was awarded to Milton Bronson. 

The O'Callaghan Medal, donated by Rev. }. McDermott, in memory of 
Rev. C. T. O'Callaghan, D.D., for the best paper in Latin. 
This medal was awarded to Biagino Marone. 

The Mastin Medal, founded by the former physician of the college, Dr. 
I William Mastin, is awarded for the best paper in General Chemistry. 
This medal was awarded to Charles J. Barter, Jr. 

The Stewart Medal is donated annually by Dr. Dudley M. Stewart, B.S., 
1923, for the best paper in Biology. 

This medal was awarded to J. L. Hubbard, Jr. 

Next in merit: Raymond Smith, Anthony Scotto. 

The Houssiere Medal, founded by Charles, Ernest and Jules Houssiere for 
excellence in mathematics. 

Bulletin of Information Page Forty-seven 



The Faulk Medal, donated by Ward C. Faulk for the highest honors of th 
Bachelor of Science in Commerce degree. 

This medal was awarded to Laurence Carroll McGinn. 

The Lange Medal, founded by Mrs. Louis A. Lange of New Orleans, 
awarded for excellence in Accounting. 

The Allen Medal, founded by the Most Reverend Edward P. Allen, forme 
Bishop of Mobile, is awarded by the votes of the students to the one excellin 
in deportment. 

This medal was awarded to Laurence Carroll McGinn. 

The Toolen Medal, founded by the Most Reverend Thomas J. Toolen, D.D, 
Bishop of Mobile, to be awarded to the graduate with the highest scholastic 
average for his four years of work. 

This medal was awarded to Ernest E. Phillips 

The Matt Rice Service Cup, founded by the Omicron Sigma Fraternity ii 
memory of Matthew P, Rice, A.B., 1919, a founder of the fraternity, i: 
awarded annually to the student, who during the year has rendered thtj 
greatest service to the college. 

This cup was awarded to Laurence Carroll McGinn. 

The Freshman Cup, founded in 1938 at the silver jubilee reunion of the classj 
of 1913 by the following members of the class: Father John J. Druhan, S.J.J 
President of the College, Dr. William Barker, Lee A. Plauche, Frank Pro 
haska, and William B. Slattery, is awarded annually to the Freshman show- 
ing greatest promise of future leadership. 
This cup was awarded to Walter Watts. 

Prize of $25 Security Bond, donated by Mobile Academy of Science to out- 
standing Science Student at Spring Hill College. 

This bond was awarded to William J. Bradley, HI. 

The Economics Medal is donated annually by Mrs. Ellen M. Betty for the 
best paper in Economics. 

This medal was not awarded. 

The Distinguished Student in Accountancy Award of the Alabama Society 
of Certified Public Accountants. 

This award was won by John E. Tait. 

The Alumni Summer Research Scholarship in Biology, founded by the 
Biology alumni in 1948. 

This scholarship was awarded to Earl G. Hamel. 

The Peter Canisius Award in Journalism, founded by Frank Bradley, B.S., 
1951, is awarded for outstanding work on student publications. 



Page Forty-eight Spring Hill College 






COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

/VND 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS 




DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



INTRODUCTORY NOTES 

The courses of instruction listed below are numbered according to a uni- 
fied plan. Lower division courses (usually taken by freshmen and sopho- 
mores) are numbered 1 to 99. Within the lower division numbers, the num- 
bers 30 to 99 frequently indicate that the course is reserved for sophomores. 
Upper division courses (usually taken by juniors and seniors and supposing 
previous preparation) are numbered from 100 to 199. Courses given in the 
first semestei are usually designated by an odd number and those given in 
the second semester by an even number. Double numbers (e.g. 141-142) fre- 
quently indicate that the first semester course is prerequisite for the second 
semester course and that both must be satisfactorily completed to obtain credit 
for either course. In most departments the courses are grouped into decades 
according to sequence, content, or some other plan of subdivision. 



KEY SYMBOL 

The following is a list of the key letters used to indicate the different 
departments of instruction: 



Accounting Ac 

Biology Bl 

Business Administration Ac 

Chemistry Ch 

Economics Ec 

Education Ed 

Engineering Eg 

English En 

French Fr 



German Gr 

Gree\ Gk 

History Hs 

Latin Lt 

Mathematics Mt 



Military Science and 

tactics 

Music Mu 

Philosophy Pi 



Physical Education Pc 

Physics Ph 

Political Science Po 

Psychology Ps 

Religion Rl 

Sociology So 

Ms Spanish Sp 

Speech Ex 



Of the courses listed below under the various department headings as 
many as may seem necessary will be given each term; the College, however, 
reserves the right to ma\e such changes or variations as circumstances require, 
including restriction of the number of students to be admitted to any course. 

BIOLOGY (Bi) 

To major in biology a student must include in his program Bl 191 and at least sixteen 
additional upper division hours in biology, as approved by the chairman of the department. 
Students who plan to major in biology should confer with the department chairman as soon 
as possible after this decision has been reached. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. General Zoology 

An elementary course consisting of a study of protoplasm and the cell, the taxonomy of the 

animal kingdom, the morphology and physiology of animal types, and of the principal facts 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Fifty-one 



of heredity and evolution. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

3. Genetics 

A Survey course of the facts and theories of heredity and variation. Lectures two hours 
per week. One semester. Two hours credit. 

4. Genetics Laboratory 

A practical course in methods of genetics investigation, Prerequisite: Accompanied by Bl 3. 
Two hours credit. 

5-6. Anatomy and Physiology 

A course intended primarily for nurses. It consists of lectures and demonstrations in gross 
human anatomy and physiology and of lectures and laboratory work in histology and em- 
bryology. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory two hours per week. Two semesters. 
Six hours credit. 

7. General Bacteriology 

This course is designed to make the student more familiar with the existence, char- 
acteristics and activities of micro-organisms, especially as they are related to nursing, with 
emphasis on cultural methods of studying bacteria; mocroscopic study of pathogenic bacteria 
and their relation to disease; history of mocrobiology; classification of bacteria; the mechan- 
ism of infection; immunity and immune substances. Lectures two hours per week; labora- 
tory two hours per week. One semester. Three hours credit. 

8. Botany 

An elementary study of the plant kingdom. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four 
hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

9. Zoology 

An elementary study of the animal kingdom. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four 
hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

II. Introductory Biology 

A general introduction to the science of life designed especially for those who wish only a 
cultural background in biology. The course can not be substituted for Bl 8-9 by majors 
in biology or for Bl 1-2 by pre-medical and pre-dental students. Lectures and demonstra- 
tions three hours per week. Three hours credit. 

31. Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates 

A comparative study of type forms with special reference to analogy and homology. Pre- 
requisite: Bl 1-2 or equivalent. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per 
week. Given every year. One semester. Four hours credit. 

41. Field Botany 

Collection and classification of specimens of major plant groups; work divided between 

field and laboratory. Prerequisite: Bl 8. Two hours credit. 

101. Advanced Genetics 

A study of problems in heredity and variation. Prequisites: Bl 1-2 or equivalent. Lectures 

two hours per week. One semester. Two hours credit. 

III. Mammalian Anatomy 

The anatomy of the cat. Prerequisite: Bl 31. Laboratory four hours per week. One semes- 
ter. Two hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

121. Histology 

A study of cells, tissues and organ structure. Prerequisite: Bl 1-2 or 8-9. Lectures two 

hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

Page Fifty-two Spring Hill College 



122. Vertebrate Embryology 

A study of gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation and later development of 
typical vertebrate forms. Prerequisite: Bl 1-2 or 8-9. Lectures two hours per week; labora- 
tory four hours per week. One semester. Four hoars credit. 

125. Special Problems in Biology 

Presentation of problems in biology which have philosophical significance. May be substi- 
tuted for Bl 191. Three lectures per week. Three hoars credit. 

150. Microscopic Technique 

A laboratory course in methods of preparing tissues for microscopic study. Prerequisite: Bl 

1-2 or 8-9. Time to be arranged. Two hoars credit. 

162. General Physiology 

The fundamental life processes of organisms from a general and comparative viewpoint. 
Prerequisites: Bl 1-2 or equivalent and Ch 140-145 or equivalent. Lectures two hours per 
week; laboratory four hours per week. One semester. Four hoars credit. 

191. History and Philosophy of Biology 

A discussion of the historical developments and philosophical implications of biology. Re- 
quired of all majors in biology; open to all seniors who have had a course in biology. 
Prerequisites: Bl 1-2 or equivalent and PI 33-34 and 100. Two hours per week for one 
semester. Two hours credit. 

199. Introduction to Research 

Special work for advanced students and preparation of thesis. Admission only with the 

approval of head of the department. Credits to be arranged. 

CHEMISTRY (Ch) 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. General Inorganic Chemistry 

A course dealing with the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry together with the 
systematic study of the elements. The laboratory experiments are designed to illustrate the 
matter of the course. Obligatory for all Freshmen B.S. Lectures two hours per week; 
laboratory four hours per week. Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

3. Hospital Chemistry 

An introductory survey for nurses, including principles of general chemistry, with special 

applications to nursing practice. Laboratory in blood and urine analysis. Three hours credit. 

11-12. Introductory Chemistry 

A general introduction to the science of chemistry designed to give the student a back- 
ground in this science. This course cannot be substituted for Ch 1-2 to qualify for advanced 
courses in chemistry. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory two hours per week. Two 
semesters. Six hours credit. 

31. Elementary Qualitative Analysis 

This course involves the theoretical and practical study of the principles underlying the 
isolation of the metallic and acid-forming elements. Obligatory for all Pre-Medical students 
and for all those majoring in chemistry. Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four 
hours per week. One semester. Four hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Fifty-three 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

131-132. Organic Chemistry 

The principles of organic chemistry and its relation to general chemistry are emphasized 
Typical organic compounds are studied. General reactions and characteristics are discussed; 
and many applications to practical life are given. Obligatory for all Pre-Medical students ana 
for those majoring in chemistry. Lectures three hours per week; laboratory four hours pel 
week. Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

135. Special Problems in Chemistry 

Presentation of problems in chemistry which have philosophical significance. Three lectures 

per week. First semester. Three hours credit. 

140. Elementary Physical Chemistry 

This course is designed for biology and Pre-Medical majors and does not require calculus. 

Three hours credit. 

141-142. Physical Chemistry I-U 

This course is intended to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles of chemical 
theory; the states and properties of matter, thermodynamics, thermochemistry, solutions, 
equilibrium, conductance, electromotive force, phase equilibria, surface chemistry, kinetics 
and photochemistry are discussed. Obligatory for chemistry majors. Prerequisites: Mt 3-4, 
101-101; Quantitative analysis, Elementary organic chemistry, Electricity and magnetism. 
Six hours credit. 

143-144. Physical Chemistry Laboratory 

This course is designed to teach exact measurements, under carefully controlled conditions, 
on chemical substances and processes, a determination of sources and magnitude of error, 
and also to give familiarity with the classical and current literature of the field. Obligatory 
for all chemistry majors. Prerequisites: Mt 3-4, 101-102; Elementary physics and Electricity 
and magnetism. Ch 141-142 may be taken concurrently. Four hours credit. 

145. Elementary Physical Chemistry Laboratory 

Experiments selected for the requirements of biology and Pre-Medical majors. Prerequisites: 
Quantitative analysis 153, Elementary organic chemistry, Physical chemistry. Ch 140 may 
be taken concurrently. One hour credit. 

153-154. Quantitative Analysis 

A more extended discussion of the theory and practice of volumetric and gravimetric 
methods, including an introduction to electroanalysis. Lecture two hours per week; labora- 
tory six hours per week. Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

161-162. Physiological Chemistry 

An elementary course dealing with the chemistry of the carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. 
The chemical basis underlying the phenomena of metabolism, enzymes, absorption and 
digestion are discussed. Lectures two hours per week. Two semesters. Four hours credit. 

163-164. Physiological Chemistry Laboratory 

A laboratory course to accompany 161-162. Four hours per week. Two semesters. Four 

hours credit. 

171. Qualitative Organic Analysis 

Purification and identification of organic compounds. Special emphasis is placed upon the 
practical analysis of compounds of organic origin. Lecture one hour per week; laboratory 
six hours. One semester. Three hours credit. 

172. Organic Preparations 

A one-semester course for seniors majoring in chemistry. Lecture one hour, laboratory six 
hours. Three hours credit. 

Page Fifty-four Spring Hill College 



181-182. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

A course for seniors majoring in chemistry. Prerequisite: Ch 141 and 142. Three periods 

of lecture per week. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

183-184. Inorganic Preparations 

A course for seniors majoring in chemistry. Two periods of laboratory per week. Two 

semesters. Four hours credit. 

199. Advanced Seminar 

For seniors majoring in chemistry. Credits to be arranged. 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 

The Greek and Latin languages are so related as the media of a unified ancient culture 
that it seems desirable for the student who majors in classical languages to have courses 
in both. It is possible, however, for a student to major in either one separately. Arrange- 
ment of a joint concentration must be made with the Chairman. In both Greek and Latin, 
courses numbered lower than 10 are for students who fail to present at least two high 
school units in the language. Prerequisite for any upper division course are three courses 
or their equivalent in high school units, and one year of lower division college work. In 
any degree program, eighteen semester hours must be upper division work. 

GREEK (Gk) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Elementary Gree\ 

Etymology and syntax with simple readings. Six hours credit. 

11-12, Intermediate Gree\ 

Review of grammar; readings from Xenophon. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101-102. Attic Orators 

Selections from Lysias, Isocrates, and Demosthenes. Six hours credit. 

131-132. Gree\ Drama 

A study of selected works of the masters of Greek tragedy. Six hours credit. 

141-142. Homer 

Selected passages from the Iliad or the Odyssey. Comparison with Virgil's Aenied. Six 
hours credit. 

181-182. A Study of the Gree\ Fathers 

Selected readings from Chrysostom and Basil and others. Six hours credit. 

LATIN (Lt) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Elementary Latin 

Etymology and syntax; simple readings. Six hours credit. 

3-4. Intermediate Latin 

Review of grammar; reading from Caesar. Six hours credit. 

11-12. Cicero 

Selected readings from Cicero's orations. Six hours credit. 
UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101-102. Roman Historians 

Selected readings from Sallust; Tacitus and Livy. Six hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Fifty-five 



103-104. Latin Lyric Poetry and Satire 
The Odes and Satires of Horace. Six hours credit. 

105-106. Roman Epic 

A study of Virgil's Aeneid. Six hours credit. 

131-132. Roman Philosophy 
Philosophical works of Cicero. Six hours credit. 

141-142. Patristic Latin 

Readings from Cyprian, Jerome, Ambrose, Augustine and other Latin Fathers. Six hours 

credit. 

COMMERCE 
ACCOUNTING (Ac) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

10. Introduction to Accounting 

A course in personal and professional accounting for non-commerce students; surveys the 
accounting field; includes some financial statement analysis. Not open to commerce students. 
Three hours credit. 

11-12. Elementary Principles of Accounting 

This is the basic course in accounting, stressing fundamentals, and providing practice in 
bookkeeping and accounting procedures. Required of commerce students. Six hours credit. 

21. Financial Statement Analysis 

The aim of this course is to train students to analyze and interpret financial statements for 

business control. Required of business administration and economics majors. Three hours 

credit. 

31-32. Intermediate Accounting 

A study of more advanced principles of accounting theory, including the study of the 
management viewpoint of accounting. Prerequisite: Ac 11-12. Required of accounting 
majors. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101-102. Advanced Accounting Problems 

Takes up advanced phases of accounting problems, including installment sales, partnership 
liquidations, consolidated statements, foreign exchange and fiduciary accounting. Prerequi- 
site: Ac 31-32. Required of all accounting majors. Six hours credit. 

131. Cost Accounting 

This is the first course in cost accounting. It includes a study of material, labor, and fac- 
tory burden accounting, process costs, etc. Prerequisite: Ac 31-32 and junior standing. 
Required of all accounting majors. Three hours credit. 

132. Advanced Cost Accounting 

Takes up more advanced topics of cost accounting and treats standard costs comprehensively. 
Prerequisites: Ac 31-32 and 131. Required of all accounting majors. Three hours credit. 

161-162. Income Tax Procedure 

Embraces a study of the Federal tax law. Emphasizes individual and partnership tax prob- 
lems during the first semester and corporation, gift, estate, reorganization and payroll tax 
problems during the second semester. Prerequisites: Ac 31-32 and junior standing. Re- 
quired of all accounting majors. Open to pre-law students as an elective. Six hours credit. 

Page Fifty-six Spring Hill College 



171-172. Elementary and Advanced Auditing 

This course covers theory and practice of auditing. Includes practice sets and supplemental 
readings. Prerequisites: Ac 101-102 and 131 (may be taken concurrently). Required of 
all accounting majors. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

181. Controllers hip 

The functions, duties, and responsibilities of the chief accounting officer in a public or 
private business enterprise are studied. Problems of office organization and management 
arc treated as well as integration of staff activities. Takes up the work of the internal 
auditors and the study of internal accounting procedures and control. Prerequisites: Ac 101- 
102, 131, 132. Elective for accounting majors. Three hours credit. 

184. Governmental Accounting 

In this course the student studies the special features of accounting for municipalities and 
other governmental units as well as institutional accounting. Prerequisites: Ac 101-102. 
Elective for accounting majors. Three hours credit. 

191. C.P.A. Examination Review 

Preparation for actual practice and Theory and Practice section of C.P.A. examination. 
Topics include preparation of statements, accounting theory, funds and reserves, partner- 
ships, corporations, consolidated statements, fiduciary accounting, governmental accounting, 
cost problems, etc. Usually offered through Evening Division on the basis of four 2V2 
hour meetings per week for six weeks preceding semi-annual examination dates. Offered 
on demand. Prerequisites: Senior standing, Ac 101-102, 131-132, 171. For accounting 
majors only. Four hours credit. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (Ba) 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Typing for Beginners 

Students learn keyboard control, improvement of speed and accuracy, and business letter 

writing. Offered only in the Evening Division. Four hours credit. 

3-4. Advanced Typing 

Emphasis on speed building through improvement of basic technique, special letter writing 
problems, special typing problems. Prerequisite: Ba 1-2. Offered only in the Evening Divi- 
sion. Four hours credit. 

5-6. Elementary Shorthand 

A study of the theory of Gregg shorthand, development of skill in reading and writing from 
printed shorthand and beginning dictation. Offered only in the Evening Division. Four- 
hours credit. 

7-8. Advanced Shorthand 

Rapid dictation and transcription training for secretarial positions in business and pro- 
fessional offices. Prerequisites: Ba 1-2, 5-6. Offered only in the Evening Divison. Four 
hours credit. 

11-12. Office Training 

Fundamentals of indexing, filing, etc., business psychology, handling of mail, specialized 

secretarial duties, etc. Offered only in the Evening Division. Four hours credit. 

21. Introduction to Business 

This is a survey course offered primarily for non-commerce students to acquaint them 
with general business practices and the different fields of business activity. Not open to 
commerce students. Three hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Fifty-seven 



31-32. Business Law 

A general course covering contracts, agency, corporation, negotiable instruments, sales, bail- 
ments and carriers, unfair competition. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

115. Corporation Finance 

A study of the problems of financial management of a business. Some of the topics con- 
sidered are: promotion, stocks, bonds, notes, accounts, source of fixed capital, distribution 
of earnings, expansion, reorganization. Three hours credit. 

117. Introduction to Industrial Management 

A survey course in management principles and methods. The student is given a compre- 
hensive view of modern practices of planning, organizing, and controlling various functional 
activities in business. Three hours credit. 

124. Investments 

A study of the nature and principles of investment with their application to the types of 

securities and an analysis of the channels of distribution. Three hours credit. 

132. Marketing 

A presentation of the fundamental principles and methods of marketing functions with an 
analysis of consumer buying habits and motives. Three hours credit. 

133. Retailing Problems 

A course including the intensive study of retail store management and operations. Buying 
operations, stock control and merchandise planning are also included. Open to merchan- 
dising seniors, others with permission of the instructor. Three hours credit. 

136. Purchasing 

The stud of the principles of purchasing and types of actual problems confronting a pur- 
chasing agent in the performance of his duties. Three hours credit. 

138. Credit Management 

This course includes the study of the work of the credit manager in the various types of 
marketing agencies, and credit from the mercantile credit manager's viewpoint. Three 
hours credit. 

143. Advertising 

A study of the practices and policies of advertising in the main type of advertising media. 
Three hours credit. 

144. Salesmanship 

The underlying economic and psychological laws which govern selling. Three hours credit. 

145. Sales Management 

A study of the following problems: product, market and distribution research, recruiting, 
selecting, contrasting, training and equipping salesmen, compensation plans, sales territories, 
quotas, sales promotion and sales policies. Three hours credit. 

147. Ban\ Administration 

This course deals with managerial problems of banks. Problems including organization, 
capital structure, earning power, supervision and regulation, examinations, call reports, and 
other regulatory matters are taken up. Open to Banking and Finance seniors, others with 
permission of the instructor. Three hours credit. 

152. Insurance 

The principles and practices underlying the more important types of industries as factors 

in private and business life. Three hours credit. 

Page Fifty-eight Spring Hill College 



161. Transportation 

A study of the economics of transportation and the preblems of operation, management and 
regulation of all important transport agencies. Three hours credit. 

174. Real Estate 

A course embracing a study of the economic, legal, and administrative principles of real 

property. Three hours credit. 

181. Time and Motion Study 

A course in the fundamentals of operation analysis, motion economy, time study, job stand- 
ards and industrial efficiency. Three hours credit. 

182. Manufacturing Industries 

A survey course in the technical factors and processes, peculiar business problems and 
economic characteristics of the leading manufacturing industries of the United States. Three 
hours credit. 

183. Industrial Management Problems 

This course includes a study of problems involving planning, layout, operation, administra- 
tion, wage incentive plans, industrial safety in the manufacturing plant; also included is a 
study of economic factors of production and the structure of industrial organization. Open 
to industrial management majors, others with permission of instructor. Three hours credit. 

186. Personnel Problems 

An analysis of the principles of selection, training, care, and administration of personnel, 
i considered in the light of current attempts to solve employer-employee differences. Three 
hours credit. 

192. Business Problems 

This course is designed to train the student to solve varied business problems by drawing 
en his survey courses and research in the business library and current periodicals. Required 
of all business administration majors. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Three hours credit. 

ECONOMICS (Ec) 



LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

31. Introduction to Economics 

:jA brief analysis of economic principles designed for non-economic majors. Three hours 
| credit. 

\35-36. Principles of Economics 

This course is intended to give a thorough explanation of the laws and principles under- 
lying the economic system. It embraces a detailed analysis ©f production, distribution, ex- 
change and consumption. A prerequisite for all upper division courses in economics. Six 
I \ hours credit. 

jUPPER DIVISION COURSES 

\106. Money and Banking 

Designed to give the students a firm grasp of the economic principles and theories under- 
lying money, and the functions and operation of investment, commercial, and central bank- 
ing. Three hours credit. 

107. Monetary Theory 

An elementary investigation of the leading contributions of classical and contemporary 

monetary theorists. Three hours credit. 

110. Economics of Public Finance 

! This course is directed to a practical knowledge of the principles and methods of govern- 
mental fiscal operations and policies. Three hours credit. 

iBulletin of Information Page Fifty -nine 



112. Land Economics 

A survey of the principles of land utilization and the major problems arising therefrom 

Three hours credit. 

122. Labor Economics 

Reviews social, economic, historical, and political factors significant to orientation in in 
dustrial relations; analysis of main phases of industrial conflict with proposed solution; 
Three hours credit. 

123. Labor Law 

Study of modern labor legislation which so deeply and so continuously affects the problem 
of industrial relations. Three hours credit. 

124. Industrial Relations 

This course is designed to give the student a practical demonstration of union-managemen 
relationships; the student is required to participate in actual bargaining conferences unde 
the guidance of representative union and management leaders. Three hours credit. 

126. Economic History of the United States 

The economy of colonial America; commerce, agriculture and finance after 1789; the in 
dustrial revolution; the westward movement; development of banking, transportation anc 
labor; rise of the corporation; growth of foreign trade; the United States as a world eco 
nomic power. Three hours credit. 

128. Statistics 

An introductory consideration of statistical theory; collection, presentation, analysis and in- 
terpretation of data; frequency distribution; time; measures of central tendency anc 
dispersion; index numbers; correlation; forecasting. Three hours credit. 

134. International Trade 

This course is designated to give the student a foundation in the theories and operation 
of international commercial policy and practice, foreign investment and foreign exchange, 
Three hours credit. 

138-139. Economic Analysis 

A two semester course in intermediate economics embracing studies in demand and supply. 

marginal analysis. Six hours credit. 

145. Business Cycles 
Economic organization in its relation to the business fluctuations; indexes of business con- 
ditions; timing duration and amplitudes of cycles; international aspects; the problems of 
forecasting and control. Three hours credit. 

153. History of Economic Thought 
An historical analysis of the development of Economic Theory. A study of the chief con- 
tributions of the Physiocrats, Adam Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, Say, Mill, Cairnes, Carey, 
Bastiat, Marx, Bohm-Bawerk, J. B. Clark, Marshall, and Veblen. Three hours credit. 

155. Contemporary Economic Problems 

The economic principles involved in the existing maladjustments will be considered in the 
light of current attempts to secure a solution. Three hours credit. 

156. Contemporary Economic Thought 

A survey of contemporary economic literature considering present school of economic 
thought, their points of difference and theoretical tendencies. Three hours credit. 

For information concerning Teacher Training the student is referred to the section of 
this Bulletin on Programs of Curricula. 

Page Sixty Spring Hill College 



EDUCATION (Ed) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

21. Introduction to Education 

An orientation course which surveys the field of education and of teacher training. Its 
objective is to provide the prospective teacher with an understanding of the personal and 
professional qualifications, relationships and responsibilities of the teacher. Three hours credit. 

31. History of Education 

A survey of educational theory, institutions and practice during ancient and modern times 
with special emphasis on the European system which influenced the more recent educa- 
tional movements in Europe and America. Three hours credit. 

32. History of Education in the U. S. 

This course begins with a study of the origin and development of the various school sys- 
tems, denominational and public, in the United States. Three hours credit. 

81. Philosophy of Education 

A study of the philosophical principals underlying the different systems of education with 
a special emphasis on the Jesuit system. Three hours credit. 

82. Educational Psychology 

The student is directed in the study of the laws of learning, the learning curve, the effi- 
ciency and permanence of learning, transfer of training, the result of exercise, the measure- 
ment of achievement, the use of tests, the new types of examinations. Three hours credit. 
UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

111. Principles of High School Teaching 

Among the topics considered are the aims in instruction; the class exercise; the essentials 
of good questioning; the modes of instruction; the importance of study; the prelection or 
assignment; the repetition or recitation; standards and measurements; the individual and 
social elements in secondary instruction. Three hours credit. 

112. Statistical Methods in Education 

The purpose of the course is to acquaint teachers and prospective teachers with those 
statistical techniques which are most important from the viewpoint of education. Three 
hours credit. 

135. Extra-Curricular Activities 

The purpose of this course is to instruct the students of education in the importance of 
student participation in school activities outside the classroom. Daily lecture and daily two- 
hour period of field work. Three hours credit. 

ISO. Co-operative Study of Secondary Schools 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the work accomplished by the Committee 
set up for the Co-operative Study of Secondary School Standards in order to establish the 
ground work for an appreciation and critical evaluation of the standards that should govern 
secondary schools. Three hours credit. 

161. Materials and Methods of Teaching English 

The organization of a balanced curriculum in English. Integration of High School English 

with college requirements. Three hours credit. 

166. Materials and Methods of Teaching History 

The object of this course is to give the student an intimate knowledge of the aim, methods, 

and contents of the history course in the high school. Three hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Sixty-one 



171. Materials and Methods of Teaching Science 
The course purports to evaluate the place of the natural sciences in the high school cur- 
riculum and study in survey the material that makes up the science courses along with the' 
methods best suited to achieve the aims of the science courses. Three hours credit. 

176. Materials and Methods of Teaching Language 

A study of the contents and modern methods of presentation of the various modern lan- 
guages as well as the classical languages. Special emphasis is laid on the more recent 
methods of teaching Spanish and French. Three hours credit. 

181. Materials and Methods of Teaching Mathematics 

Current trends and problems in the teaching of mathematics in secondary schools, methods 
of selecting and organizing teaching materials, effective teaching procedures, diagnostic and 
remedial techniques. Three hours credit. 

183. Materials and Methods of Teaching Commercial Subjects 
A study and evaluation of the contents of various commercial courses as found in different 
school systems; a survey of the more advanced methods in the presentation of commercial 
subjects; the place of the commercial subjects in the modern high school. Three hours credit. 

195-196. Observation and Practice Teaching 

Schedule to be arranged by each student individually with the chairman of the department of 
education. Candidates for degrees with a major in education must present a minimum of 
4 semester hours in observation and practice teaching with a minimum of 40 full periods of 
class teaching and 15 hours of observation. Four hours credits. 



ENGINEERING (Eg) 

The following courses, administered by the Department of Mathematics and Physics, 
are offered for students who wish to initiate their engineering training at Spring Hill. 

1. Introductory Geology 

A lecture course in the phenomena of dynamic and structural geology, illustrating external 
and internal geological agencies and processes with resulting land forms. Two hours credit. 

2. Surveying 

Theory, use and adjustment of instruments; methods of computation; some practical field 
work and topographic map-making. Three hours credit. 

3-4. Engineering Drawing 

Lettering, geometrical construction, orthographic projection, dimensions. Four hours credit. 

5. Descriptive Geometry 

Critical study of the science of drawing; location of points, lines and planes; single-curved 
surfaces; surfaces of revolution; tangent lines and planes; intersection of surfaces; shades 
and shadows; perspective. Prerequisite: Eg 3 and 4 and solid geometry. Three hours credit. 

7-8. Introductory Engineering Problems I-II 

Designed to determine the student's abilities, desires and shortcomings in work of an en- 
gineering nature, to aid the student in getting a better grasp of essential elementary mathe- 
matics, and to prepare him for handling better part of his first term of physics. Four hours 
credit. 

Page Sixty-two Spring Hill College 



ENGLISH (En) 

The student desiring to major in English must include in his program of studies En 
161 or 162 or 182 and at least 15 semester hours in other upper division courses, as ap- 
proved by the department chairman. No registration for upper division courses permitted 
until En 61-62 or 31-32 are completed. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

FG. Fundamental Grammar and Usage 

A course in the essentials of grammar and correct usage. Required of Freshmen and others 
who may be deficient in the theory or practice of correct English. A no-credit course but 
satisfactory work on the part of those taking it is prerequisite to any other English credit. 

1-2. Freshman Composition 

An intensive study of the various forms of composition, with frequent practice in writing 
and the reading and analysis of models. Required of all Freshmen, unless excused by special 
permission. Six hours credit. 

31. Types of Prose 

A literary study of the chief types of prose writing, narrative and expository with modern 
examples preferred. A substitute for freshmen composition in the case of superior entering 
students. Three hours credit. 

32. Poetry 

A course in the nature and elements of poetry, principles of versification. Reading, analysis 
and appreciation of selected poetry. Practice in verse writing. Three hours credit. 

33. Report Writing 

A study of the fundamentals of planning and writing special reports, particularly for busi- 
ness purposes; analysis of actual specimens for content, style and manner of presentation. 
Two lectures per week. Two hours credit. 

41. The Short Story 

The rise and development of this literary form. Extensive reading of great examples from 
world literature, with particular attention to the American short story. Analysis as well 
as composition required. Three hours credit. 

45. The Drama 

The theory of the drama will be studied and illustrated through historical examples, chiefly 
from English playwrights. Developments in play production will be studied as well as 
composition. Three hours credit. 

61. Survey of Early English Literature 

A study of the masterpieces and authors of English Literature in their historical and cultural 
setting from Beowulf through Neo-Classicism. Three hours credit. 

62. Survey of Later English Literature 

A study of the masterpieces and authors of English Literature in their historical and cultural 
setting from the Pre-Romantics through T. S. Eliot. Three hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

132. Shakespeare 

A study of the life, influence, sources of drama, and criticism of Shakespeare. Reading, 

analysis, and close study of six plays. Three hours credit. 

146. The Novel 

The principal purpose of this course is to study the technique of the novel, and the vari- 
ous schools of fiction. Reading of six selected novels, with special attention to literary and 
ethical critics. Three hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Sixty-three 



150. Aesthetics and Literary Criticism 

The philosophical basis of aesthetics, the elements of taste; theories of criticism; a surve; 
of criticay standards; a study of the schools of criticism, and of the work of the chief literary! 
critics. Three hours credit. 

154. Seventeenth Century Literature 

A study of Jonson and the Cavalier poets, Donne and the Metaphysical poets, and thij 

baroque prose writers. Three hours credit. 

161. Newman 

A study of three of the English Cardinal's great works; The Idea of a University, Thi. 
Present Position of Catholics in England and Apologia pro Vita Sua; detailed analysis o 
thought, and examination of literary merits. Three hours credit. 

162. Catholic Literary Revival 

A study of the chief figures in the modern literary resurgence stemming from Newmai 
and his movement. Special emphasis on Hopkins and Chesterton. Three hours credit. 

181. Milton 

A survey course of the life and work of Milton, with special emphasis on the longer poems 
Three hours credit. 

182. Chaucer 

A specialized study of the poet and of his works, with particular attention to the Canter- 
bury Tales. Three hours credit. 

184. The Period of Neo-Classicism 

The chief writers in England from the Restoration to the decline of Neo-Classicism with 
emphasis on Dryden, Pope, Swift, and Johnson. Three hours credit. 

185. Romantic Poets 

A specialized study of the five great omantic Poets; Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, 
and Shelly. Philosophy and literary theory of the period. Three hours credit. 

188. Victorian Poets 

The most important movements and figures in poetry during the Victorian period, with 

detailed study of Browning and Tennyson. Three hours credit. 

191. American Literature 

A rapid survey of the chief American poets and prose writers of the Nineteenth Century. 

Three hours credit. 

195. Modern Literature 

A careful examination of the best writers in English and America who have risen to promi- 
nence since World War I. Three hours credit. 

199. Special Study for Advanced Students 
Two hours credit. 

HISTORY (Hs) 

Twelve semester hours of lower division work are prerequisite to upper division 
courses in History. The prerequisite courses are Hs 1-2, 51-52. The departmental adviser 
will guide the selection of advanced courses after the prerequisites have been fulfilled. 
To major in this department the student must complete in his major field twelve hours 
of lower division work and eighteen hours of upper division, and in his minor field 
twelve hours of lower division and four courses on an upper division level. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Western Civilization 

A brief survey of the development of European civilization. Six hours credit. 

11-12. European History I-II 

A survey of Western civilization from Christian antiquity to 1648. Six hours credit. 

21-22. European History III-1V 

A continuation of Western civilization from 1648 to the present. Prerequisite: Sophomore 

standing. Six hours credit. 

Page Sixty-four Spring Hill College 



51-52. The Americas 

A survey of the Western Hemisphere in its aboriginal and colonial background and 
culture; and a brief history of the American nations since independence. Prerequisite: Hs 
1-2 and Sophomore standing. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101-102. Classical Civilization 

A study of the political, economic, social and cultural civilization of Ancient Greece and 

Rome to the death of Constantine the Great. Six hours credit. 

111-112. Medieval Europe 

A study of medieval civilization from the decline of the Roman Empire to the Renais- 
sance. Six hours credit. 

121. Renaissance and Reformation 

The cultural and religious evolution of the transition period (1300-1648) between medieval 
and modern history. Three hours credit. 

122. Era of Revolution 

The revolutionary movement in Europe and America in the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries. Three hours credit. 

123. The Nineteenth Century 

A century of capitalism, liberalism, nationalism, and secularism growing out of the 
Napoleonic era and extending into the twentieth century. Three hours credit. 

124. The Contemporary World 

I The two World Wars in their origin, progress and postwar problems. Three hours credit. 

1 131-132. English History 

\ A survey of English civilization from pre-historic times to the present. Six hours credit. 

133-134. English Constitutional History 

The Anglo-Saxon constitution, feudalism, Magna Charta, Common Law, parliamentary 
and cabinet systems, the rise of democracy, and English political theorists. Prerequisite: 
Hs 131-132. Six hours credit. 

1 141-142. American History 
A survey of United States history from colonial times to the present. Six hours credit. 

143-144. American Constitutional History 

The origin, content and development of the American Constitution and the major con- 
stitutional problems. Prerequisite: Hs 141-142. Six hours credit. 

145. American Diplomatic History 

A survey of United States foreign policy since 1778. Prerequisite: 141-142. Three hours 

credit. 

161-162. Latin American History 

A survey of the colonial and the national civilization of the Latin American countries. 

Six hours credit. 

181-182. Christian Civilization 
| A survey of ecclesiastical history from Apostolic times to the present. Six hours' credit. 

198. Special Study 

Credit and hours to be arranged by departmental adviser. 

I Bulletin of Information Page Sixty-five 



MATHEMATICS (Mt) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Fundamental Algebra 

This course is to be elected by students with deficient training. Offered annually in fall 
semesters and summer sessions. Three hours credit. 

2. Trigonometry 

Elements of plane trigonometry; this course together with the preceding will satisfy the 
minimum mathematics requirements for introductory science courses. Offered annually in 
Spring semesters and summer sessions. Three hours credit. 

3. Algebra and Trigonometry 

A course in algebra and trigonometry designed primarily for science majors and engi- 
neering students. Offered annually in fall semesters. Three hours credit. 

4. Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

A study of the usual topics of analytic geometry with an introduction to calculus. Offered 
annually in spring semesters and summer sessions. Three hours credit. 

NOTE. Courses Mt 3 and 4, or their substantial equivalent, are prerequisites for all upper 
division mathematics. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101-102. Calculus MI 

Differentiation of transcendental functions with applications; formulas, methods and appli- 
cations of integration; series; space coordinates and vectors; partial differentiation; multiple 
integration; applications. Offered annually. Six hours credit. 

121-122. Linear Algebra and Matrices 

An introduction to vector spaces, matrices and linear algebra. Offered annually. Six hours 

credit. 

131. Solid Analytic Geometry 

An exposition of the basic topics of solid analytic geometry coordinated with the theory of 
vectors and matrices. Offered annually in spring semesters. Three hours credit. 

132. College Geometry 

A study of modern concepts of pure geometry; designed particularly for the prospective 
high school teacher. Offered occasionally on demand. Three hours credit. 

151. Differential Equations 

An elementary treatment of ordinary differential equations; linear differential equations; 
and simultaneous systems; applications. Offered annually in fall semesters and summer 
sessions. Three hours credit. 

152. Vector Analysis 

An introduction to the algebra and calculus of vectors with some applications. Offered 
annually in spring semesters. Three hours credit. 

153. Applied Mathematics 

Special topics: Laplace transformation and Fourier methods; numerical solutions; boun- 
dary value problems. Offered occasionally on demand. Three hours credit. 

161-162. Advanced Calculus I-H 

An introductory study of fundamental theorems on continuous functions, differentiation, 
Integration, implicit functions, series and sequences, and special functions. Offered 
annually. Six hours credit. 

191-192. Mathematics Seminar 

Weekly meetings to discuss topics not covered by usual courses. Required for graduation 

with honors in mathematics. Offered annually. Two hours credit. 

Page Sixty-six Spring Hill College 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS (Ms) 

1-2. Basic Course I 

Fundamentals of military discipline, drill and exercise of command military organization; 
military policy of the United States; evolution of warfare; maps and aerial photographs; 
first aid and hygiene; individual weapons and rifle marksmanship; military problems 
of the United States. Two class periods and one drill period per week for two semesters. 
Two hours credit. 

3-4. Basic Course II 

Leadership, drill and exercise of command; and technique of the Transportation Corps 
which includes introduction to Transportation Corps; economics of military transportation; 
military highway transport and highway organization and operation. Two class periods 
and one drill period per week for two semesters. Two hours credit. 

5-6. Advanced Course I 

Leadership, drill and exercise of command; 120 hours of tactics and technique of Trans- 
portation Corps to include individual weapons and marksmanship. Four class periods and 
one drill period per week during two semesters and attendance at a summer camp for six 
weeks following the Junior Year. Six hours credit. 

7-8. Advanced Course II 

Leadership, drill and exercise of command; military administration; military law; mili- 
tary teaching methods; psychological warfare; geographical foundations of national power; 
and 80 hours of Transportation Corps branch tactics and technique. Four class periods 
and one drill period per week for two semesters. Six hours credit. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

The courses of the Department are in the French, German, and Spanish languages. The 
nature of the courses and their content are such as to secure the following sequence of 
objectives; a) A reading knowledge sufficient to fulfill the lower division objective in the 
field of modern language; b) A mastery of grammar and syntax, and an acquaintance with 
the elements of style as an immediate preparation for the study of literature. This objective 
will also include an ability to converse with correct pronunciation and natural inflexion; 
c) A knowledge and appreciation of the literature of the language d) an acquaintance with 
the history and culture of the people from which the language comes. 

Two years of lower division work or the equivalent will be required as a prerequisite 
to upper division courses. Majors and other students who take upper division courses in 
the Department of Modern Languages will be advised in the selection of courses by the 
Chairman. 

FRENCH (Fr) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Elementary French 

Parts of speech, numerals. Conjugations of regular verbs and of the more common irregular 
verbs. Irregular verbs; use of moods and tenses; government of verbs; order of words in 
the sentence. Frequent themes. Six hours credit. 

31-32. Intermediate French 

Review of syntax, prose composition, reading of graduated texts; Daudet, de Maupassant, 

Coppee, Bourget. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101. Conversational French 

A course designed to promote facility in conversational use of French. Three hours credit. 

111-112. Survey of French Literature I - II 

An anthology study of chief literary masterpieces in chronological order. Six hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Sixty-seven 



131-132. The French Novel 

A detailed study of different types of the French novel; Classical, Romantic, Realistic and 

Contemporary, with reference to theme, characters, treatment, and style. Three hours credit. 

141. The French Drama 

A study of the technique of the French drama. Special stress will be laid on the classical 
tragedy, Racine and Corncille. Three hours credit. 

142. The French Comedy 

A reading course with special attention to the works of Moliere. Three hours credit. 
153. Lyric Poets of the Nineteenth Century 

A specialized study of the Romantic movement as illustrated in the poetry of Hugo, Musset, 
Vigney and Lamartine. Three hours credit. 

181. The Catholic Renaissance 

Study of the growing influence of Catholic religious thought in the prose and poetry of 

modern France, up to and including Claudel and Maritain. Three hours credit. 

199. Seminar for Advanced Students 

Special readings for advanced training. Three hours credit. 

GERMAN (Gr) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Elementary German 

A systematically progressive course designed to give the student facility in reading simple 

German. Elements in phonetics and grammar. Six hours credit. 

31-32. Intermediate German 

This study is based on comprehensive readings of modern prose with special emphasis on 

vocabulary building, idioms, and grammar review. Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

111-112. Advanced German 

Advanced composition. Survey of the history of German literature. Six hours credit. 
124. Scientific German 

Course is designed to give facility in reading periodicals in German. Three hours credit. 
131-132. German Drama 

Technique of the drama in German, with special study of Goethe and Schiller. Two semes- 
ters. Six hours credit. 

141-142. The German Novel 

A reading course in the modern novel. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

SPANISH (Sp) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Elementary Spanish 

Phonetics; pronunciation, accentuation, punctuation, capitalization. Rules governing nouns, 
adjectives and pronouns. Regular verbs, auxiliary verbs: ser, estar, habcr. Reading and 
drill in easy conversation. Study of irregular verbs, reflexive verbs, orthographic changing 
verbs. The subjunctive in independent and subordinate clauses. Reading and translation 
of easy stories. Six hours credit. 

31-32. Intermediate Spanish 

An introduction to Spanish prose, reading, a review of basic rules of grammar. 

Vocabulary building, Spanish word order, idiomatic expressions, reading aids, key words. 

Six hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101. Conversational Spanish 

A course designed to promote facility in conversational use of Spanish. Three hours credit. 

Page Sixty-eight Spring Hill College 



111. Spanish History 

1 The fascinating story of a country that has colonized half of the Western World, and at 
I one time or another has held dominion over more than half of the present territory of 
I the United States. An introduction to Spanish literature and civilization. Three hours credit. 

112. Don Quijote 

| The life and works of Cervantes, with special stress on Don Quijote, the supreme master- 
I piece of Spanish literature. A study of the content of the story, character portrayals, humor, 
style. Three hours credit. 

121-122. Survey of Spanish Literature III 

A study of the chief literary masterpieces. Six hours credit. 

131. The Golden Age 

The period of literature covering the last part of the Fifteenth Century, and extending to 
the end of the Seventeenth Century, the period in which Spanish culture attains its highest 
development. Three hours credit. 

132. Advanced Composition 

Study of Spanish models with a view to composition in imitation. Reading magazines and 
newspapers. Three hours credit. 

134. Nineteenth Century Spanish Literature 

A study of the chief literary masterpieces of this period. Three hours credit. 

MUSIC (Mu) 

Courses in music are administered by the Department of English. The objectives of the 
music program are (a) to provide the instruction necessary for understanding and appre- 
ciating music as a fine art; (b) to present music as a means of broadening and enriching 
cultural life; (c) to stimulate interest in the sacred music of the Catholic Church and to 
disseminate fuller knowledge and appreciation of it; (d) to provide opportunities for par- 
ticipation in various musical organizations. 

The College offers no major in music nor the extensive training necessary for full 
professional musicianship. However, courses are offered in theoretical and applied music, 
both instrumental and vocal, as electives towards an academic degree. Students may select 
music as a minor with the approval of the Dean. For a minor eighteen hours are required, 
at least eight of which must be in Theory. In Applied Music a minimum of six hours credit 
must be gained from courses taught by private lessons in instrument or voice. A maximum 
of four hours credit will be given for satisfactory ensemble work in Applied Music, pro- 
vided the student is registered at the same time in a course in Theory. Approval by the 
instructor is required for admission into any course in music. Choir members must be 
registered in the course in Liturgical Music to gain credit for their ensemble work. Private 
lessons are taught either for one hour or two half hour periods a week. Beginners may 
take private lessons, but not for credit. Instruments other than piano and organ must be 
furnished by the student. 

I THEORY 

1-2. Elementary Harmony 

An integrated study of the harmonic basis of music. Emphasis on analytical harmony 

from perspective of hearing and understanding rather than of composing. Four hours credit. 

3-4. Appreciation of Music 

A study of the elements necessary for intellectual enjoyment and appreciation of music. 
Principles of melody, rhythm, harmony, and tone color. Study of structure and forms. 
Symphonies, operas, and concertos analyzed and explained. Recordings played in the Music 
room two hours a week. One hour of lecture. Four hours credit. 

5. History of Music 

A survey of the development of music from ancient to modern times with special emphasis 

on the Classical and Romantic schools. Two hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Sixty-nine 



6. Gregorian Chant \ i 

The theory of Gregorian chant or plainsong. Neums, modes, chironomy. Syllabic and ' 

melismatic chants. Psalmody. Recordings studied. Practical vocal study of important chants. f 
Two hours credit. 

151-152. Liturgical Music \ > 

The traditions and ideals of the sacred music of the Catholic Church. The aesthetics of 
sacred music as presented in the Motu Proprio of Pius X and in other ecclesiastical legis- 
lation. Evaluation of Gregorian, polyphonic, and modern music. Study of the recording by 
the Solesmes monks and the Sistine choir. Required of all choral students to gain credit 
in choir section of ensemble music. Four hours credit. 

II APPLIED MUSIC 
A. Private Lessons 

11-12. Intermediate Piano 

Weekly private lessons. Four hours credit. 

15-16. Voice 

Weekly private lessons. Four hours credit. 

25-26. String or Wind Instruments 
Weekly private lessons. Four hours credit. 
111-112. Advanced Piano 
Weekly private lessons. Four hours credit. 
115-116. Advanced Vocal Studies 
Weekly private lessons. Four hours credit. 

B. Ensemble 

17-18. Glee Club 

Group work. One hour credit. 

19-20. Choir 

Group work. One hour credit. 

27-28. Band 

Group work. One hour credit. 

29-30. Orchestra 

Group work. One hour credit. 

PHILOSOPHY (PI) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

I. Introduction to Scholasticism 

The sources of the scholastic system; relation of philosophy to science and to faith; prin- 
cipal tenets of scholasticism. One hour credit. 

II. Dialectics 

The laws of thought; idea and the term; judgment and the proposition; reasoning and the 
syllogism; fallacies; methodology. Two hours credit. 

30. Epistemology 

A specialized study of the truth of thought, skepticism, methodic doubt; the criteria of 
certitude, and the problem of error. Four hours credit. 

31. Logic and Critics 

A rapid survey of dialectics, with exercises in reasoning, followed by a study of the truth 
of thought, the sources of cognition, and the criteria of certitude. Three hours credit. 

Page Seventy Spring Hill College 



32. General Metaphysics 

A rapid survey of chief theses in ontology and cosmology, particularly as they affect the 

philosophy of science. Three hours credit. 

33-34. Cosmology 

A specialized study of the properties of bodies; extension, inertia, activity; the laws of 
nature, possibility of miracles; the ultimate constitution of bodies. Metaphysical nature and 
properties of quality, motion, time and space. Six hours credit. 

35. Ontology 

A specialized study of being, its primary determinations and transcendental attributes; the 
various concepts of substance and accident. Individuality and personality; relation and 
cause. Four hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100. Sense Psychology 

A study of sense perception, imagination, memory; the sensuous appetite, movement, and 
feeling. Three hours credit. 

101. Rational Psychology 

The study of phenomena of rational life, intellectual concepts, rational appetency, free will, 
and determination. Origin, nature and destiny of the human soul. Three hours credit. 

131. Psychology ll 

The human intellect and its proper object; its spirituality proved by its acts; origin of ideas; 
innate ideas. Empiricism and Ontologism rejected; the human will and its formal object; 
its freedom, its control of the other faculties; nature of the human soul; a substantial 
principle, simple, spiritual, immortal, is union with the body; its origin; the unity and 
antiquity of the human race. Three hours credit. 

140-141. Natural Theology 

A specialized study of the proofs for God's existence and of the extent of our human 

knowledge of God's essence and attributes. Six hours credit. 

142. Special Metaphysics (Theodicy) 

Proofs for the existence of God; the validity of human knowledge about the divine nature; 
God's infinity, simplicity, uniqueness, immutability, eternity, immensity and omnipresence; 
the operative attributes, intellect and will, creation; providence and the problem of evil. 
Three hours credit. 

161. History of Ancient Philosophy 

A rapid survey of philosophy in the West from Thales to Plotinus, together with a much 
more detailed study of the leading figures of ancient philosophy, namely, Plato and Aris- 
totle, and of their contributions to the "Great Tradition." Two hours credit. 

162. History of Modern Philosophy 

A study of the leading philosophers and main currents of European philosophy from 
Descartes to present-day Existentialists, and a critical comparison of the key positions of 
the more important modern philosophies with those of Scholasticism. Two hours credit. 

180. Ethics for Nurses 

General principles of ethics; duties to self and to fellow man; family obligations; profes- 
sional obligations; obligations to civil authority; religion and morality. Three hours credit. 

181. General Ethics 

The ultimate end of man; the existence of objective morality; constituents of the moral 
order; eternal and natural law; nature of obligation. Three hours credit. 

182. Special Ethics 

Particular rights and duties; duty of natural religion, of self-preservation, of veracity; the 
right of self-defense; of property; the social relations of man; conjugal society; civil 
society; state and education; international law. Three hours credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Seventy-one 



191. Philosophy of the Non-living World 

A course in the problems of cosmology: the nature of quantity, space, qualitative change, 
motion, time; the hylomorphic constitution of corporeal substance. Two hours credit. 

192. Kant's Critical Philosophy 

An analysis of the philosophical doctrine of Immanuel Kant, particularly of his Critique 
of Pure Reason, its origins, its influence, its errors. Two hours credit. 

193. Philosophy of Beauty 

This course aims at giving the student basic aesthetic notions and principles necessary for 
the setting up of satisfactory norms for the judging of beauty in nature and especially in 
art; particular attention will be devoted to the philosophical foundations of literary criticism. 
Two hours credit. 

194. Philosophy and Life 

An integration course designed to round off the student's work in philosophy; it will con- 
sist largely in a re-consideration, at a deeper level, of certain basic philosophical theses; 
special care will be taken to show their unifying influence in thought, as well as their 
repercussions on action. Prerequisites: PI 131 and 142. Two hours credit. 

197. Texts of Saint Thomas 

A course in the background and interpretation of selected texts of St. Thomas. Two hours 
credit. 

198. Texts of Aristotle 

A course in the background and interpretation of selected texts of Aristotle. Two hours 
credit. 

199. Seminar for Advanced Students 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Pe) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Freshman Physical Education 

Freshmen (non-veterans) must participate in organized gymnasium activities. Competition 

on varsity level will suffice. One hour credit. 

5. First Aid 

Course in the teaching of safety and of useful emergency techniques. One hour credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

For Juniors and Seniors who are in Teacher-training Work. 

103. Introduction to Physical Education 

Brief discussion of purposes and aims of education, in particular of physical education; intro- 
duction to physical education. Three hours credit. 

104. Health and Safety Education 

Individual health and safety; fundamental techniques. Three hours credit. 

10.5. Principles, Organization and Administration of Secondary School 

Physical Education Program 
A discussion of proper programs for high schools, and of the administration of interscho- 
lastic and intramural athletics and a physical education program. Three hours credit. 

106. Principles and Practice of Coaching 

Instruction in coaching of football, basketball and baseball with practical experience in 
coaching grammar school teams. Three hours credit. 

107. Theory and Practice of Physical Education 

This course includes playing of varsity basketball or baseball; may be taken twice. Three 
hours credit. 

Page Seventy-two Spring Hill College 



PHYSICS (Ph) 

To satisfy the requirements for a major in Physics the student must complete 15 
hours of lecture courses on an upper division level and at least three hours of laboratory 
work including Ph 133-134. Mt 101-102 is a prerequisite for upper division courses in 

physics. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. General Physics I -I I 

Introduction to the essentials of classical physics including laboratory work. Prerequisites: 
Mt 1-2 or their equivalent (concurrent registration not permitted). Offered annually. Eight 
hours credit. 

11. Introductory Physics 

Survey of classical physics including some laboratory work to give the student a general 

background in this science. Offered in summer sessions only. Four hours credit. 

71-72. Mechanics 

Introduction to mechanics for engineering students and physical science majors. Prerequisite: 

Registration in Mt 101 or equivalent. Offered annually. Four hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

100. Special Problems in Physics 

Presentation of physical problems which have philosophical significance. Offered annually. 

Three hours credit. 

131-132. Electricity and Magnetism III 

Treatment on intermediate level of electrical properties and electromagnetism. This course 

must be accompanied by Ph 133-134i. Offered annually. Six hours credit. 

133-134. Electrical measurements 1-11 

An advanced student laboratory in electrical measurements. Offered annually. Two hours 

credit. 

141. Optics 

Introduction to topics in physical optics. This course must be accompanied by Ph 151. 
Offered in fall semesters of odd years. Three hours credit. 

142. Introduction to modern physics 

Introduction to fundamental theories of modern physics. This course must be accompanied 
by Ph 152. Offered in spring semesters of odd years. Three hours credit. 

143. Heat 

Treatment on intermediate level of problems in heat and elementary thermodynamics. 
This course must be accompanied by Ph 153. Offered in fall semesters of even years. Three 
hours credit. 

144. Wave motion and sound 

An introduction to problems of wave motion and sound. This course must be accompanied 
by Ph 154. Offered in spring semesters of even years. Three hours credit. 

145. Electronics 

A study of the fundamental theory of electronics and basic electronic apparatus. This 
course must be accompanied by Ph 155. Offered occasionally on adequate demand. Three 
hours credit. 

151. Light measurements 

An advanced laboratory in optical and spectroscopic measurements. Offered in fall semes- 
ters of odd years. One hour credit. 

152. Laboratory in modem physics 

A study of phenomena in modern physics. Offered in spring semesters of odd years. One 
hour credit. 

Bulletin of Information Page Seventy-three 



153. Heat measurements 

An advanced laboratory in heat and temperature measurements. Offered in fall semesters 
of odd years. One hour credit. 

154. Sound laboratory 

A study cf phenomena in sound and acoustics. Offered spring semesters of even years. 
One hour credit. 

155. Electronic measurements 

A laboratory study of electronic apparatus. Offered occasionally on adequate demand. 
One hour credit. 

161-162. Theoretical physics 

An advanced mathematical study of certain problems in mechanics and electricity. Offered 

annually. Three hours credit. 

191-192. Physics Seminar 

Weekly meetings to discuss portions of classical treatises in the development of physics. 

Required for graduation with honors in physics. Offered annually. Two hours credit. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE (Po) 

Courses in this field are administered by the Department of History and Social 
Sciences. Twelve semester hours of lower division work are prerequisite to upper divi- 
sion courses in Political Science. The prerequisite courses are Po 1-2, 11-12. The depart- 
mental adviser will guide the selection of advanced courses after the prerequisitions have 
been fulfilled. To major in Political Science the student must complete in his major 
field twelve hours of lower division work and eighteen hours of upper division, and 
in his minor field twelve hours of lower division and four courses on upper division level. 

The following courses are acceptable toward fulfilling the requirements of a major 
in Political Science: Ec 110: Economics of Public Finance; Hs 133-134: English Con- 
stitutional History; Hs 143-144: American Constitutional History; Hs 145: American 
Diplomatic History. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Survey of Government 

A survey of American and of comparative governments. Six hours credit. 

11. Principles of Political Science 

The nature, organization, function and international position of the state; the basic 
principles of constitutionalism and totalitarianism. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and 
Po 1-2. Three hours credit. 

12. Democratic Institutions 

The evolution of democratic social and political institutions and their diffusion, character- 
istics and problems. Prerequisite: Po 11. Three hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

121. Public Administration 

The principle, structure, organization and problems of public service, and the relation 

of government to economic and social agencies. Three hours credit. 

181-182. History of Political Thought 

A development of the world's foremost political philosophers from Plato to the present. 

Six hours credit. 

198. Special Study 

Credit and hours to be arranged by the departmental adviser. 

PSYCHOLOGY (Ps) 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

131. General Psychology 

The normal functioning of the mind. Proper object of the intellect. Origin of ideas. Nature 

and relationship of the various faculties of the soul. Three hours credit. 

Page Seventy-four Spring Hill College 



134. Experimental Psychology 

The methods and typical results of the experimental psychology of sensation, perception, 
emotion, memory, imagination, habit, thought, volition, the relation of consciousness to its 
object. Four hours credit. 

142. Abnormal Psychology 

Relation of the abnormal to normal in psychology. Present-day conception of mental dis- 
orders. The chief types. Remote causes; unherited emotional instability, environment. Proxi- 
mate or precipitating causes. Detailed study of examples of major classifications. Treat- 
ment. Three hours credit. 

RELIGION (Rl) 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

31-32. Christian Apologetics 

Revelation and the Church of Christ. The study of Christianity as a revealed religion. 
Divine institution of the Church. Marks of the Church. Its end and constitution. Required 
of all Catholic Freshmen. Two semesters. Four hours credit. 

61. Moral Guidance 

The Catholic Theory of Morality. The Fundamental obligations of the Christian. Detailed 
study of the first three commandments with application to practical cases. One semester. 
Required of all Catholic Sophomores. Two hours credit. 

62. The Commandments 

A detailed study of the last seven commandments and the precepts of the Church. A 
special consideration of the duties and obligations peculiar to the various professions. One 
semester. Required of Catholic Sophomores. Two hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

131-132. Catholic Dogma 

The nature of God; creation and elevation of man; Original sin; the Incarnation; the Re- 
demption. Special emphasis is given to the Scriptural texts that illustrate these truths. Two 
semesters. Required of all Catholic Juniors. Four hours credit. 

141. The Sacraments 

An advanced study of the meaning and value of the Catholic Sacramental System. A de- 
tailed study of the first six Sacraments and their place in the Catholic laymen's spiritual 
life. One semester. Required of all Catholic Seniors. Two hours credit. 

142. Christian Marriage 

Catholic doctrine on the morality of sex. The Sacrament of Matrimony. Premarital chastity. 
Prenuptial requirements. Rights, duties and graces of married couples. One semester. 
Required of all Catholic Seniors. Two hours credit. 

j 150. Christian Life and Worship 

I An advanced study of the Catholic liturgy. The Grace-life at work in true Christian wor- 

i) ship. One semester. Two hours credit. 

Special Courses for Non-Catholic Students 

I LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1 13-14. Comparative Religion 

| Definition and division of religions. A general history of the world's great religions with 
i'I stress on the common factors and characteristic differences. Required of non-Catholic Fresh- 
^ men and Sophomores. Given odd years. Four hours credit. 

] 33-34. Biblical Criticism 

I The notion of inspiration. Application to the Books of the New Testament. Method and 
\ spirit of higher criticism. Historical value of the New Testament. Difficulties answered. 
I Requred of non-Catholic Freshmen and Sophomores. Given even years. Four hours credit. 

I Bulletin of Information Page Seventy-five 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

137-138. Catholic Beliefs 

A course designed to give the student an intelligent understanding of and acquaintanc 
with characteristic points of Catholic teaching and practice. Required of non-Catholic Jun 
iors and Seniors. Given odd years. Four hours credit. 

143-144. Christian Morals 

The obligation of morality; basis in reason and aids from faith; practical application. 
Required of non-Catholic Juniors and Seniors. Given even years. Four hours credit. 



SOCIOLOGY (So) 



The courses listed below are administered through the Department of History aiu 
Social Sciences. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1. Introductory Sociology 

An analytical study of the structure of society; primary and secondary communities anc 
associations; temporary formations; social process; social stability and social change. Thret 
hours credit. 

2. Social Problems and Agencies 

A study of some of the more important social problems; the agencies of control; solution 
to problems in conformity with sound sociological principles. Three hours credit. 

21. Introduction to Public Health 

A survey course on the development of the science of public health, including the principle, 
of sanitation and communicable disease control, public health organization and administra 
tion; the relation of personal hygiene to public health. Primarily a course for nurses. Thretl 
hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

115. Culture History 

A study of the beginning and development of culture, especially among extant primitive 

people. Two hours credit. 

121. Social Case Wor\ 

A study of the philosophy, methods, processes and ethical aspects of case work. Three 

hours credit. 

131. Social History: Social Origins 
A study of primitive societal institutions, domestic, economic, political and religious. Thret^ 
hours credit. 

132. Social History: History of Social Wor\ 

A stud of the historical development of social work from Grecian and Roman practice 
to modern era. Three hours credit. 

141. Social Problems: Communism 

A critical study of Russia's strategy and tactics from the Bolshevik Revolution to the 

present. Three hours credit. 

143. Christian Social Order 

A study of the ideal social order as delineated in the Papal Enclyclicals, Rerum No varum 
and Quadragesimo Anno. Rejection of the opposite extremes of collectivism and rugged 
individualism. Three hours credit. 

151. The Family 

A study of the bonds of membership, interaction, functions, coordination of family; changes 
and variations in families; the integration and disintegration of family life; the extra- 
familial influences on family. Three hours credit. 

152. The State and International Relations 

Various theories regarding the origin of civil authority and the state; the various types of 
states; the functions of the state; the coordinating bodies within the state; international 
society; war and means of promoting peace. Three hours credit. 

Page Seventy-six Spring Hill College 



153. Social Problems: Crime and Delinquency 

A study of the extent, causes and cures of crime, the agencies of the police system; institu- 
tions of correction. Three hours credit. 

SPEECH (Ex) 

The courses in speech are administered by the Department of English. No speech course, 
however, will be accepted in the Department of English as a substitute for any English 
course. A minor in speech is permitted. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Basic Principles of Speech 

A study of the basic principles of speech; platform manner; voice control; qualities of a 

good speech; factors of attention; ends of speech; wording the speech; delivery. Four hours 

Credit. 

3. Types of Speech 

The speech to entertain; to inform; to impress; to convince; to stimulate; to persuade; to 
actuate. Three hours credit. 

4. Occasional Address 

After-dinner speaking; speeches of courtesy; speeches of acceptance; delivery of reports; 
presenting ideas. Three hours credit. 

5. Classroom Speech 

This course is intended for those training to become teachers. A study of the teacher's 
speech problem; the vocal mechanism; a study of language; speech pathology; the art of 
speaking. Three hours credit. 

6. Business Speech 

A course planned for students in the department of commerce, with emphasis on the short 
business report. Three hours credit. 

10. Parliamentary Law 

Study and application of Robert's Rules of Order. Two hours credit. 

31. Debating and Argumentation 

The principles of debating; propositions; briefing; logical reasoning; fallacies; refutation. 
Two hours credit. 

32. Principles of Discussion 

Principles of group discussion; panels; forums; formal and informal discussion. Three hours 
credit. 

33. Extemporaneous Speaking 

The art of extemporaneous speaking; essentials of speaking without preparation. Three 
hours credit. 

34. Radio Speaking 

The occasional radio address; emphasis on the difference between speaking before a visible 
audience and a mike. Three hours credit. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

101. Advanced Debating and Discussion 

Emphasis on actual debating and discussion. Study of the world's great debates and dis- 
cussions. Three hours credit. 

103. Advanced Radio Speaking 

Newscasts; spot-commercials; live-talent shows; transcribed and recorded programs; special 

events. Three hours credit. 

105. Dramatic Readings 

Oral interpretation of the printed word; short plays; readings. Three hours credit. 



Bulletin of Information Page Seventy-seven 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



May 23, 1950 



Doctor of Education 

(honoris causa) 
Frank Keeler 

Bachelor of Science 



Carlos Cartaya Escalante Ernest Charles Ferlita 

cum laude 



May 29, 1951 

Doctor of Education 

(honoris causa) 
J. Herbert Littlefield 

Doctor of Commercial Science in Transportation 

(honoris causa) 
Norman G. Nicolson 

Bachelor of Arts 

John K. Bingham, S.J. William E. Logan, Jr. 

Joseph J. Buchanan, Jr. Neil F. Magee 

Bryan E. Clark, William J. Malloy, Jr. 

cum laude Walter Engene Mobley, Jr. 

Malcolm Geohegan Ernest Earl Phillips 

David Joseph Littlefield Magna cum laude 
cum laude 

Page Seventy-eight Spring Hill College 



Bachelor of Science 



John Thomas Amorosi 

John Thomas Berte, S.J. 

Paul Theodore Bishop 

cum laude 

Brother Ernest Boucher, S.C. 

Frank Walsh Bradley 

William Joseph Bradley, III 

John Russell Brown, Jr. 

James P. Browning 

James Anthony Carrazza, Jr. 

Leslie Denis Cassidy, Jr. 

Thomas Patrick Conmay 

Francis Ardle Connolly 

Paul David Cratin 

Felix F. Darby, Jr. 

Martin DeMouy 

Nunziato Rocco DiBona 

Fred White Edmiston 

Brother Bosco Faget, S.C. 

Hacker J. Fagot, S.J. 

Frank George Garbin 

Joseph F. Giglio, III 

Arnold Wayne Godwin 

Earl Gregory Hamel 
James Lambert Hickey 
John Leonard Hubbard 



Edward R. Johnston 

Robert Frederick Klein 

Joseph N. Langan 

Brother Philip Laperle, S.C. 

Brother Lucian Larroque, S.C. 

Harold T. McCormick 

Walter Joseph Mclnerney 

Brother Gabriel Marquis, S.C. 

R. F. Mullan, S.J. 

Stanley Thomas Nolan 

Francis C. O'Connor, S.J. 

Robert Bruce Olney 

Thomas Francis O'Malley 

Robert Owens, S.J. 

John Charles Pelham 

John Thomas Prudhomme 

John Joseph J. Redden 

Paul Fusz Ring, Jr. 

R. T. Gibbens Robichaux 

John Anthony Schmidt 

William J. Schmitt, S.J. 

Pierre F. Schwing 

James LeLonard August Singler 

James Charles Stubbers 

James Gerard Walsh 



Bachelor of Science in Commerce 



Walter T. Bower 

Joseph Abella Coakley 

Harry Joseph Collins, Jr. 

William Paul Dickson 

James Francis Donahue 

Eugene G. Dorn 

William Joseph Downey 

Sidney Perryman duMont, Jr. 

Harry L. Evans 

Marton Kenneth Girod 

George A. Halpin, Jr. 

Wadih F. Hawie, Jr. 

Anthony George Jacque 

Robert M. Jessie 

Claude Myron Johnson, Jr. 



Francis Hill Keene 

Andrew J. Layden 

Daniel W. LeBlanc 

Larry C. McGinn 

cum laude 

Joseph L. Nusz 

Robert Stanley Schutzman 

John Ed Tait, Jr. 

Paul Rossa Thompson 

Maximo E. Velasquez 

Eugene E. Wessely 

Lawrence E. Whittington, Jr. 

John E. Williams 

Robert E. Williams, III 

Calvin L. Yelverton 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Seventy-nine 



July 20, 1951 



Bachelor of Arts 



Robert George Castelin 

Harold F. Cohen, Jr., S.J. 

Daniel A. Creagan, S.J. 



C. Earl Johnson, S.J. 

Benjamin Houstis Kilborn 

Richard M. Thomas, S.J. 



Bachelor of Science 



Marshall Gerolemo Avellino 
Brother Martin Breault, S.CC. 

Charles James Caruso 

Brother Stephen Cloonan, S.C. 

Brother Raphael Dolan, S.C. 

Valentino P. Ficcio 

Warren Luenberg Finch 

Brother Thaddeus Gabelly, S.C. 



Brother Emile Goudreau, S.C. 

Joseph Honovich, Jr. 

James Andrew Lockett, S.J. 

Brother Adrian Morel, S.C. 

Brother Louis Bernard Trahan, S.C. 

Brother Kostka Wolhbruck, S.C. 

Donald Haynes Wood 



Bachelor of Science in Commerce 



James Clayton Bankhead 
John Fordney Cummins 



John Edward Markham, Jr. 



Page Eighty 



Spring Hill College 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



REGULAR SESSION (1951-1952) 

FULL TIME STUDENTS 



(Explanation of Code: A — arts; N — Natural Science; S — Social Science; C — Commerce; 
1 — Freshman; 2 — Sophomore; 3 — Junior; 4 — Senior; 5 — Post-graduate; O — Special; a code 
symbol compounded from preceding appears in parentheses after the student's name in 
the following list.) 



Adams, Charles (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ahern, James M. (N2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Allen, Donald L. (Nl) 

Pass Christian, Miss. 
Allen, James T. (CI) 

Dallas, Texas 
Allsup, William J. (SI) 

Whistler, Ala. 
Alonzo, Reynolds T., Jr. (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Alvarez, R. A., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Anderson, R. H., Jr., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Anello, Joseph P., Jr., (Nl) 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
Ardoin, Johnnie L. (A2) 

Eunice, La. 
Averett, William R. (Al) 

Semmes, Ala. 
Bahlinger, M. J., S.J. 

(A4) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Bahlinger, Reginald T. (CI) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Baisden, Ralph L. (N3) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Baker, John Robert (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Baker, Richard, S.J., (A3) 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
Ball, James A., (S2) 

Loretto, Ky. 
Ball, James Donald, (C3) 

Loretto, Ky. 



Ball, T. Nelson, (C3) 

Loretto, Ky. 
Ball, William G., (CI) 

Loretto, Ky. 
Barbee, John P., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Barrett, George, (S4) 

Nashville, Tenn. 
Barry, Joseph K., (N5) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Barter, Charles J., (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bates, Warren K., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Beatty, Ashley, H., Jr., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bedsole, Edward, (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bell, John A., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Benitez, Ray A., (S4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Benton, Clarence S., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Berte, Joseph J., (N3) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Beshera, Bro. Fabin, (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Best, Harry L., Jr., (C2) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Bielman, Lawrence A., (Nl) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Bishop, Bro. Bennet, S.C. 

(S3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Bizzell, Piatt Edward, (SO) 

Warrington, Fla. 



Blackburn, Gerald J., (C2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Blackwell, Robert J., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Blanchard, D. A., Jr., (A2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bollettieri, Nicholas J., (S3) 

Pelham, N. Y. 
Boiling, Frank, (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Boiling, Milton J., Ill, (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bordelon, Bro. Kenan, (A3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Bosarge, Joseph, (N4) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Bosarge, J. L., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bosarge, Wade, (C4) 

Bayou La Batre, Ala. 
Boucher, Bro. Jean-Marie, 

(S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Bourdin, A. N., Jr., (C3) 

Pass Christian, Miss. 
Bourg, C. J., S.J., (A3) 

Chevy Chase, Md. 
Boyce, Bro. Placid, (S3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Brady, David, (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Brady, Edward J., S.J., (S3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Braman, Kempton B., (CI) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Brannon, Edward, (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Eighty-one 



Braquet, A. J., S.J., (C3) 

Kaplan, La. 
Brennan, David M., (SI) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Brennan, Thomas E., (S2) 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
Brennan, Walter, S.J., (N4) 

San Matio, Calif. 
Broadus, James C, (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Brocato, V. J., Jr., (S3) 

Clarksdale, Miss. 
Bronson, Milton N., (S3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Brown, Burnell R., Jr., (N2) 

Dallas, Texas 
Brown, Tommy L., (Nl) 

Dallas, Texas 
Brown, William T., (Nl) 

Miami, Fla. 
Bruni James A., (A3) 

North Bergen, N. J. 
Bubb, Roy L., (N2) 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Buckley, Bro. Kevin, (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Buckley, P. T., Jr., (N2) 

Jackson, Miss. 
Bullock, C. Curtis, Jr., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Bullock, W. M., Jr., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Burch, Joseph B., Ill, (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Burke, Barron C, (CI) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Burroughs, Kenneth, (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Butterfield, Dennis O., (SI) 

Western Springs, 111. 
Byrd, James C, (C4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Cadden, Thomas W., (SI) 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Callahan, Richard D., (S4) 

Bergenfield, N. J. 
Callan, John P., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Campbell, Patrick F.X., (N2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Canning, John, (Nl) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Carey, Hugh, (S2) 

Houston, Texas 
Carney, John K., (A4) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Carroll, William J., (N2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Carter, J. C, S.J. (N4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Carter, Robert J., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Carwie, John, (N3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cazayoux, Robert, (Nl) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Chiepalich, Mitchell J., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Christie, Thomas P., (Al) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Cimino, Richard D., (N2) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Clark, Joseph S., (SI) 

Shreveport, La. 
Clarke, William A., (S3) 

Bowling Green, Ky. 
Clarke, William E., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cleary, William F., (C2) 

West Palm Beach, Fla. 
Clement, John F., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Clements, Mayo, (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Clerkin, Robert T., (S4) 

Chicago, 111. 
Cloney, Robert D., S.J., (S4) 

New Gardens, N. Y. 
Cochran, Lemuel K., (Nl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Cohen, Harold F., S.J., (5) 

New Orleans, La. 
Colbert, Thomas F., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Coles, Edward T., S.J. (C4) 

Shreveport, La. 
Colligan, Bro. Gary, (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Collignon, Bro. Jean-Louis, 

(A2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Conlan, F. J., S.J., (A3) 

Dallas, Texas. 
Connell, Richard C, (S4) 

Racine, Wis. 
Connolly, John R., (N4) 

Newark, N. J. 
Connolly, Bro. R., (N2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Connor, Richard B., (C4) 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Cooke, David, S.J., (N3) 

Marinette, Wis. 
Cornell, Richard P., (A2) 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Coughlin, L. V., Jr., (S2) 

Memphis, Tenn. 
Covan, James E., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cox, James E., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cox, William D., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Coyle, Charles G., Jr., (S3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Creagan, D. A., S.J., (A5) 

New Orleans, La. 
Creel, Luther S., Jr., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cruthirds, Joseph A., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Cuevas, Lawrence C, (CI) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Cunning, James Harry (CI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Cush, Casino, Jr., (N4) 

Shreveport, La. 
Cush, Maynard E., (C3) 

Shreveport, La. 
Daly, Thomas, (A4) 

Pelham Manor, N. Y. 
Danne, William (CI) 

Chicago, 111. 
D'Amato, Nicholas A. (N3) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Daniels, Douglas (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Daugherty, Hiram G., (C4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Davis, James B., (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Dean, William C, (S3) 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
DeBarros, Julius F., (S3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Deeves, J. F., S.J. (S4) 

New Orleans, La. 
DeFatta, Vincent P. (SI) 

Shreveport, La. 
Degnan, James P., (S2) 

Memphis, Tenn. 
Degnan, Joseph E., (A4) 

Maiden, Mass. 
DeLage, C. J. B., IV (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
DeLorme, C. T., Jr., (C2) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Dever, David J., (N3) 

Miami Beach, Fla. 
Devine, John F., S.J., (S4) 

Melrose Park, Pa. 
Devine, Neil J. (CI) 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Dewine, James E., (S3) 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Diaz, Manuel A., (N3) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Diez, Charles, Jr., (S4) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Dick, Hesden H., (SI) 

Westwego, La. 
Doerfler, Lawrence J., (S2) 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Doiron, John R., Jr., (C3) 

Baton Rouge, La. 



Page Eighty-two 



Spring Hill College 



Donovan, James F., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Dooley, James E., (SI) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Dougherty, J. J., S.J. (A3) 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Drago, Ronald B., (Al) 

Chicago, 111. 
Dretzka, Raymond J. (S3) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Duffey, Norman A., (S3) 

New York, N. Y. 
Duffy, John A., Jr., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Duffy, Thomas K., (Cl) 

Miami, Fla. 
Dughi, Charles H., (S44) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Duke, Vernon E., (Cl) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Edmiston, C. H., Jr., (SI) 

Miami, Fla. 
Egan, James J. (C3) 

Oak Park, 111. 
Egan, Robert W. (C4) 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Eldridge, Hubert H. (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ellis, Alvin C, (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ellis, Troy Hickman, (N2) 

Whistler, Ala. 
Ellzey, Samuel E., r., (A3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Erb, Dan M., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ernst, John L., (S2) 

Pine Bluff, Ark. 
Ervin, Robert T., Ill, (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Evans, Benedict E., (N3) 

Augusta, S. C. 
Evans, Billy Dale, (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Evans, Bro. Carl, (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Evans, Ferman J., Jr., (SI) 

Shreveport, La. 
Fagerstrom, Wayne, (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Falgout, Bro. Neri, (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Farrell, Garrett B., Jr., (N2) 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Faucher, Bro. Matthew (A4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Favre, William R., Jr., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Fedor, Richard E., (N3) 

Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 
Fedor, Robert L., (S4) 

Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 



Fenly, Charles E., (C3) 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Ferris, Albert A., (SI) 

Shreveport, La. 
Fertitta, Vincent, Jr., (Cl) 

New Orleans 22, La. 
Ficcio, Valentino, (PG) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Findley, Andrew L., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Fisher, Joseph N., (S3) 

Pelham Manor, N.Y. 
Flautt, Frank H., (SI) 

Sidon, Miss. 
Fontaine, Bro. F. X., (A4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Fox, Alex P., (SI) 

University City, Mo. 
Frederick, Jerome A., (S4) 

West Allis, Wis. 
Friscia, Pat F., (S2) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Fulton, Frank B., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Gaiennie, Richard M. (SI) 

Opelousas, La. 
Gallagher, W. B., Jr., (N4) 

Ocala, Fla. 
Garraway, Jimmy, (S4) 

Irvington, Ala. 
Garrich, William J. (SI) 

Newport, Ark. 
Garrison, Bro. Owen (N2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Gaudin, Bro. R. J., (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Gaudin, Bro. Roger, (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Genest, Stephen A., (N3) 

Miami Shores 38, Fla. 
Gibbons, Howell E., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Gibson, Dewey A., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Gilbert, James R., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Gilmore, T. Rolla, (Nl) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Gonzalez, Robert, (N2) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Gorham, Vincent R., (N2) 

Lake Worth, Fla. 
Gorman, George H., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Gouin, Jean L., (S2) 

Montreal 8, Canada 
Graham, Edgar L., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Graham, Robert E., (CO) 

Bayou La Batre, Ala. 
Green, Raymond B., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Grieb /William E. (Cl) 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
Griffin, Frank X., (SI) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Griffin, T. A., S.J., (A3) 

Albuquerque, N. M. 
Grimsley, Aaron D., (Cl) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Gunthorpe, C. H., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hairston, Legare, Jr., (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hallett, Garth, S.J., (S4) 

Fairhope, Ala. 
Halpin, Michael J., (C2) 

St. Louis, 111. 
Hanlon, William J., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hannigan, H. B., (S4) 

Chicago, 111. 
Hardy, Dennis, (C4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Hardy, Norman, (Cl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Harris, Edgar C, (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Heggeman, B. J., Jr., (S2) 

St. Louis 21, Mo. 
Heneghan, Bro. Brian, (N2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Herlong, T. L., S.J., (N4) 

Lake Charles, La. 
Herold, Vincent R., (S4) 

Paterson, N. J. 
Herrin, George, (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hickey, T. Allen, (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hickey, Thomas J., Jr., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Higgins, James E., (A2) 

Hopkinsville, Ky. 
Hill, Arthur B., (SI) 

Dallas, Texas 
Hill, Robert A. (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hilton, Jerome E., (Nl) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Himel, Eddie J., (Nl) 

Houma, La. 
Hinton, G. L., Jr., (C2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Hoar, Leo J., (A3) 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Hodges, Charles R., (N2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Hoffman, Joseph J., (S3) 

Paducah, Ky. 
Hogan, Glenn D., (Al) 

Sarasota, Fla. 
Holland, Peter B., (C4) 

Chicago, 111. 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Eighty-three 



Honodel, Richard, (C4) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Hooten, Joseph A., (Al) 

Boston, Mass. 
Howell, E. N., S.J., (N3) 

Sayville, N. Y. 
Howell, Frank Wm, (Al) 

Sayville, N. Y. 
Hudson, Harold, (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Hudson, W. C, (CI) 

Whistler, Ala. 
Hughes, Gerald T., (A2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Hunter, Bro. Marvin, (Al) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Ibsen, Preben B., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Irby, Francis D., (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Iturbe, Francisco, (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Jackson, J. L., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Jackson, R. E., Jr., (C4) 

Somerville, N. J. 
Jacob, Leo L., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Jenemann, A. H., S.J., (N3) 

Drexel Hill, Pa. 
Jennings, Phil W., (S2) 

Thiensville, Wis. 
Johnson, Earl, S.J., (A5) 

Shreveport, La. 
Johnson, James R., (A3) 

Montgomery, Ala. 
Johnson, Joseph B., (Nl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Johnson, Martin J., Jr., (N2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Johnson, Maurice J. (C2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Jones, Alfred P. (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Jones, Bryson D. (Nl) 

Shreveport, La. 
Jongebloed, Nick, (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Joseph, William, (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Jumonville, Robert J., (N2) 

Napoleonville, La. 
Junkin, W. J., S.J., (A5) 

Natchez, Miss. 
Kain, James S., (S3) 

Sarasota, Fla. 
Karcher, T. J., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Kelly, Emmett, Jr., (N2) 

Lake Worth, Fla. 
Kelton, Frank H., (C3) 
Pensacola, Fla. 



Renter, William D., (Nl) 

Chicago, 111. 
Kerrigan, Edward V., (CI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Kerrigan, John Fergus, (CI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Kiernan, Thomas J., (N2) 

Belle Harbor, L. I., N. Y. 
Killorin, Edward W., (S4) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Kinnally, William J., (SI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Kinsey, Herbert P., (Nl) 

Mobile. Ala. 
Kirkland, Ray, (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Kirwan, John, Jr., (C3) 

Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 
Kittler, Frederick J., (N2) 

Shreveport, La. 
Kitts, Gerard A., (SI) 

Sheffield, Ala. 
Klepac, James, (C2) 

Jackson, Ala. 
Knight, James M., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Koch, Charles, S.J., (S3) 

Dallas, Texas 
Koehler, George E., (Al) 

Jefferson, Wis. 
Kokes, Charles M., (C2) 

Atkinson, Neb. 
Konzen, Bernard J., (N3) 

Chicago 19, 111. 
Kovacs, Stephen, Jr., (A2) 

W. Palm Beach, Fla. 
Kratzberg, Bro. DePaul, (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Kruse, Robert L., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
LaColla, Eugene M., (A4) 

Jamacia, L. I., N. Y. 
Ladnier, James K., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lafitteau, William B., (N2) 

Metairie, La. 
Largay, Ralph J., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
LaSalle, Alfred W., (S4) 

New Iberia, La. 
Latham, Eldred S., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
LeBlanc, John M., (S3) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Leighton, P. H., Jr., (N2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Lepre, Bro. Jerome, (C2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Leon, Francis, (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Leurck, Earl D., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Lilley, John J., (CI) 

Whistler, Ala. 
Linares, Carlos, (C2) 

Havana, Cuba 
Linares, Francisco G., (C3) 

Havana, Cuba 
Lindstrom H. A., Jr., (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Livingston, W. O., Jr., (CI) 

Sanford, Fla. 
Lockett, J. A., S.J., (S5) 

New Orleans, La. 
Logan, Terry, (S3) 

San Antonio, Texas 
Long, Bernard J., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Long, Luther T., Jr., (Nl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Lopez, Roberto, (CI) 

Havana, Cuba 
Louapre, A. C, S.J., (N3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Lousteau, Gordon J., (C2) 

Norco, La. 
Lowe, Frank C, (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lowery, Ronald M., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lowrey, Jack, (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Loyed, William R., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lubel, Michael, (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lucey, Kerry Michael, (Al) 

Ashton, Md. 
Lydon, Bro. Aloysius, (A2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Lynam, Frank L., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Lynch, Gerald H., (CI) 

Aiken, S. C. 
Lynch, Bro. Jude, (C4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Mac Donald, R. J., (C2) 

Washington 20, D. C. 
MacMurtrie, J. A., S.J., (A4) 

Overbrook Hills, Pa. 
McAleer, Robert N., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McAleer, William V., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McCabe, John E., (S2) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
McCaffrey, J. E., Jr., (C3) 

Georgetown, S. C. 
McCarthy, A. J., S.J., (N3) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
McCarthy, Denis, (C3) 

Glen Head, S. Y. 
McCloskey, Bro. Dom., (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 



Page Eighty-jour 



Spring Hill College 



McCourt, Charles L., (C4) 

Pine Bluff, Ark. 
McCue, Bro. Duane, (C2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
McDermott, John, (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McDermott, Wm. H., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McDonald, T. R, (N3) 

Chicago, 111. 
McGill, J. P., S.J., (N3) 

New Orleans, La. 
McGinn, George P., (C2) 

Savannah, Ga. 
McGowan, R. W., S.J., (A3) 

Dallas, Texas 
McGowan, T. J., (A4) 

Birmingham, Ala. 
McGranahan, John M., (S4) 

Shreveport, La. 
McGuinness, Bro. B. (A2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
McGuire, M. A., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McHugh, R. J., Jr., (SI) 

Selma, Ala. 
Mcllwain, Wm. B., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McKean, Louis, (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
McKinnon, Charles E., (Nl) 

Tampa, Fla. 
McLaughlin, Andrew, (C3) 

Paterson, N. J. 
McMorrow, Bro. Xavier, (N4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
McQuillen, C. J., Jr., (N4) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
McShane, Thomas, S.J. (N3) 

Omaha, Neb. 
Mahfouz, Happy, (SI) 

Alexandria, La. 
Maldonado, Jose, (SI) 

Monterrey, Mex. 
Maloney, F. James, (S4) 

Larchmont, N. Y. 
Malsch, James R., (SI) 

Shreveport, La. 
Mansur, Alex. E., (CI) 

Aruba, Netherlands, 

W. Indies 
Mansur, Jossy M., (CI) 

Aruba, Netherlands, 

W. Indies 
Mansur, Ruben Damian, (CI) 

Aruba, Netherlands 

W. Indies 
March, Edward R., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Marchiony, L. J., (Al) 

New York, N. Y. 



Markwalter, Jojhn S., (C2) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Marone, Biagino, (A3) 

Rochester, N. Y. 
Martin, Bro. Claude, (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Mason, Edward A., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Massari, Franklin S., (Nl) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Massey, Kenneth, (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Matthews, Donald R., (S2) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Matthews, J. P., Jr., (CI) 

Little Rock, Ark. 
Mattingly, Bro. Loyola, (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Meagher, John, S.J., (S3) 

Norfolk, Va. 
Meier, Thomas J., (S3) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Meinhardt, Wm. T., (S3) 

Citronelle, Ala. 
Meyers, L. E., S.J., (A4) 

New Orleans, La. 
Michels, John G., (A4) 

Rockaway Pk., N. Y. 
Mills, Wm. W., (S3) 

Citronelle, Ala. 
Miciotto, John C, (N3) 

Shreveport, La. 
Middendorf, R. J., S.J., (N3) 

Covington, Ky. 
Miranda, Emilio A., (Nl) 

San Juan, P. R. 
Mitchell, Archie G., (Cl) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Mitchell, J. L., Jr., (Cl) 

Norfolk, Va. 
Mixon, Lonnie L., (SI) 

Whistler, Ala. 
Monica, Louis, (S3) 

Garyville, La. 
Montgomery, E. C, (C2) 

New Orleans, La. 
Moore, Milton, (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Morgan, John F., (A3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Morrison, J. G., Jr., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Morrissette, H. Taylor, (S3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Mould, Owen A., (S3) 

N. Arlington, Va. 
Mouton, James B., (SI) 

Lafayette, La. 
Mouton, John A., (C3) 

Lafayette, La. 
Mueller, Edward A., Jr., (C2) 

Milwaukee, Wis. 



Mugnier, Jules R., Jr., (S4) 

Birmingham, Ala. 
Mulcahy, Robert J., (Cl) 

Chicago, 111. 
Mulherin, Joseph B., (S2) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Mulherin, Louis, Jr., (C3) 

Augusta, Ga. 
Muller, Paul R., (SI) 

Selma, Ala. 
Murray, John W., (S2) 

Decatur, 111. 
Murray, Paul D., (S2) 

Whistler, Ala. 
Murray, William W„ (S3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Naman, Louis J., (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Naud, Joseph N., (N2) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Naughton, Thomas J., (SI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Nelson, William C, (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Neuhoff, Lorenz, III, (C4) 

Roanoke, Va. 
Newell, Edward J., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Newell, Thomas J., (Cl) 

Chicago 51, 111. 
Nietzel, Earl F., Jr., (Cl) 

Chicago 43, 111. 
Nieves, Jose A., (Cl) 

Guayama, P. R. 
Nieves, Luis A., (Cl) 

Guayama, P. R. 
Nobles, Charles A., Jr., (Nl) 

Georgetown, S. C. 
Parker, Jerry B., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Partridge, David R., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Paton, Wm. D., Jr., (C4) 

Montgomery, Ala. 
Patrick, Leslie, (S44) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Pearce, Donald, S.J., (A3) 

Miami, Fla. 
Pelletier, Bro. Clement, (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Peresich, John P., (Cl) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Perlman, Murray C, (Cl) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Perry, Joseph M., S.J., (A3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Perry, Ralph J., (S2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Petit, John, Jr., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Petit, Louis V., (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Eighty-five 



Phaneuf, Bro. Alfred, (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Phillips, A. Pat., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Phillips, Robert A., (Si) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Picard, Albert, A., Jr., (C3) 

Worcester, Mass. 
Pieper, Clarence, (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Pierce, Edwin P., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Pierce, John A., (Nl) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Pitalo, Marion D., (Cl) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Pocase, Vincent J., Jr., (C4) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Pompei, Ronald J., (Cl) 

Fairlawn, N. J. 
Potts, James H., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Powell, Charles, (S3) 

Malcolm, Ala. 
Powell, Walter W., (S2) 

Little Rock, Ark. 
Power, John R, (C3) 

Norfolk, Va. 
Praytor, Hugh T., Jr., (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Proulx, Bro. Clarence, (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Quinn, Gerald W., (SI) 

Memphis, Tenn. 
Raben, Louis W., Jr., (C4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Ramos, Juan A., (Nl) 

SanLorenzo, P. R. 
Rasp, Bro. Sylvester, (C4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Ratchford, R. J, S.J., (N3) 

Clearwater, Fla. 
Rederscheid, Donald J., (C4) 

Larchmont, N. Y. 
Redlingshafer, R. A., (C3) 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Reed, Jack R., (S2) 

Eunice, La. 
Regan, Jack G., (Cl) 

Detroit, Mich. 
Reidy, Jerome F., (Cl) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Reilly, Richard J., (N2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Rein, William T., (Cl) 

Chicago, 111. 
Reisch, Milton L., S.J., (N3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Resha, James J., (C3) 

Birmingham, Ala. 
Revere, Joseph M., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Reynolds, A. E., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Richard, Bro. Louis J., (S4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ring, David A., (SI) 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Rives, John E., (Nl) 

Birmingham, Ala. 
Robinson, P. M., Jr., (N2) 

Memphis, Tenn. 
Rodriguez, Alfredo M., (S3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Rodriguez, Francisco J., (Nl) 

Preston Oriente, Cuba 
Rooney, Francis, S. J., (S3) 

New York City, N. Y. 
Roper, Robert G., (Cl) 

Shreveport, La. 
Rountree, Wm. F., Jr., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Rowell, John L., Jr., (N3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Roy, Bro. Benedict, (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Russell, Lloyd W., (N3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Ryan, George W., Ill, (C4) 

Forest Hills, N. Y. 
Ryan, James P., (S3) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Salvo, Ronald J., (Nl) 

Natchez, Miss. 
Salmon, Michael J., (A4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Sanchez, J. E., S.J., (A4) 

Mexico, D. F. 
Sapp, J. Everett, (A4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sarra, Vincent D., (Si) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Saxer, Robert J., (N3) 

Hasbrouck Heights, N. J. 
Schafer, John A., (C4) 

Wheeling, W. Va. 
Schambeau, W. A., (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Schell, Donald J., (C3) 

Chicago, 111. 
Schilling, Roy, S.J., (A3) 

New Orleans, La. 
Schluter, John L., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Schuler, Mark T., S.J., (N3) 

Hamilton, Ohio 
Schwing, James W., (SI) 

New Iberia, La. 
Scopes, John T., (Si) 

Shreveport, La. 
Scott, Marvin T., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Scott, William A., (S2) 

Chicago 20, 111. 



Scotto, Anthony, (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sedlin, Leonard H., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sentilles, Bro. W. J., (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Shea, William A., (Cl) 

Midlothian, 111. 
Sheffield, Edward J. (A4) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Shields, James A., (Nl) 

Valley Stream, N. Y. 
Shipp, Alton P., (Al) 

Semmes, Ala. 
Shirvell, Mro. Randal, (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Shoulders, Jack M., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Siener, George H., (A4) 

Spartanburg, S. C. 
Sindik, Matthew A., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Skipper, Kenneth J., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Skivo, Anthony M., (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Slaton, Henry C, (C44) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Smith, Edgar M., (SI) 

Eight Mile, Ala. 
Smith, Everett H., (Cl) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Smith, Raymond I., Jr., (N2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Smith, Samuel K., Jr., (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Smith, Sydney C, r., (Nl) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Smith, William H., (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Snyder, Arthur F., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sonnhalter, Edward, (C3) 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Soto, Peter J., Jr., (N4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Soule, Pearce T., (S3) 

Portsmouth, Va. 
Stafford-Smith, E. B., Jr., 

<C4) 

Madison, N. J. 
St-Amand, Bro. Chas., (S4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Stavrakos, Harry, Jr., (S3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Stephens, A. J., Jr., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Steinbach, Thomas, (N4) 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Stewart, Doyle, (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 



Page Eighty-six 



Spring Hill College 



Sullivan, Terrcnce P., (CI) 

Chicago, 111. 
Surratt, John H., (A3) 

Greenville, S. C. 
Sweeney, Frederick K., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Sweeney, Walter G., (CI) 

Miami, Fla. 
Tardy, Thomas R., (C2) 

West Helena, Ark. 
Taylor, John S., (Nl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Taylor, Owen C, (Si) 

Prichard, Ala. 
Taylor, Wm. H., Jr., (N3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Tebo, Burton E., (A4) 

Miami, Fla. 
Tellier, Bro. Alphonse, (A4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Terrell, Anthony O., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Testin, Henry S., Jr., (C3) 
Thierry, Paul A., (N2) 

Sarasota, Fla. 
Thoman, C. J., S.J., (N3) 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Thomas, David S., (Al) 

St. Louis 11, Mo. 
Thomas, R. M., S.J., (A5) 

Saffner, Fla. 
Tonsmeire, Louis E., (A2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Tonsmeire, Wm. H., (CI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Toups, Bro. David, (N3) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Traynor, J. J., S.J., (S3) 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Tylenda, J. N., S.J., (N3) 

Dickson City, Pa. 
Uchello, Louis C, Jr., (A2) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Underhill, Wm. E., S.J., (S3) 

Dallas, Texas. 



Valance, Ed. H., S.J. (N3) 

Buffalo, N. Y. 
Vassar, Frank G., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Vella, John F., (CI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Veron, Ernest J., (CI) 

Lutcher, La. 
Vessels, J. E., S.J., (N3) 

McAllen, Texas 
Voelker, Bro. Alton, (A4) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Voigt, Bro. Justin, (S2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Waddell, George P., (C2) 

Chicago, 111. 
Wade, Michael, R., (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Wade, Thomas M., Jr., (Nl) 

Memphis, Tenn. 
Wade, William E., (N2) 

Germantown, Tenn. 
Wagner, John T., (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Walsh, James H., (S2) 

Sarasota, Fla. 
Walter, F. X., Ill, (A2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Wanucha, S. W., Jr., (S4) 

Chicago, 111. 
Ware, Thomas W., (CI) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Warren, David F., Jr., (N4) 

Biloxi, Miss. 
Waters, Perry, (N3) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Watkins, Bro. Rayner, (SI) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Weathers, Frank W., (CI) 

Houston, Texas 
Weathers, Henry, (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Welch, William W., (CI) 

Shreveport, La. 



Wheeler, L. McFarland, (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
White-Spunner, S. E., Jr., 

(C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Whiting, R. F., S.J., (N3) 

Titusville, Fla. 
Whittington, R. G., (A2) 

Houston, Texas 
Wielatz, Paul C, (SI) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Willemse, C. W., Ill, (C2) 

Tampa, Fla. 
Williams, Edward D., (SO) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Williams, Luis M., (C2) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Willisson, E. W., Jr., (Cl) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Wilson, C. W., S.J., (A4) 

Miami, Fla. 
Wilson, Henry, (S4) 

Chickasaw, Ala. 
Woodard, Roy E., II, (Al) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Woods, Bro. Cyril, (Al) 

Spring Hill, Ala. 
Woods, Robert Eugene, (S2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Woolsey, Jere E., Jr., (C3) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Wright, Emmitt O., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Yon, Keitte S., Jr., (C4) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Yost, Wm. H., Jr., (SI) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Zalopany, Peter E., (C2) 

Mobile, Ala. 
Zanone, Charles F., (C2) 

Memphis, Tenn. 
Zoghby, Michael E., (Cl) 

Prichard, Ala. 



Bulletin of Information 



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EVENING DIVISION 



Abrams, William F. 
Alexander, James R., Jr. 
Allen, Grace S. 
Anania, Josephine C. 
Angelo, Ruth 
Aycock, Daniel O. 
Banks, Betty L. 
Banks, Catherine N. 
Barnes, John J. 
Belcer, Michael 
Berg, Francis J. 
Betbeze, Joseph G. 
Biggs, Mabel D. 
Black, Jane I. 
Black, Marcus P. 
Bennette, Bro. Hubert 
Booth, Caroline E. 
Borden, Atwood N., Jr. 
Bowers, Bro Miguel 
Brabner, G. Reynolds 
Bradshaw, James E. 
Brady, David 
Brewton, William I. 
Brown, Stuart E. 
Bruce, Norma B. 
Burgoyne, Alice 
Burtu, Jeanne 
Capra, Joseph C. 
Cash, James W. 
Caspolich, Glen N. 
Chayko, Bro. Andries 
Ching, Timothy V. 
Clark, Ouida Jean 
Clarke, Dr. N. R., Jr. 
Clements, Mayo, Jr. 
Coe, Raymond B. 
Cole, Aileen H. 
Collins, Thomas O. 
Convy, Margaret D. 
Cowley, Mary Alida 
Crabtree, James T. 
Cybmoure, Robert N. 
Dacovich, Graham J. 
Dacovich, Joseph A., Jr. 
Dawson, Dudley E., Jr. 
Dawson, Lorene 
Debrow, Arnold D. 
Dees, John R., Jr. 
Demetropolis, Wilma K. 
Devery, Harry A. 
Dixon, Leon H. 
Duggan, Margaret 
Eastburn, Samuel G. 
Edwards, John D. 
Egan, William F. 
Eike, Rodney P. 
Ernest, Sidney W., Jr. 
Falls, Jack L. 
Farris, Wade G. 



Faulk, Meade B. 
Ferrouillat, Marjorie F. 
Finch, Warren 
Finkle, Ralph J. 
Flugel, Raymond R. 
Fritz, Kathleen R. 
Frye, Roland L. 
Fuqua, Estelle G. 
Gardner, Allen A., Jr. 
Giannatelli, Dora N. 
Gibson, Donald E. 
Gilbert, Margaret O. 
Giles, Cornelius W., Jr. 
Godbold, Norman J. 
Goff, Mary Margaret 
Grade, James J. 
Gray, Lucy B. 
Green, Georgia H. 
Griswold, Eldredge E., Jr. 
Hall, Ellen 
Hamilton, Milton K. 
Hare, Ila T. 
Hartley, Carl H. 
Hazel, Iola S. 
Hempstead, Louise M. 
Henderson, Kenneth E. 
Hines, Ruth D. 
Hobbs, Ema D. 
Holden, Vera D. 
Hughes, Una 
Hybart, Evelyn D. 
Inge, Francis H. 
Inge, Francis M., Jr. 
Jeffrey, Maude B. 
Jones, Troy H. 
Joseph, William F. 
Kamerman, Lawson L. 
Kastner, Marie A. 
Keller, Jean 
Kelley, Roberta 
Kelley, William R. 
Kincey, Truly E. 
Lacy, John I. 
Lambert, Harrie C. 
Larose, Bro. Nelson 
Layfield, Norman W. 
LeBlanc, Bro. Dacian 
Lee, Rufus B. 
Lilburn, Bert Joseph 
Little, Mazie 
McAleer, Joseph A. 
McCafferty, Robert E. 
McCann, Thomas Lee 
McCoy, James M. 
McDonald, Augusta M. 
McGinn, G. P. 
McLain, Ellis H. 
McNamara, Rose P. 
McPherson, Mary H. 



McQuillen, Robert E. 
Mackey, William E. 
Malone, Patricia F. 
Midgette, Joseph N., Jr. 
Militano, Simon P. 
Miller, Melgwin 
Moe, Lois 

Mulherin, Louis, Jr. 
Mullins, Gertiwyl M. 
Murphy, Naomi 
Napier, Velma S. 
Nelson, James C. 
Nelson, William W. 
Nettles, Delia 
Nolley, Royal R. 
Norville, Ann L. 
Oberkirch, Charles F. 
Oberkirch, Ollie A. 
Oldemoppen, Bernadette G. 
Overbey, Edward A., Sr. 
Park, Miles T. 
Parr, Bro. Joachim 
Patterson, Patrick J. 
Penny, Elizabeth 
Pettis, Woodie E . 
Pfister, Harriet S. 
Pierce, George H. 
Pocase, Vincent 
Portella, Joseph E. 
Pound, Cecile, G. 
Powell, Gracie F. 
Pruette, Louise B. 
Pullen, Victor W. 
Quina, George P. 
Redell, Margaret M. 
Reinhart, Margaret 
Reynolds, Mary Clare 
Roberts, Mabel C. 
Robinson, Theodore F. 
Rohmer, Margaret E. 
Rohmer, Robert T. 
Rolls, Eloise 
Rooney, Florence 
Schaffer, William J., Jr. 
Sells, Lily, T. 
Shelverton, Claude W. 
Sheridan, Charles A. 
Sisler, William W. 
Simmons, David W. 
Skivo, Anthony 
Slana, Edward M. 
Smith, Joseph F. 
Snyder, George F. 
Spear, Frank 
Speegle, Donald L. 
Sporna, Victoria A. 
Stallworth, Alice 
Stein, Margaret 
Steiner, Norma M. 



Page Eighty-eight 



Spring Hill College 



Stewart, Doyle H. 
Sweet, Melba C. 
Tait, Robert A. 
Tallon, Roy V., Jr. 
Taylor, Douglas K. 
Tebo, Burton 
Terrell, Dorothy V. 
Terrell, John D., Jr. 
Terrill, Edward D., Jr. 
Thompson, Robert C. 
Thorworth, William J. 



Adams, Dorothy J. 
Arata, Nettie C. 
Armington, Sr. Catherine 
Ballard, Edith M. 
Barnes, Shirley 
Berg, Mary E. 
Best, Barbara A. 
Blount, Frances W. 
Booker, Mary N. 
Bowden, Billie J. 
Brackett, Jeanette 
Brinkman, Barbara M. 
Brown, Joyce 
Byrd, Mrs. Ada 
Byrd, Maxine M. 
Carlisle, Josephine M. 
Calametti, Florence 
Clark, Ann E. 
Clower, Joyce R. 
Cochran, Ethel C. 
Connick, Jessie 
Crabtree, John 
Crane, Barbara E. 
Creel, Alice J. 
Davis, Mary L. 
Delaney, Helen E. 
Denney, Marie 
Dick, Herman 
Diemert, Joan L. 
Dixon, Sue 
Engwall, Christine 
Fendley, Betty J. 
Fincher, Catherine 



Turberville, Hattie B. 
Tuveson, Mae 
Unger, Elmer R. 
Vance, Joseph R. 
Vosburg, Velma J. 
Wade, Mack C. 
Wakefield, John F. 
Waters, Julia 
Weathers, Frank W. 
West, Orion, Jr. 
Williams Delores 

PART TIME STUDENTS 

Flowers, Katherine 
Gill, Rose L. 
Goff, Catherine 
Gregor, Diana 
Hamilton, Elizabeth A. 
Hammac, Joan 
Harwell, Bernadette 
Hastings, Bonnie 
Hay, Lois 
Hebert, Mary A. 
Helton, Betty J. 
Hendrix, Sara J. 
Johnson, Nora 
Kalfas, Angela M. 
Kelly, Ruth 
Konstanzer, Gladys K. 
Kraver, Charleca 
Kuykendall, Ruby J. 
Langan, Carmelite 
Leek, Annabell B. 
LeGros, Dolores T. 
Lilley, Kathleen P. 
Little, Betty 
Long, Patricia 
Loper, Gloria 
Lopez, Marjorie 
McCluskey, Margaret 
McQueen, Juanita 
Marler, Nanine F. 
Marse, Betty 
Mauldin, Frankie 
Montgomery, June 
Novak, Jonnie M. 



Williams, Luis M. 
Willingham, Barbara 
Wilson, Henry E. 
Wilson, William M. 
Winter, Jean E. 
Wohlbruck, Bro. Kostka 
Wyjhoskie, Henry J. 
Yates, Mrs. Clyde W. 
Yeager, Faye L. 
Young, Nancy C. 
Zapolsky, Thomas E. 



Patterson, Myrtle F. 
Poiroux, Jane 
Reilly, Patty 
Resmondo, Margaret E. 
Respess, Edith 
Reynolds, Doris 
Rigby, Betty J. 
Roberts, Ruth 
Rogers, Barbara, A. 
Rushing, Lela L. 
Salazar, Anita M. 
Sartin, Mary S. 
Shiver, Faith 
Shumate, Betty J. 
Simmons, Evelyn 
Simmons, Marie P. 
Stanley, Ruby N. 
Stewart, Alta C. 
Stone, Audrey 
Strachan, Shirley A. 
Stringer, Betty 
Sutton, Joy D. 
Thames, Mable A. 
Thomas, Zoe 
Thrash, Emma R. 
Uptagrafft, Ruth 
Violette, Barbara 
Wade, Mary F. 
White, Carolyn M. 
Williamson, Pearl N. 
Wiltz, Mary T. 
Winslow, Frankie J. 



SUMMER SESSION (1951) 



Avellino, Marshall 
Bahlinger, Marion, S.J. 
Baisden, Ralph L. 
Baker, Richard, S.J. 
Bankhead, J. C. 
Bauler, Robert 
Beauchamp, Sr. Benigna 
Bendillo, Bro. Victor 
Benson, Larry H. 
Benton, C. Steve 
Beshara, Bro. Fabian 
Bishop, Bro. Bennet 
Boggan, Sr. Ursula 



Bonnette, Bro. Hubert 
Bordelon, Bro. Kenan 
Bosarge, Carl C. 
Bosarge, Wade E. 
Boucher, Bro. Ernest 
Boucher, Bro. Jean-Marie 
Bourg, Carroll, S.J. 
Boyce, Bro. Placid 
Brady, Edward J., S.J. 
Braquet, A., S.J. 
Brashear, Bro. Firmin 
Breault, Bro. Martin 
Brennan, Walter, S.J. 



Bowers, Bro. Miguel 
Bronson, Milton 
Brou, Francis, S.J. 
Brown, J. R., Jr. 
Brown, Tommy L. 
Brown, Wm. T. 
Browning, J. E., S.J. 
Bruce, Marion A. 
Bubb, Roy L. 
Buckley, Bro. Albert 
Cabelly, Bro. Owen 
Campbell, Patrick F. 
Canning, John 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Eighty-nine 



Carter, James C, S.J. 
Caruso, Chas. J. 
Castelin, Robert G. 
Cazayaux, Robert 
Campagne, Bro. Norman 
Chavers, Mrs. Opal 
Cimino, Richard 
Clancy, Thomas, S.J. 
Clarke, Sr. Austin 
Clarke, Wm. A. 
Cloney, Robert D., S.J. 
Cloonan, Bro. Stephen 
Cobb, Jeptha B. 
Cobb, James G. 
Coffey, Jack 
Cohen, Harold, S.J. 
Colbert, Thomas 
Coley, David R., Ill 
Conlan, Francis, S.J. 
Connolly, Bro. Robert 
Cooke, David, S.J. 
Corr, Sr. Elizabeth 
Cox, Bro. Jogues 
Cox, Zoe Belle 
Coxwell, Merrida P. 
Crabtree, Sr. Johanna 
Creagan, Daniel, S.J. 
Cush, Casimo J. 
Cush, Maynard E. 
Cutcliff, Sr. Francis 
D'Amato, Nicholas A. 
Daniels, Douglas 
Daugherty, H. G. 
Dick, Herman G. 
Dougherty, James J., S.J. 
Deeves, John, S.J. 
DeBarros, Julius F. 
Delaney, Sr. Maura 
DeMouy, Martin 
Devine, John F., S.J. 
Diez, Charles, Jr. 
Dugas, Bro. Juan 
Dolan, Bro. Raphael 
Donaldson, Sr. Ardan 
Donivan, Sr. Matilda 
Douglas, John 
Duff, Donald F. 
Dulion, L. V., Jr. 
Earp, Genevieve 
Egan, James J., Jr. 
Ellis, Troy, Jr. 
Evans, Billy D. 
Evans, Bro. Carl 
Marrell, Garrett 
Faucher, Bro. Matthew 
Faulk, Marylyn L. 
Ficcio, Valentino 
Flynn, Charles B. 
Fontaine, Bro. Francis X. 
Frederic, Paul, S.J. 
Freeman, Warren, S.J. 
Frizzell, Wm. H. 

Page Ninety 



Gaudin, Bro. Roger 
Gibbens, Bro. Julian 
Gibbons, Bro. Terence 
Goellner, Bro Cury 
Gonzalez, Robert 
Gorday, Wm. B. 
Goudreau, Bro. Emile 
Griffin, Thomas, S.J. 
Grottendick, Sr. Philip 
Gunthorpe, Clarence 
Hallett, Garth L., S.J. 
Halpin, Sr. Ambrose 
Hankins, Katherine 
Hanlan, Wm. J., Ill 
Hargrove, Hilda Z. 
Hawkins, Jas. B. 
Hays, Ann T. 
Hebert, Bro. Cecil 
Hening, Sr. Ruth 
Heneghan, Bro. Brian 
Her long, T. L., S.J. 
Hiatt, Wood C. 
Hickey, T. J., Jr. 
Hinton, Mary M. 
Hoar, Leo J., Jr. 
Holloway, Alvin J., S.J. 
Horstmann, R. B., S.J. 
Hough, Mamie D. 
Howard, R. J., S.J. 
Howell, E. N., S.J. 
Hunt, Sr. Benigna 
Hyndman, Ernest R. 
Ibsen, Preben 
Jackson, Bro. Alberic. 
Jarreau, Niel, S.J. 
Jenemann, Albert, S.J. 
Jenniskens, Thomas, S.J. 
Johnson, James R. 
Kain, James S. 
Kaller, John T. 
Kilborn, Ben 
Kitts, Gerald A. 
Koch, Charles, S.J. 
Ladnier, James K. 
Lancaster, Margaret 
Laperle, Bro. Philip 
Leatherwood, Emma 
LeBlanc, John M. 
LeBlanc, Bro. Rene 
Leon, Francis 
Leonard, Sr. Leonard 
Lepre, Bro. Jerome 
Long, Luther T., Jr. 
Longshore, Walter 
Lorio, Br. Farrel 
Louapre, Albert, S.J. 
Lousteau, Gordon 
Lydon, Bro. Aloysius 
Lynch, Bro. Jude 
MacMurtrie, J. A., S.J. 
McCann, Thomas L. 
McCann, William D. 



McBride, Wm. H., S.J. 
McCarthy, Alan, S.J. 
McCarthy, Paul, S.J. 
McCloskey, Bro. Dominic 
McCormick, William 
McCue, Bro. Duane 
McDonald, Thomas 
McGill, Joseph, S.J. 
McGowan, Thomas J. 
McGowan, R. W., S.J. 
McGuinness, Bro. Brennan 
McKee, Robert 
McKenna, Rev. George 
McLaughlin, Sr. Josephine 
McMorrow, Bro. Xavier 
McNeill, Ola 
McShane, Thomas, S.J. 
Mareno, Edna L. 
Markham, John, Jr. 
Marone, Biagino 
Marquis, Bro. Gabriel 
Martin, Bro. Claude 
Mason, Mildred 
Mattingly, Bro. Loyola 
May, Rosemary 
Meagher, J. ],, S.J. 
Mendelson, Bro. Sherwin 
Mese, J. D. 
Messonnier, Bro. Rian 
Meyers, L. E., S.J. 
Miciotto, John C. 
Middendorf, Richard, S.J. 
Mills, William W. 
Moore, Milton 
Monica, Louis 
Montero, Wilson 
Morel, Bro. Adrian 
Mullen, Bro. Dermot 
Mullins, R. Jerome, S.J. 
Murphy, George A., S.J. 
Myer, Ethel 
Naman, Louis, Jr. 
Nee, Walter, S.J. 
Nichols, Marie A. 
Nolan, Daniel B. 
Noto, Thomas 
Norville, William J., S.J. 
O'Brien, William, S.J. 
O'Grady, Bro. Conan 
O'Neal, Norman, S.J. 
O'Shea, Bro. Brendan 
Owens, Robert, S.J. 
Paton, William 
Pearce, James D., S.J. 
Pelletier, Bro. Clement 
Perry, Joseph, SJJ. 
Phaneuf, Bro. Alfred 
Phillips, A. Patrick 
Pocase, Vincent J. 
Poche, Louis A., S.J. 
Porcella, Bro. Edwin 
Proulx, Bro. Clarence 

Spring Hill College 



Przytulski, Bro. Sigmund 
Purdy, John, Jr. 
Quina, Sr. Alcuin 
Quina, Sr. Teresita 
Rasp, Bro. Sylvester 
Reisch, Milton, S.J. 
Repp, Florence C. 
Reynolds, Bro. Neil 
Rieser, Sr. Rose Mary 
Rimes, Robert, S.J. 
Roberts, Corinne B. 
Robichaux, Francis 
Rodriguez, Alfred 
Rogge, Norman, S.J. 
Rooney, Francis, S.J. 
Roy, Bro. Benedict 
Rowell, J. L., Jr. 
Ruff, Wm. F. 
Russell, L. W. 
Sanchez, J. E., S.J. 
Schilling, R., S.J. 
Schuler, M., S.J. 
Schwing, James 
Schwing, Rev. John 



Scott, Marvin T. 
Scotto, Anthony 
Sells, Lily T. 
Shirvell, Bro. Randall 
Shirvell, Bro. Raymond 
Shope, Ethel I. 
Slaton, H. C, Jr. 
Smith, R. T., Jr. 
Sindik, M. A. 
Soto, P. J., Jr. 
Stafford-Smith, E. B., Jr. 
St. Amand, Bro. Charles 
Stavrakos, H. J. 
Steiner, Norma 
Sumrall, Mary 
Swann, Sr. Placida 
Taylor, T. J., Ill 
Tellier, Bro. Alphonse 
Tetlow, J. A., S.J. 
Thierry, Paul 
Thoman, C. J., S.J. 
Thomas, R. M., S.J. 
Tiblier, E., S.J. 
Toups, Bro. David 



Trahan, Bro. Louis Bernard 
Traynor, J., S.J. 
Turner, S. H., Jr. 
Tylenda, J. N., S.J. 
Underhill, W., S.J. 
Valence, E., S.J. 
Vann, Hettie 
Vincent, Patricia 
Voelker, Bro. Alton 
Walle, J. G„ S.J. 
Walsh, W., S.J. 
Wanucha, Stanley 
Weathers, H. T. 
Welsh, J. R., S.J. 
Wenzel, Bro. Cyran 
Whiting, R. F., S.J. 
Wilson, Crown, S.J. 
Wilson, H. E. 
Wohlbruck, Bro. Kostka 
Woolsey, Jere E., Jr. 
Wyjhoskie, H. M. 
Zibilich, Bro. Foster 
Zoghby, Michael 



Bulletin of Information 



Page Ninety -one 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 

Number of 
Students 

Regular Session — Full Time ... 603 

Regular Session — Part Time 98 

Evening Division 211 

Summer Session — 1 95 1 298 

Total Gross Enrollment 1210 

Less Duplication 1 63 

Total Net Enrollment 1 047 

Summary of Full Time Enrollment 



By Class: 

Freshmen 202 

Sophomores 140 

Juniors 144 

Seniors 106 

Postgraduates 8 

Special 3 

By Courses: 

Arts 79 

Commerce 183 

Natural Sciences 143 

Social Sciences 198 

By Place of Residence: 

Alabama 274 

Arkansas 6 

California 1 

District of Columbia 1 

Florida 50 

Georgia 21 

Illinois 39 

Kentucky 8 



Louisiana 59 

Maryland 2 

Massachusetts 3 

Michigan 6 

Mississippi 13 

Missouri 10 

Nebraska 1 

New Jersey 10 

New Mexico I 

New York 25 

Ohio 4 

Oklahoma — 2 

Pennsylvania 5 

South Carolina 7 

Tennessee — 9 

Texas 12 

Virginia 6 

West Viriginia 1 

Wisconsin 12 

Canada 1 

Cuba — 4 

N. W. I 3 

Mexico 2 

Puerto Rico 4 



J' 



Page Ninety -two 



Spring Hill College 



•I